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Very,very Sad News For Me, My Momma Passed Away...


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...this morning. She would have been 92 in May. If anyone was good enough to go to heaven, it was my momma. I don.t think anyone ever said one bad word about her. It may sound like a foolish thing to say about somone over 90 BUT it came as such a shock when I discovered her in bed today. The saddest day I will ever have, I will never get over this.

I was a little down about the recent developments for my colts(her hometown was Baltimore) but was still excited & lookong forward to our future with Luck. But man did we get a perspective of what really is most dear to us today.

I already miss her so much.

I didn't know if I should share all this with everyone,especially since I re-joined this forum recently but I feel like I know some of you from your posts. So I decided to share.

Anyway, life goes on & hopefully our Colts will go on with much success.

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You have my sympathies. I lost my mother at 90 almost 2 years ago, and I promise you that it does slowly get easier. I just count myself lucky that she was around for so long. Many don't have that blessing. So many good memories to think about - I see that you have them too. Hang in there.

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It is so difficult to articulate & encapsulate the influence & legacy of our mothers & the crucial role they played in molding their children into responsible, caring adults that our parents would ultimately be proud of.

She took care of you when you were ill, she encouraged you when you were depressed & doubted your God given talents, & she always knew just what to say to make you smile, laugh, & carry on through the dark & gloomy times.

Mothers are the unsung heroes of sacrifice in this world. God Bless your mother, family, & friends during this unsettling time...May you find peace & comfort in the positive memories & redeeming impact she left on everyone around her.

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LJ, your post really hit home for me.

Three years ago, I was the only at my father's bedside when he passed away. That was a day that I am still trying to forget, but I know I never will.

I am now the main caregiver for my mother who will soon be 91. I realize that the odds are much, much greater that she will pass before I do; but I dread the thought of that day and can't even imagine how hard it was for you to be the one to find your mother.

I am glad that you shared with us not only because it does help one put things into perspective. But, also because much like you, I have come to think of many of the members here as great friends and am glad that you share that same feeling of camaraderie.

My heart goes out to you and my thoughts, tears, and prayers are with you and your family.

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I wish there was no 'like' limit. I would like every post on this topic just in thanks to everyone who took the two seconds out of their time to care for someone they've never even met. I have a great deal more respect for many members on this forum now, and I appreciate each and every one of you who commented.

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