King Colt

New NFL Rules Kill The Term "Blue Collar"

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As professional football is changing the game from contact to whatever the term "blue collar" is a thing of the past. I wonder what will replace it. Perhaps "rude" or obstinate" or even "bullies". Suggestions?? 

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18 hours ago, King Colt said:

As professional football is changing the game from contact to whatever the term "blue collar" is a thing of the past. I wonder what will replace it. Perhaps "rude" or obstinate" or even "bullies". Suggestions?? 

 

latest?cb=20130607190050

 

:scratch:  What does "blue collar" mean to you?  I would call Andrew Luck blue collar.  I would definitely call Quenton Nelson blue collar.

 

Blue collar usually means hard worker because it involves manual labor.  Players are going to have to work just as hard for their jobs/wins no matter what the rules are.

 

Maybe the term you were thinking of is "violent"?  There will still be blue collar players working hard, but there will be fewer violent players as the rules evolve.  The whole point of the newer rules is to prevent guys from head-hunting.

 

If you want to watch a grown man purposefully knock another man unconscious without getting a penalty for it, you can still watch boxing and MMA.

 

:dunno:

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3 minutes ago, Lucky Colts Fan said:

 

latest?cb=20130607190050

 

:scratch:  What does "blue collar" mean to you?  I would call Andrew Luck blue collar.  I would definitely call Quenton Nelson blue collar.

 

Blue collar usually means hard worker because it involves manual labor.  Players are going to have to work just as hard for their jobs/wins no matter what the rules are.

 

Maybe the term you were thinking of is "violent"?  There will still be blue collar players working hard, but there will be fewer violent players as the rules evolve.  The whole point of the newer rules is to prevent guys from head-hunting.

 

If you want to watch a grown man purposefully knock another man unconscious, you can still watch boxing and MMA.

 

:dunno:

You forgot Soccer and Rugby

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1 minute ago, PrincetonTiger said:

@Lucky Colts Fan

   Soccer has a hire rate of concussions and Rugby is more “violent” the Football

 

I think you missed my point.  Since the rules are making it so guys can't purposefully knock each other out, maybe King Colt would enjoy boxing or MMA more than football.

 

Soccer and rugby players aren't purposefully trying to knockout their opponent because that's not the goal, like in boxing and MMA.  Soccer, rugby and football are games, and the point is to score more points than your opponent.

 

Boxing and MMA are bloodsports where the goal is basically to concuss your opponent before they concuss you.

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1 minute ago, Lucky Colts Fan said:

 

I think you missed my point.  Since the rules are making it so guys can't purposefully knock each other out, maybe King Colt would enjoy boxing or MMA more than football.

 

Soccer and rugby players aren't purposefully trying to knockout their opponent because that's not the goal, like in boxing and MMA.  Soccer, rugby and football are games, and the point is to score more points than your opponent.

 

Boxing and MMA are bloodsports where the goal is basically to concuss your opponent before they concuss you.

I understand with Soccer but have you watch an EPL crowd or a Rugby Scrum

   

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Blue Collar is definitely one of those terms that has a very extensive range of meaning. So going by that i don't think anyone knows what you are talking about. Could you explain your definition of "Blue Collar" in other words please?

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8 hours ago, PrincetonTiger said:

I understand with Soccer but have you watch an EPL crowd or a Rugby Scrum

   

With the greatest of respect you have no idea what you're talking about.

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15 hours ago, PrincetonTiger said:

I understand with Soccer but have you watch an EPL crowd or a Rugby Scrum

   

 

Ok... rugby still has rules that say "hey, don't intentionally knockout your opponent" just like soccer or football, whereas boxing or MMA rules are "hey, knock the %$*@ out of your opponent, just don't hit 'em in the nuts".  My sister sent a girl to the hospital in a rugby match, but she was penalized for it.

 

The rate or number of concussions is not what I'm talking about.

 

I'm talking about what the refs are allowing in these sports.  In one category (soccer, rugby, football, etc.) the rules are trending toward allowing fewer concussions, especially if it seems intentional.  In the other category (boxing, MMA, etc.) concussions are still very much encouraged.

 

So if someone is really into concussions, but hates penalties for concussing your opponent, then they will probably enjoy the future of boxing and MMA more than the future of football.

 

:2c:

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18 hours ago, PrincetonTiger said:

I understand with Soccer but have you watch an EPL crowd or a Rugby Scrum

   

 

You are ignoring the fact that Rugby doesn't have the high speed collisions of football.  A lot of football's high speed collisions come from blocking, something you arn't allowed to do in Rugby and from a forward pass and the defender trying to break up the forward pass.   There is no forward pass in Rugby.  

 

Don't get me wrong it's still a very physical game and a violent game.  But high speed collisions are a big cause of injury in American football.  Rugby's rules eliminate those.  

 

Also the rules on tackling in Rugby are tighter then those of American football.  

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46 minutes ago, Valpo2004 said:

 

You are ignoring the fact that Rugby doesn't have the high speed collisions of football.  A lot of football's high speed collisions come from blocking, something you arn't allowed to do in Rugby and from a forward pass and the defender trying to break up the forward pass.   There is no forward pass in Rugby.  

 

Don't get me wrong it's still a very physical game and a violent game.  But high speed collisions are a big cause of injury in American football.  Rugby's rules eliminate those.  

 

Also the rules on tackling in Rugby are tighter then those of American football.  

Was adding sports that some consider violent to @Lucky Colts Fan list

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21 hours ago, Lucky Colts Fan said:

 

latest?cb=20130607190050

 

:scratch:  What does "blue collar" mean to you?  I would call Andrew Luck blue collar.  I would definitely call Quenton Nelson blue collar.

 

Blue collar usually means hard worker because it involves manual labor.  Players are going to have to work just as hard for their jobs/wins no matter what the rules are.

 

Maybe the term you were thinking of is "violent"?  There will still be blue collar players working hard, but there will be fewer violent players as the rules evolve.  The whole point of the newer rules is to prevent guys from head-hunting.

 

If you want to watch a grown man purposefully knock another man unconscious without getting a penalty for it, you can still watch boxing and MMA.

 

:dunno:

Yeah, Stanford boys are former coal miners.

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Blue Collar: Bedarik, Butkis, Karras, Unitas, Ditka to name a few. No cry babies allowed. In 10 year football will be in name only.

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The term "blue collar" can be used for every player that plays. If they don't work hard and work their talent to the best of their ability they will be replaced by those who do.

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5 hours ago, King Colt said:

Yeah, Stanford boys are former coal miners.

 

5 hours ago, King Colt said:

Blue Collar: Bedarik, Butkis, Karras, Unitas, Ditka to name a few. No cry babies allowed. In 10 year football will be in name only.

 

I'm even more confused now.  :scratch:  (and it's Bednarik btw)

 

If your definition of "blue collar" is "players that played 50 years ago, when football provided supplemental income", then yeah, you're right, "blue collar" is a thing of the past.  No player in todays' NFL has to work in a coalmine to supplement their income...  :facepalm:

 

... as far as whatever other point you were trying to make, I am completely lost...

 

:hat:

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8 minutes ago, Lucky Colts Fan said:

 

 

I'm even more confused now.  :scratch:

 

If your definition of "blue collar" is "players that played 50 years ago, when football provided supplemental income", then yeah, you're right, "blue collar" is a thing of the past.  No player in todays' NFL has to work in a coalmine to supplement their income...  :facepalm:

 

... I'm pretty sure there are absolutely ZERO "cry babies" in the NFL, or any other professional sport...

 

It takes a MAN (or woman, depending on the sport) to play these sports as a professional.

 

As far as what it takes to post your opinion on a forum... well, let's just say the criteria are not nearly as demanding...

 

:hat:

Most ‘cry babies” are out of sport by HS

 

     Not sure I would have listed Alex Karras as Blue Collar

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On 5/30/2018 at 4:55 PM, King Colt said:

As professional football is changing the game from contact to whatever the term "blue collar" is a thing of the past. I wonder what will replace it. Perhaps "rude" or obstinate" or even "bullies". Suggestions?? 

Well done.   No one has any idea what you're talking about again 

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16 minutes ago, lollygagger8 said:

I'm wearing a blue shirt and the collar is blue. 

 

giphy.gif

 

I am sorry son, but our @King Colt hath spoketh:

 

On 5/31/2018 at 3:54 PM, King Colt said:

Yeah, Stanford boys are former coal miners.

 

Thou must go forth and worketh in the coal mines.  If ye returneth alive, then mayhap ye shall be allowed to playeth the game of football with your fellow bretheren that survived the coal mines.

 

God Speed my son!

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LCF You left out what Luck's daddy does for a living. Why?

By the way, it's "God's" speed. ;)

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11 hours ago, King Colt said:

LCF You left out what Luck's daddy does for a living. Why?

 

That would be Commissioner of the XFL ...

 

Why?

 

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On 6/5/2018 at 8:27 AM, King Colt said:

LCF You left out what Luck's daddy does for a living. Why?

By the way, it's "God's" speed. ;)

Actually it's Godspeed.   One word.   

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On 5/31/2018 at 12:58 PM, King Colt said:

Blue Collar: Bedarik, Butkis, Karras, Unitas, Ditka to name a few. No cry babies allowed. In 10 year football will be in name only.

You mean these guys....many who smoked, drank, and took several months off as opposed to the guys who train nearly year round? Those blue collar guys? 

 

This seriously sounds like.....:lecture:

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14 hours ago, Four2itus said:

You mean these guys....many who smoked, drank, and took several months off as opposed to the guys who train nearly year round? Those blue collar guys? 

 

This seriously sounds like.....:lecture:

You left out spit in each others faces, grabbed each other balls, stuck fingers in eyes during pile ups and spit on the ball just as the centers grabbed it. No vests to protect the QB's ribs, single bar face masks. skimpy shoulder pads. Blood & guts versus mega contracts and product endorsements. 

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3 minutes ago, King Colt said:

You left out spit in each others faces, grabbed each other balls, stuck fingers in eyes during pile ups and spit on the ball just as the centers grabbed it. No vests to protect the QB's ribs, single bar face masks. skimpy shoulder pads. Blood & guts versus mega contracts and product endorsements. 

 

Well back in my day, we didn't even speak to one another.  We just killed and ate each other.  We didn't even play sports, much less make money, it was all about survival.  Games were for the weak.

 

th.jpg

0322cavemen.jpg

caveman_pillowfightsWM.jpg?fit=400,443&s

 

Humans these days are so weak with their collars of varying colors.

 

:lecture:

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People don't want to see injuries but they roar at races when there are wrecks, cheer hockey, baseball and basketball games when there are brawls, boo fighters when they don't exchange punches. It has always been that way and always will be.

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6 hours ago, King Colt said:

People don't want to see injuries but they roar at races when there are wrecks, cheer hockey, baseball and basketball games when there are brawls, boo fighters when they don't exchange punches. It has always been that way and always will be.

Does that make all of us in this forum 'blue collar'?

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Obviously there will be grumbling about the new football rules that will attempt to remove the brutal hits from the game. But football is in trouble because of concussions and the high rate of injury. Parents look at football vs. lacrosse, soccer, and other sports, and figure their kid is far safer playing those sports. The pool of players is going to be drastically reduced in a few years time. The NFL has no choice but to do what it can to reduce high impact injures, especially concussions, in order to save the game. 

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When athletic competition caters to fans the players become the fans. Indy open wheel racing improved the safety of the cars instead of reducing the speed. 

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13 minutes ago, King Colt said:

When athletic competition caters to fans the players become the fans. Indy open wheel racing improved the safety of the cars instead of reducing the speed. 

 

So if we just improve the equipment enough, we don't have to change the rules?  I see where you're coming from.

 

This guy is already one step ahead of you.  Introducing the Bubble Hat:

 

WHkHpE2.png?1

 

Goodbye concussions, hello blue collar football!  And it's safe for kids!

 

wvBJ6V.gif

 

And don't worry, you'll still be able to poke your opponent in the eye like the good ol' days.

 

ios_large_1491069417_image.jpg

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maxresdefault.thumb.jpg.95efd74f76a4c2a2efb93c6edf61b53a.jpg

 

New NFL Rules Kill The Term "Blue Collar"

 

Huh?

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1 hour ago, King Colt said:

When athletic competition caters to fans the players become the fans. Indy open wheel racing improved the safety of the cars instead of reducing the speed. 

So let me get this right.

All you care in sports is the violence. You have no regard for the person playing that sport.

As long as you get your violent fix you don't care. 

Look,  I have seen the results of concussions first hand.  As most long time forum members know about my middle grandson. His second concussion in two years in high school effected him the rest of his life. He will never live a normal life. He was an all star player all the way from pop warner all the way to his senior season in high school. He was being watched by quite a few colleges and had 12 letters of interest from those colleges.  He was lined up for a scholarship to help with his education.

All gone with concussion #2. Now he can't even hold a nail to hammer it. He has memory loss. He suffers from uncontrollable tremors and can't even write his name legible.

He played linebacker. I used to cheer him when he made great plays and hits.

Yeah it's all good till that one play happens. Taking him to all the specialist hoping someone can do something for him just to be told it's out of their hands.

Is that "blue collar" enough for you?

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25 minutes ago, crazycolt1 said:

All gone with concussion #2. Now he can't even hold a nail to hammer it. He has memory loss. He suffers from uncontrollable tremors and can't even write his name legible.

 

Sorry to hear that. That second concussion must have been really severe. Are his tremors seizures or something else?

 

All this "blue collar" talk is nonsense. It sounds like someone who derives pleasure from seeing other people getting hurt.

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5 minutes ago, NFLfan said:

 

All this "blue collar" talk is nonsense. It sounds like someone who derives pleasure from seeing other people getting hurt.

So true

   I get what @crazycolt1 is talking about first hand

      I had to wear “special” top of the line equipment with extra pads and tape for every practice and game. My “career”(I continued to dress out for the season but could never go at 100% again) ended as a Senior after a practice injury

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3 hours ago, King Colt said:

When athletic competition caters to fans the players become the fans. Indy open wheel racing improved the safety of the cars instead of reducing the speed. 

 

Ahhh, Not always... I beg to differ-


'Arie Luyendyk’s “unofficial” 1996 practice lap of 239.260 mph is so well known, the “un” hardly seems to matter. He is the speed king of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, and he made it official by setting records for the fastest averages in one (237.498 mph) and four (236.986 mp) qualifying laps, also in 1996. But slower runs later on stuck him in the back half of the field to start the race.'


"1997 marked the introduction of a new production-based, normally aspirated engine formula as well as a new chassis design. The new engine formula resulted in a substantial drop in speeds compared to the previous year, and the chassis were noticeably different in many aspects - both visually, and mechanically.  Arie Luyendyk took to the track in qualifying and began the second wave of qualifiers on pole day. His run of 218.263 mph put him firmly on the pole position, with Tony Stewart close behind at 218.021 mph."

 

That is a drop of almost 20 mph average per lap in one year... but that didn't stop them from continuous mechanical safety innovations either.  It takes both.

 

The NFL is 'reducing the speed' during kickoffs (trying anyway).  it. Researchers found that the differences between impacts that led to concussions and those that didn’t had to do with how and where the brain shakes after the impact.

 

Hopefully this new research leads to better diagnoses in real time and better treatments, and better designed equipment. Both.

 

https://www.everydayhealth.com/concussion/new-study-sheds-light-on-what-really-happens-inside-your-head-when-you-have-concussion/

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4 hours ago, NFLfan said:

 

Sorry to hear that. That second concussion must have been really severe. Are his tremors seizures or something else?

 

All this "blue collar" talk is nonsense. It sounds like someone who derives pleasure from seeing other people getting hurt.

I appreciate your respond for sure.

My grandson's tremors are not seizures.  They are a neurological problem.

The prognosis is through time he will get better. He will never be 100% but only time will hold the future for him.

The other problem is the guilt I went through. I am the one who took him to his practices and games. I am the one who talked to him about his education while he was playing football and the opportunity he had with a scholarship. All that gone in a split second. 

It puts a whole new perspective mentally on contact sports for me.

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14 hours ago, crazycolt1 said:

I appreciate your respond for sure.

My grandson's tremors are not seizures.  They are a neurological problem.

The prognosis is through time he will get better. He will never be 100% but only time will hold the future for him.

The other problem is the guilt I went through. I am the one who took him to his practices and games. I am the one who talked to him about his education while he was playing football and the opportunity he had with a scholarship. All that gone in a split second. 

It puts a whole new perspective mentally on contact sports for me.

 

Thanks for sharing. I am sorry to hear that. How old is he? Given his youth, his chances of recovery are probably greater. 

 

No need to feel guilty. Your intentions were good. You did not intend for him get hurt. Hopefully he will recover from this and regain his functioning. (No one is 100% but I get what you were saying.)

 

By the way, seizures are neurological too. I was just wondering what the nature of his tremors were. 

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22 hours ago, ColtsBlueFL said:

 

Ahhh, Not always... I beg to differ-


'Arie Luyendyk’s “unofficial” 1996 practice lap of 239.260 mph is so well known, the “un” hardly seems to matter. He is the speed king of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, and he made it official by setting records for the fastest averages in one (237.498 mph) and four (236.986 mp) qualifying laps, also in 1996. But slower runs later on stuck him in the back half of the field to start the race.'


"1997 marked the introduction of a new production-based, normally aspirated engine formula as well as a new chassis design. The new engine formula resulted in a substantial drop in speeds compared to the previous year, and the chassis were noticeably different in many aspects - both visually, and mechanically.  Arie Luyendyk took to the track in qualifying and began the second wave of qualifiers on pole day. His run of 218.263 mph put him firmly on the pole position, with Tony Stewart close behind at 218.021 mph."

 

That is a drop of almost 20 mph average per lap in one year... but that didn't stop them from continuous mechanical safety innovations either.  It takes both.

 

The NFL is 'reducing the speed' during kickoffs (trying anyway).  it. Researchers found that the differences between impacts that led to concussions and those that didn’t had to do with how and where the brain shakes after the impact.

 

Hopefully this new research leads to better diagnoses in real time and better treatments, and better designed equipment. Both.

 

https://www.everydayhealth.com/concussion/new-study-sheds-light-on-what-really-happens-inside-your-head-when-you-have-concussion/

Been to the drag strip lately??!!

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23 hours ago, crazycolt1 said:

So let me get this right.

All you care in sports is the violence. You have no regard for the person playing that sport.

As long as you get your violent fix you don't care. 

Look,  I have seen the results of concussions first hand.  As most long time forum members know about my middle grandson. His second concussion in two years in high school effected him the rest of his life. He will never live a normal life. He was an all star player all the way from pop warner all the way to his senior season in high school. He was being watched by quite a few colleges and had 12 letters of interest from those colleges.  He was lined up for a scholarship to help with his education.

All gone with concussion #2. Now he can't even hold a nail to hammer it. He has memory loss. He suffers from uncontrollable tremors and can't even write his name legible.

He played linebacker. I used to cheer him when he made great plays and hits.

Yeah it's all good till that one play happens. Taking him to all the specialist hoping someone can do something for him just to be told it's out of their hands.

Is that "blue collar" enough for you?

 You then went on to say,"The other problem is the guilt I went through. I am the one who took him to his practices and games. I am the one who talked to him about his education while he was playing football and the opportunity he had with a scholarship." 

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