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Isray on Luck


CS Colts Fan
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Okay you're clearly a Redskins troll so I shouldn't be giving you attention, but seeing as you can't see the site without registering, I'll just point out that you should stop being a mug. Griffin's 2011 completion, 72.4%. Andrew Luck's 2011 completion, 71.3%. Okay, Griffin's more accurate than Luck, so if we're using that to say he's a better selection, then let's cast both aside, with the first pick of the 2012 NFL Draft, the Indianapolis Colts select the man with 72.9% completion... um, Russell Wilson.

The only reason I posted it is because this whole community seems to be of the opinion that RG3 is just a faster Vick. These numbers clearly dismiss that theory. Obviously you don't draft just based off completion percentage. But when you look at everything else RG3 brings to the table, I don't see how you can call him worse than Luck. They may be equal at the very least.

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The only reason I posted it is because this whole community seems to be of the opinion that RG3 is just a faster Vick. These numbers clearly dismiss that theory. Obviously you don't draft just based off completion percentage. But when you look at everything else RG3 brings to the table, I don't see how you can call him worse than Luck. They may be equal at the very least.

I think a lot of the doubts about RG3 stem from a story we've all heard before. It seems every year a player in college literally skyrockets to the top of the draft after a great season. Clearly there is no crystal ball for any college player as he transitions to the NFL, but there are some formulas and stats which are better than others. Completion percentage, starts, and wins all are decent predictors.

The other huge issue to me about RG3 is that so many colleges stack one side of the ball, placing nearly all talent on D or O, it is hard to really assess if the results are due to over-matched opponents, schemes, etc. Look at Baylor... 113th in the nation in points allowed, but 4th overall in scoring. The spread offense, on a team who clearly has more offensive weapons than defensive...

We've all seen example after example of spread college QBs put up great numbers, look accurate and poised, and completely blow up at the NFL level where reads are critical, and WRs won't be open almost ever, especially primary targets.

Luck has remained exactly where he is for two years. Luck would have been picked over Cam had he come out last year. RG3 was not on the radar two years ago as a top NFL pick. He was doing what lots of college QBs in spread offenses do - put up numbers. I'll take sustained success and evaluation over most recent, or smaller sample size every time. Not saying that will prove correct, but you have to base a selection on some criteria...

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I think a lot of the doubts about RG3 stem from a story we've all heard before. It seems every year a player in college literally skyrockets to the top of the draft after a great season. Clearly there is no crystal ball for any college player as he transitions to the NFL, but there are some formulas and stats which are better than others. Completion percentage, starts, and wins all are decent predictors.

The other huge issue to me about RG3 is that so many colleges stack one side of the ball, placing nearly all talent on D or O, it is hard to really assess if the results are due to over-matched opponents, schemes, etc. Look at Baylor... 113th in the nation in points allowed, but 4th overall in scoring. The spread offense, on a team who clearly has more offensive weapons than defensive...

We've all seen example after example of spread college QBs put up great numbers, look accurate and poised, and completely blow up at the NFL level where reads are critical, and WRs won't be open almost ever, especially primary targets.

Luck has remained exactly where he is for two years. Luck would have been picked over Cam had he come out last year. RG3 was not on the radar two years ago as a top NFL pick. He was doing what lots of college QBs in spread offenses do - put up numbers. I'll take sustained success and evaluation over most recent, or smaller sample size every time. Not saying that will prove correct, but you have to base a selection on some criteria...

all very well said, I agree with the assesment
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I think a lot of the doubts about RG3 stem from a story we've all heard before. It seems every year a player in college literally skyrockets to the top of the draft after a great season. Clearly there is no crystal ball for any college player as he transitions to the NFL, but there are some formulas and stats which are better than others. Completion percentage, starts, and wins all are decent predictors.

The other huge issue to me about RG3 is that so many colleges stack one side of the ball, placing nearly all talent on D or O, it is hard to really assess if the results are due to over-matched opponents, schemes, etc. Look at Baylor... 113th in the nation in points allowed, but 4th overall in scoring. The spread offense, on a team who clearly has more offensive weapons than defensive...

We've all seen example after example of spread college QBs put up great numbers, look accurate and poised, and completely blow up at the NFL level where reads are critical, and WRs won't be open almost ever, especially primary targets.

Luck has remained exactly where he is for two years. Luck would have been picked over Cam had he come out last year. RG3 was not on the radar two years ago as a top NFL pick. He was doing what lots of college QBs in spread offenses do - put up numbers. I'll take sustained success and evaluation over most recent, or smaller sample size every time. Not saying that will prove correct, but you have to base a selection on some criteria...

Right On...

and Mayock categorized RG3's skill position players as ... "outstanding" ...

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Irsay just comes across as an absolute >. It wouldn't surprise me if he was drunk, tweeting nonstop, and just drafted some obscure nobody to be funny and edgy.

well we do have a history it would appear of drafting plenty of obscure nobodies, not all the time though very few of those obscure nobodies were high impact players for us as well
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