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Mo Alie-Cox is going to Tight End school this summer!


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Colts’ Mo Alie-Cox attending Tight End U this summer

Kevin Hickey

 

Indianapolis Colts tight end Mo Alie-Cox is going back to school this summer.

Sort of.

As he steps into the starting tight end role in 2022 following the retirement of Jack Doyle, Alie-Cox understands the weight of the position he’s in. So furthering his development is the top priority over the summer.

That’s why Alie-Cox will be among those attending “Tight End U” this summer.

So it’s not so much a school as it is a camp being run by a pair of All-Pro tight ends in Travis Kelce and George Kittle. Their focus has been to help the development of tight ends across the league while sharing what they’ve learned over their careers.

Most of the schooling is spent breaking down film, running through drills and discussions about the different ways the position is played.

Alie-Cox has stepped into the TE2 role over the last two seasons but now is the leader in the room. He’s also the longest-tenured tight end in the room ahead of second-year Kylen Granson and rookies Jelani Woods and Andrew Ogletree.

In 2021, Alie-Cox recorded 24 receptions for 316 yards and four touchdowns.

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Actually I’m surprised he hasn’t done this type of thing in previous years - if it was offered.  Glad he’s doing it now, though.

 

Maybe they can get him to run faster as well, haha.  Always looks as thought he plods along after a catch.

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We haven't had a true TE1 in a while. I love Jack Doyle and what he provided here, but he was primarily a blocking TE. 

 

I feel like some of the guys we have now can be good receivers, and also learn to block. I hope we see strong improvement from Mo this season. 

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18 minutes ago, AustinnKaine said:

We haven't had a true TE1 in a while. I love Jack Doyle and what he provided here, but he was primarily a blocking TE. 

 

I feel like some of the guys we have now can be good receivers, and also learn to block. I hope we see strong improvement from Mo this season. 

just curious.   Do you feel a "true TE" doesn't need to block much?

I just don't know what "true TE" means.  In my 30 years of watching the NFL, there were always good blocking TE's who provided as much benefit to the team as mostly pass catching TE's.    It all depends what the team needs.

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32 minutes ago, MB-ColtsFan said:

Actually I’m surprised he hasn’t done this type of thing in previous years - if it was offered.  Glad he’s doing it now, though.

 

Maybe they can get him to run faster as well, haha.  Always looks as thought he plods along after a catch.

 

They are going to make him faster...by putting Jelani Woods on the field.

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30 minutes ago, Myles said:

just curious.   Do you feel a "true TE" doesn't need to block much?

I just don't know what "true TE" means.  In my 30 years of watching the NFL, there were always good blocking TE's who provided as much benefit to the team as mostly pass catching TE's.    It all depends what the team needs.

 

There are definitely multiple positions within the TE position.

 

By TE1, I personally mean a guy that can do all of the things asked of TEs, at an above average level. 

 

The part where you say "it all depends on waht the team needs"  --> I completely agree, I think the main deciding factor is, is the TE capable of doing it? If we asked Doyle to be our primary receiver, he can't do it. I remember when they tried it against the Saints a few years back and he was completely shut down. 

 

(TEs off the top of my head I consider as TE1s. Kittle, Andrews, Kelce, Fant)

 

There are some exceptional receiving TEs I left off that small list because I wouldn't trust them to block. And I am sure there are a few I missed adding as well. Of course everyone wants a well-rounded elite TE. I just feel like we haven't had that in a long time. 

 

Even when we had Fleener and the other TE (Dwayne Allen), they both played different roles. This is probably due to the scarcity of well-rounded elite TEs overall. So of course asking for a Kelce is like asking for an elite at any position. You kinda got to get lucky to obtain one. 

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1 hour ago, jvan1973 said:

This is cool,  but why would Kittle and Kelce want to make other Tight ends better?

Aside from just building friendship and network…. If you look at the TE pay scale I’d say it’s to better the position across the league to where it’s a position of more need then contracts start to reflect that 

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2 hours ago, jvan1973 said:

This is cool,  but why would Kittle and Kelce want to make other Tight ends better?

Why not? It’s not like they’re playing for the same team. I’m sure there is also a fee in order to attend, so they’re probably gaining financially.

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3 hours ago, AustinnKaine said:

why not? i think thats the better question

Because they are active players still, and they are still trying to win SBs each on teams that are competitive. What they are doing essentially makes other TEs and other teams better that could be threats to make the SB and/or win h2h games Vs them. 

 

This would be something that players would do after they retire, not while they are active players in the NFL still. I would never teach young players my secrets and have other teams I'm not on benefit from it. Save that after you retire when you can become a coach IMO.

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18 minutes ago, Jared Cisneros said:

Because they are active players still, and they are still trying to win SBs each on teams that are competitive. What they are doing essentially makes other TEs and other teams better that could be threats to make the SB and/or win h2h games Vs them. 

 

This would be something that players would do after they retire, not while they are active players in the NFL still. I would never teach young players my secrets and have other teams I'm not on benefit from it. Save that after you retire when you can become a coach IMO.

Yea those crazy Mannings running all those QB camps…what were they thinking?

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3 hours ago, Rolltide_gocolts said:

Aside from just building friendship and network…. If you look at the TE pay scale I’d say it’s to better the position across the league to where it’s a position of more need then contracts start to reflect that 


I think your answer is closest to the correct answer.    I’ve been reading this off-season that the NFL tight end community AND their agents can’t believe how much more top wide receivers are making than the top tight ends.   
 

Besides often being an important receiver, a good tight end is often also a key blocker for the run game.   So their value would appear to be under-appreciated.    The TE’s wants something close to comparable pay.   So yes, they’re helping each other with the hope big pay raises are in their future. 

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1 minute ago, Btown_Colt said:

Yea those crazy Mannings running all those QB camps…what were they thinking?

My point stands. Kittle and Kelce are still teaching active players how to play TE while being active players themselves. That takes away part of their edge, and I'm sure Andy Reid and Kyle Shanahan aren't in favor of it. Just like I'm sure all of Peyton and Eli's coaches weren't in favor of it either.

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1 hour ago, Jared Cisneros said:

Because they are active players still, and they are still trying to win SBs each on teams that are competitive. What they are doing essentially makes other TEs and other teams better that could be threats to make the SB and/or win h2h games Vs them. 

 

This would be something that players would do after they retire, not while they are active players in the NFL still. I would never teach young players my secrets and have other teams I'm not on benefit from it. Save that after you retire when you can become a coach IMO.

sounds selfish and paranoid.

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11 hours ago, jvan1973 said:

This is cool,  but why would Kittle and Kelce want to make other Tight ends better?

I thought the same thing.   I expected to hear it was run by recent retired TE's.  

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11 hours ago, jvan1973 said:

This is cool,  but why would Kittle and Kelce want to make other Tight ends better?

 

  It appears as both unselfish and Union activicism. Quite admirable. 
  Kelce is a treat to watch.

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7 hours ago, Jared Cisneros said:

My point stands. Kittle and Kelce are still teaching active players how to play TE while being active players themselves. That takes away part of their edge, and I'm sure Andy Reid and Kyle Shanahan aren't in favor of it. Just like I'm sure all of Peyton and Eli's coaches weren't in favor of it either.

Lol ok. I’ll leave this for you.

 

https://www.espn.com/nfl/story/_/id/31707621/inside-tight-end-university-george-kittle-co-learn-best-country

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16 hours ago, MB-ColtsFan said:

Actually I’m surprised he hasn’t done this type of thing in previous years - if it was offered.  Glad he’s doing it now, though.

 

Maybe they can get him to run faster as well, haha.  Always looks as thought he plods along after a catch.

TE University was offered last summer as well and Dawson knox went.

 

It really seemed to improve his game

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14 hours ago, jvan1973 said:

This is cool,  but why would Kittle and Kelce want to make other Tight ends better?

Von Miller has a Pass Rush Summit

 

"The NFL's best rushers were on hand to share their tricks of the trade at the third annual Pass Rush Summit at UNLV. Featuring Aaron Donald, Calais Campbell, DeMarcus Ware, Yannick Ngakoue, Bradley Chubb, Frank Clark and quarterback Doug Flutie."

 

I wish Paye and Dayo would go

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9 hours ago, Jared Cisneros said:

My point stands. Kittle and Kelce are still teaching active players how to play TE while being active players themselves. That takes away part of their edge, and I'm sure Andy Reid and Kyle Shanahan aren't in favor of it. Just like I'm sure all of Peyton and Eli's coaches weren't in favor of it either.

Peyton was so great I doubt he was scared someone would be better than him. So with Peyton it was fun for him. I am like you though in this way, I would want every edge I could get over any player if I was in the NFL. Mo has good potential.

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Lol at this back and forth about whether a player should or shouldn't help others in the same sport they compete in. 

 

Who is your master? Is competition your master? Is success your master? Is beating the other guy at all costs your master?

 

I run a guitar shop, and I'll take the time to share a little history about the guitar industry. The first guitar makers, were violin makers. That's why the first guitars had "F" hole slots for the sound to come out....just like a violin. They guarded their secrets very jealously. One who wanted to get into violin/guitar making, would have to "apprentice" with a knowledgeable maker for years, even decades until they were allowed to see the "tricks and secrets" that the maker used to craft a high quality instrument. Real tone, longevity, and quality, were only available to those who could afford it. Secrets slowly got out, but it was a slow growth to the industry quality. Makers would even share misinformation that would cause their competition to ruin their instruments by using the wrong methods. 

 

In the 1960's a group of luthiers on the east coast started gathering and sharing their knowledge. They were young and at the top of their game. They would end up holding seminars, and consortiums. They taught all who wanted the knowledge, and quality of guitar instruction in the last 50 years has exploded. A guitar of 200 dollars today, is on par with the quality of a guitar from the 60's at the same price. 

 

Winning is great. Raising the level of the industry just might be the master of those who have gathered this camp. 

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3 minutes ago, Four2itus said:

Lol at this back and forth about whether a player should or shouldn't help others in the same sport they compete in. 

 

Who is your master? Is competition your master? Is success your master? Is beating the other guy at all costs your master?

 

I run a guitar shop, and I'll take the time to share a little history about the guitar industry. The first guitar makers, were violin makers. That's why the first guitars had "F" hole slots for the sound to come out....just like a violin. They guarded their secrets very jealously. One who wanted to get into guitar making, would have to "apprentice" with a knowledgeable makers for years, even decades until they were allowed to see the "tricks and secrets" that the maker used to craft a high quality instrument. Real tone, longevity, and quality, were only available to those who could afford it. Secrets slowly got out, but it was a slow growth to the industry quality. Makers would even share misinformation that would cause their competition to ruin their instruments by using the wrong methods. 

 

In the 1960's a group of luthiers on the east coast started gathering and sharing their knowledge. They were young and at the top of their game. They would end up holding seminars, and consortiums. They taught all who wanted the knowledge, and quality of guitar instruction in the last 50 years has exploded. A guitar of 200 dollars today, is on par with the quality of a guitar from the 60's at the same price. 

 

Winning is great. Raising the level of the industry just might be the master of those who have gathered this camp. 

There is some truth to that but it does not apply broadly.   Jobs could have shared all his companies secrets in order to help competition, but it would not have been good for him.

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9 minutes ago, Four2itus said:

Lol at this back and forth about whether a player should or shouldn't help others in the same sport they compete in. 

 

Who is your master? Is competition your master? Is success your master? Is beating the other guy at all costs your master?

 

I run a guitar shop, and I'll take the time to share a little history about the guitar industry. The first guitar makers, were violin makers. That's why the first guitars had "F" hole slots for the sound to come out....just like a violin. They guarded their secrets very jealously. One who wanted to get into violin/guitar making, would have to "apprentice" with a knowledgeable maker for years, even decades until they were allowed to see the "tricks and secrets" that the maker used to craft a high quality instrument. Real tone, longevity, and quality, were only available to those who could afford it. Secrets slowly got out, but it was a slow growth to the industry quality. Makers would even share misinformation that would cause their competition to ruin their instruments by using the wrong methods. 

 

In the 1960's a group of luthiers on the east coast started gathering and sharing their knowledge. They were young and at the top of their game. They would end up holding seminars, and consortiums. They taught all who wanted the knowledge, and quality of guitar instruction in the last 50 years has exploded. A guitar of 200 dollars today, is on par with the quality of a guitar from the 60's at the same price. 

 

Winning is great. Raising the level of the industry just might be the master of those who have gathered this camp. 

Apollo trained Rocky to beat Clubber so there it is in a nut shell :billiejean:

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38 minutes ago, Myles said:

There is some truth to that but it does not apply broadly.   Jobs could have shared all his companies secrets in order to help competition, but it would not have been good for him.

That’s a little different. I can show you how to grip a curve ball, doesn’t mean I can throw one. My son can throw a curve ball, doesn’t meant he will make the MLB or holds some secret that others don’t. 

 

You think Kittle holds some trade secret that makes him better than the rest? No, he is just an elite talent and does what everybody else is coached to do, he just does it better.

 

If Peyton has been running QB camps…why hasn’t all of the participants been as good as he was?

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1 hour ago, Btown_Colt said:

That’s a little different. I can show you how to grip a curve ball, doesn’t mean I can throw one. My son can throw a curve ball, doesn’t meant he will make the MLB or holds some secret that others don’t. 

 

You think Kittle holds some trade secret that makes him better than the rest? No, he is just an elite talent and does what everybody else is coached to do, he just does it better.

 

If Peyton has been running QB camps…why hasn’t all of the participants been as good as he was?

You are talking in absolutes.   That doesn't happen.  

I don't think it is wrong to do what Kittle and Kelce are doing, it just struck me as a bit odd.  

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1 hour ago, Btown_Colt said:

That’s a little different. I can show you how to grip a curve ball, doesn’t mean I can throw one. My son can throw a curve ball, doesn’t meant he will make the MLB or holds some secret that others don’t. 

 

You think Kittle holds some trade secret that makes him better than the rest? No, he is just an elite talent and does what everybody else is coached to do, he just does it better.

 

If Peyton has been running QB camps…why hasn’t all of the participants been as good as he was?

 

  Surely the coaching in the NFL is good enough to teach all the skills.
 Yes maybe they sit around and discuss defensive players and how to attack them individually. There is all the tape they need to learn from Kittle and Kelce. Whatever.

  Unity and friendship would make it all worthwhile. 

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13 hours ago, Jared Cisneros said:

Because they are active players still, and they are still trying to win SBs each on teams that are competitive. What they are doing essentially makes other TEs and other teams better that could be threats to make the SB and/or win h2h games Vs them. 

 

This would be something that players would do after they retire, not while they are active players in the NFL still. I would never teach young players my secrets and have other teams I'm not on benefit from it. Save that after you retire when you can become a coach IMO.


Its called professional courtesy. I think most of us would be surprised to find out how many NFL players see it as just a job. Yeah they are competitive and want to win.  However, I bet a lot of them are friends.  Big Q and Taylor Lewan are an example of friends outside the game. They probably give each other advice and want each other to play lights out. 
 

There will always be a bit of rivalry with other teams and players. However, fans buy into this way more. 

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On 6/16/2022 at 6:02 PM, AustinnKaine said:

 

There are definitely multiple positions within the TE position.

 

By TE1, I personally mean a guy that can do all of the things asked of TEs, at an above average level. 

 

The part where you say "it all depends on waht the team needs"  --> I completely agree, I think the main deciding factor is, is the TE capable of doing it? If we asked Doyle to be our primary receiver, he can't do it. I remember when they tried it against the Saints a few years back and he was completely shut down. 

 

(TEs off the top of my head I consider as TE1s. Kittle, Andrews, Kelce, Fant)

 

There are some exceptional receiving TEs I left off that small list because I wouldn't trust them to block. And I am sure there are a few I missed adding as well. Of course everyone wants a well-rounded elite TE. I just feel like we haven't had that in a long time. 

 

Even when we had Fleener and the other TE (Dwayne Allen), they both played different roles. This is probably due to the scarcity of well-rounded elite TEs overall. So of course asking for a Kelce is like asking for an elite at any position. You kinda got to get lucky to obtain one. 

 

There are several types of TEs. Mostly classified into 2-4 categories.

  • "U", "flex", or "move" TE, which is typically receiving TEs
  • "Y", "single back" or "in-line" TEs that are asked to block a lot, which is often times a DE. 
  • "H-back" hybrid that might be shorter and can play a little FB and/or catch (think of the Burtons, and probably Granson)
  • Do-it-all / combo (of U and Y)

 

Doyle was a well rounded do-it-all TE. Blocked well, and had 500+ yards in years he got significant targets (clear part of the game plan).  The Colts haven't really made TE a focus or had a U TE since Ebron. And we totally deprioritized him in his second year. Since 2018, the offense simply has prioritized the Y and H elements over U, and in the passing game, overwhelming short possession type stuff. MN game a few years ago was a departure from that, and we see it once every blue moon, but overall, seems to be scheme...

 

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18 minutes ago, EastStreet said:

 

There are several types of TEs. Mostly classified into 2-4 categories.

  • "U", "flex", or "move" TE, which is typically receiving TEs
  • "Y", "single back" or "in-line" TEs that are asked to block a lot, which is often times a DE. 
  • "H-back" hybrid that might be shorter and can play a little FB and/or catch (think of the Burtons, and probably Granson)
  • Do-it-all / combo (of U and Y)

 

Doyle was a well rounded do-it-all TE. Blocked well, and had 500+ yards in years he got significant targets (clear part of the game plan).  The Colts haven't really made TE a focus or had a U TE since Ebron. And we totally deprioritized him in his second year. Since 2018, the offense simply has prioritized the Y and H elements over U, and in the passing game, overwhelming short possession type stuff. MN game a few years ago was a departure from that, and we see it once every blue moon, but overall, seems to be scheme...

 


For whatever it’s worth…. 
 

Both Ballard and Reich refer to the “flex” or “move” tight end as the F, not the U. 
 

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1 minute ago, NewColtsFan said:


For whatever it’s worth…. 
 

Both Ballard and Reich refer to the “flex” or “move” tight end as the F, not the U. 
 

 

I've used the basic 101 terminology that's been around for decades. Like X, Z, slot/Y for WR. All teams have their nuances, as well as some scheme specific terminology. 

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58 minutes ago, EastStreet said:

 

There are several types of TEs. Mostly classified into 2-4 categories.

  • "U", "flex", or "move" TE, which is typically receiving TEs
  • "Y", "single back" or "in-line" TEs that are asked to block a lot, which is often times a DE. 
  • "H-back" hybrid that might be shorter and can play a little FB and/or catch (think of the Burtons, and probably Granson)
  • Do-it-all / combo (of U and Y)

 

Doyle was a well rounded do-it-all TE. Blocked well, and had 500+ yards in years he got significant targets (clear part of the game plan).  The Colts haven't really made TE a focus or had a U TE since Ebron. And we totally deprioritized him in his second year. Since 2018, the offense simply has prioritized the Y and H elements over U, and in the passing game, overwhelming short possession type stuff. MN game a few years ago was a departure from that, and we see it once every blue moon, but overall, seems to be scheme...

 

I think they made due with what they had. and like i said before Doyle was not an accomplished pass catcher, he did alright in short possession passes but I would never rank him as a top TE. (I would rank him as a top blocking TE)

 

 

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