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The NFL isn't paying these guys enough. Comedians, musicians, athletes aren't just entertainers. They're human


Frenchy789
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The Dwayne Haskins news hit me like a train. 

Already all the "he was jaywalking" and "probably drunk" comments are all over YT and Twitter. 

I would not be saying this if the NFL wasn't having consecutive record revenue (2020 same as 2015) with  billionaire owners who demand public money on a regular basis.

 

EDIT: Went outside and talked with roommate, I stand behind what I wrote. Tl;DR Football is going to die if the NCAA keeps treating players like % + NFL is a cutthroat industry where every snap during practice/pads or not and at games, could end your career. Those who retire are forgotten and too many "Beloved Stars" end up in tragic circumstances at very young ages.

 

Did some "follow the money" and sorry but Rage begins here: 

 

NFL Revenue was 4.28 Billion in 2001: in 2019: 15.26 Billion! They get government subsidized stadiums, Snyder cooking the books is just the tip of the iceburg, ignore retired players until a movie and documentaries force them into doing the bare minimum, toradol and all the pills/meds they pump into kids who have to play or get cut. We sure aren't treating them like brothers 

 

Peter 2:17! come on! 

 

Stars have gotten better contracts but not what they should be getting compared to overall NFL revenue increase and the value they bring, recent FA showed players who have a ring will go where the money is. Almost everyone except a few QB's have 5-10 years to essentially make as much money as possible. When they retire, most disappear minus a dozen who show up as analysts, announcers or podcasters. 

 

The hundreds of guys moving non-stop, the agents who take their clients for a ride whilst looking for a younger replacement, it's morally bankrupt. 

 

NOT FOR LONG is real: all the pressure put on these young kids who grew up poor, of course they'll make mistakes. They get 2-3 days of press coverage then they're forgotten. 

 

If they live into their 70's, CTE might at best make them just angry and trigger dementia, at worse, another Mike Webster or even worse: Junior Seau and so many more. 

 

The Christian Kirk trade was wild but you know what? Maybe the actual PLAYERS deserve a bigger slice of the giant NFL revenue pie! Look up "career ending plays", every single snap, in practice and games, they risk losing everything. Considering the cash coming in, the tax payers buying new stadiums every 25-30 years. This is another example of labor getting fked, and I'm no damn commie but between Amazon workers having to keep working around 2 dead bodies and pissing in bottles and all of us working more than ever for less has got to stop. 

 

RAGE OVER 

 

 

Edited by Frenchy789
Quick walk after mild rage post.
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I totally disagree.   Yes the owners make lots of money, but they OWN the team.  I disagree with how they hold cities hostage for money but that has nothing to do with the players.

 

Haskins has over $3 million from his NFL career.   That is very good for how he has played.  

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8 hours ago, Frenchy789 said:

The Dwayne Haskins news hit me like a train. 

Already all the "he was jaywalking" and "probably drunk" comments are all over YT and Twitter. 

I would not be saying this if the NFL wasn't having consecutive record revenue (2020 same as 2015) with  billionaire owners who demand public money on a regular basis.

 

EDIT: Went outside and talked with roommate, I stand behind what I wrote. Tl;DR Football is going to die if the NCAA keeps treating players like % + NFL is a cutthroat industry where every snap during practice/pads or not and at games, could end your career. Those who retire are forgotten and too many "Beloved Stars" end up in tragic circumstances at very young ages.

 

Did some "follow the money" and sorry but Rage begins here: 

 

NFL Revenue was 4.28 Billion in 2001: in 2019: 15.26 Billion! They get government subsidized stadiums, Snyder cooking the books is just the tip of the iceburg, ignore retired players until a movie and documentaries force them into doing the bare minimum, toradol and all the pills/meds they pump into kids who have to play or get cut. We sure aren't treating them like brothers 

 

Peter 2:17! come on! 

 

Stars have gotten better contracts but not what they should be getting compared to overall NFL revenue increase and the value they bring, recent FA showed players who have a ring will go where the money is. Almost everyone except a few QB's have 5-10 years to essentially make as much money as possible. When they retire, most disappear minus a dozen who show up as analysts, announcers or podcasters. 

 

The hundreds of guys moving non-stop, the agents who take their clients for a ride whilst looking for a younger replacement, it's morally bankrupt. 

 

NOT FOR LONG is real: all the pressure put on these young kids who grew up poor, of course they'll make mistakes. They get 2-3 days of press coverage then they're forgotten. 

 

If they live into their 70's, CTE might at best make them just angry and trigger dementia, at worse, another Mike Webster or even worse: Junior Seau and so many more. 

 

The Christian Kirk trade was wild but you know what? Maybe the actual PLAYERS deserve a bigger slice of the giant NFL revenue pie! Look up "career ending plays", every single snap, in practice and games, they risk losing everything. Considering the cash coming in, the tax payers buying new stadiums every 25-30 years. This is another example of labor getting fked, and I'm no damn commie but between Amazon workers having to keep working around 2 dead bodies and pissing in bottles and all of us working more than ever for less has got to stop. 

 

RAGE OVER 

 

 

Gotta disagree with the notion these guys aren’t getting paid enough. We have soldiers and Marines dealing with CTE from both training and combat, amongst other injuries. The average soldier makes less than 45,000 a year.
 

And you’re gonna sit here and cry that professional athletes, some of whom make anywhere from 5 million to 500 million over the course of their careers in salary alone, not counting endorsement deals and such, are under paid?!  Labor getting screwed? You’re crazy. With all due respect to mr Haskin, may he Rest In Peace, but since you used him as an example, made an average of a million a year plus, or a bit over 3 million. 
 

there’s a big difference between an Amazon worker making 12 bucks an hour sorting packages and a professional athlete who makes MILLIONs to play a game he or she chose to play. 

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1 hour ago, csmopar said:

Gotta disagree with the notion these guys aren’t getting paid enough. We have soldiers and Marines dealing with CTE from both training and combat, amongst other injuries. The average soldier makes less than 45,000 a year.
 

And you’re gonna sit here and cry that professional athletes, some of whom make anywhere from 5 million to 500 million over the course of their careers in salary alone, not counting endorsement deals and such, are under paid?!  Labor getting screwed? You’re crazy. With all due respect to mr Haskin, may he Rest In Peace, but since you used him as an example, made an average of a million a year plus, or a bit over 3 million. 
 

there’s a big difference between an Amazon worker making 12 bucks an hour sorting packages and a professional athlete who makes MILLIONs to play a game he or she chose to play. 

 

His point is not a bad one. You can feel the emotion pulsing thru the screen and so maybe he isn't articulating it as well as it could be but don't dismiss it by saying what about X, Y, and Z i.e. casual whataboutism.

 

Soldiers, marines, etc all deal with tough lives. All probably should be paid more too. That doesn't or shouldn't invalidate the point the OP made. When you look at the example of Haskins and point to the over 3M he theoretically made, you're forgetting several basic economic truths. Demand and supply rule. Folks i.e. society doesnt want to watch soldiers do their drills. Athletes make owners bucketloads of money, soldiers dont make the government money, at least not in that way. Amazon workers are a dime a dozen, we all hate to say it but the fact is for most of us, we had chunks of our lives when we worked a warehouse job, or some minimum wage job or a gig that was slightly above minimum wage....and some are still in that grind, and it's rough but lets face the truth, the training required to drive a forklift isnt the same degree of training required to read an NFL level defense while grown men try to pummel you into the soil. /if it was, there'd be a much better supply of NFL QBs. The casual person can be an amazon worker, not so to play QB in the NFL.

 

All told, this thread is ill timed, let the dead have a moment where we stay in respectful silence without debating whether he was fortunate or not. The larger point raised by the OP though, that's one we ought to delve into sometime in the future.

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4 minutes ago, Colt.45 said:

 

 

Soldiers, marines, etc all deal with tough lives. All probably should be paid more too. That doesn't or shouldn't invalidate the point the OP made. When you look at the example of Haskins and point to the over 3M he theoretically made, you're forgetting several basic economic truths. Demand and supply rule. Folks i.e. society doesnt want to watch soldiers do their drills. Athletes make owners bucketloads of money, soldiers dont make the government money, at least not in that way. Amazon workers are a dime a dozen, we all hate to say it but the fact is for most of us, we had chunks of our lives when we worked a warehouse job, or some minimum wage job or a gig that was slightly above minimum wage....and some are still in that grind, and it's rough but lets face the truth, the training required to drive a forklift isnt the same degree of training required to read an NFL level defense while grown men try to pummel you into the soil. /if it was, there'd be a much better supply of NFL QBs. The casual person can be an amazon worker, not so to play QB in the NFL.

 

 

While all true, NFL players are paid a huge premium for their career choice.  They are not entitled to more just because their employer is making lots of money.  They do, and have, benefitted from it though.   Amazon can afford to pay their lower end workers $30 an hour, but they are not required to.  The NFL pays their players very well.  Even the practice squad and bench players make enough to help them live decent for the rest of their lives.

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Just now, Myles said:

While all true, NFL players are paid a huge premium for their career choice.  They are not entitled to more just because their employer is making lots of money.  They do, and have, benefitted from it though.   Amazon can afford to pay their lower end workers $30 an hour, but they are not required to.  The NFL pays their players very well.  Even the practice squad and bench players make enough to help them live decent for the rest of their lives.

Debatable, very debatable. Again, why don't we circle back on this in a week or two so that it can be a fresh debate of its own that won't pull in the memory of this young man.

 

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I personally think most players are overpaid. They know what they are signing up for and are playing a kids game making millions while most of us are barely making ends meat or are far from well off. I been joking about this for years when I say if you can't live off 10 Mill a year than I feel sorry for you and we have players making 20, 30, 40 Mill a year. You can blame the league for this though, they have let it get out of hand, especially the way QB's are paid. I believe players should get paid big money, it is a violent sport and a player may only play 5-7 years but if I am paying a player even just 10 mill a year over that span (I say just lol), they should be well off for a lifetime. It is not our fault that some of these players want to go out and buy a 10 million dollar house and 5 or 6 cars, that is just stupidity at it's finest. Why would someone need to do that then you end up broke. Hell if made 10 mill a year just over 5 years, I could buy a 1 million dollar house with all the trimmings and own 2 really nice cars and still poop out hundreds for the next 40 years.

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31 minutes ago, 2006Coltsbestever said:

I personally think most players are overpaid. They know what they are signing up for and are playing a kids game making millions while most of us are barely making ends meat or are far from well off. I been joking about this for years when I say if you can't live off 10 Mill a year than I feel sorry for you and we have players making 20, 30, 40 Mill a year. You can blame the league for this though, they have let it get out of hand, especially the way QB's are paid. I believe players should get paid big money, it is a violent sport and a player may only play 5-7 years but if I am paying a player even just 10 mill a year over that span (I say just lol), they should be well off for a lifetime. It is not our fault that some of these players want to go out and buy a 10 million dollar house and 5 or 6 cars, that is just stupidity at it's finest. Why would someone need to do that then you end up broke. Hell if made 10 mill a year just over 5 years, I could buy a 1 million dollar house with all the trimmings and own 2 really nice cars and still poop out hundreds for the next 40 years.

I don't have an issue with them getting paid as much as they do.   They chose the career and it is a good one financially.  I have an issue with people thinking they should be paid more.   The salaries have continued to increase through the years.  Much more than inflation.  The are getting paid well in the entertainment industry.   

Even players who fail to become stars have opportunities to succeed financially.  I'll give an example that I know of.  I have to rent heavy equipment for the place I work.  The sale rep is a guy who was once on the IU basketball team.  Bob Knight was his coach.  He didn't play much, but he did play some.  He told me that he had zero sales experience or any work experience when he was hired.  He admitted that he got the position (around $100,000 a year) because people knew his name and would be interested in talking with him and doing business with him.  He's a good guy and talks basketball with many people in the plant and we rent around $1 million per year from him.  

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On 4/10/2022 at 4:48 PM, 2006Coltsbestever said:

I personally think most players are overpaid. They know what they are signing up for and are playing a kids game making millions while most of us are barely making ends meat or are far from well off. I been joking about this for years when I say if you can't live off 10 Mill a year than I feel sorry for you and we have players making 20, 30, 40 Mill a year. You can blame the league for this though, they have let it get out of hand, especially the way QB's are paid. I believe players should get paid big money, it is a violent sport and a player may only play 5-7 years but if I am paying a player even just 10 mill a year over that span (I say just lol), they should be well off for a lifetime. It is not our fault that some of these players want to go out and buy a 10 million dollar house and 5 or 6 cars, that is just stupidity at it's finest. Why would someone need to do that then you end up broke. Hell if made 10 mill a year just over 5 years, I could buy a 1 million dollar house with all the trimmings and own 2 really nice cars and still poop out hundreds for the next 40 years.

The point is: a lot of these guys are from poor backgrounds and have 0 experience saving or investing money. 

 

Agents and lawyers swoop in with contracts and take their cut and then we're all suprised when we hear about the dozens and dozens of horrific post-NFL lives a lot of these players endure.

 

Everyone loves them until they cant play and then boom: out the door, bare bones health insurance: look at the Jets or Jags, how they treat players. 

 

The NFL makes MORE than enough NOT to need public funds for infrastructure and to take care of their former athletes. 

 

Peyton Manning, Moss & co are the exception, not the rule. 

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On 4/10/2022 at 4:21 PM, Colt.45 said:

 

His point is not a bad one. You can feel the emotion pulsing thru the screen and so maybe he isn't articulating it as well as it could be but don't dismiss it by saying what about X, Y, and Z i.e. casual whataboutism.

 

Soldiers, marines, etc all deal with tough lives. All probably should be paid more too. That doesn't or shouldn't invalidate the point the OP made. When you look at the example of Haskins and point to the over 3M he theoretically made, you're forgetting several basic economic truths. Demand and supply rule. Folks i.e. society doesnt want to watch soldiers do their drills. Athletes make owners bucketloads of money, soldiers dont make the government money, at least not in that way. Amazon workers are a dime a dozen, we all hate to say it but the fact is for most of us, we had chunks of our lives when we worked a warehouse job, or some minimum wage job or a gig that was slightly above minimum wage....and some are still in that grind, and it's rough but lets face the truth, the training required to drive a forklift isnt the same degree of training required to read an NFL level defense while grown men try to pummel you into the soil. /if it was, there'd be a much better supply of NFL QBs. The casual person can be an amazon worker, not so to play QB in the NFL.

 

All told, this thread is ill timed, let the dead have a moment where we stay in respectful silence without debating whether he was fortunate or not. The larger point raised by the OP though, that's one we ought to delve into sometime in the future.

 

Thank you, yes I'll admit my blood was boiling. When cities are hung out to dry because their owners dont get 100's of millions for a stadium or athletes with no financial education who went from dirt poor to multi millionaires overnight: they get taken advantage of and blow all that money and we wonder why so many end up bankrupt or dead at such young ages. 

 

Its time we've had the conversation. We don't pay anyone enough anymore: the median home in 1972 was 21k, now its well over 400k. Inflation alone is not to blame, salaries for everyone have just stagnated. 

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3 minutes ago, Frenchy789 said:

 

Thank you, yes I'll admit my blood was boiling. When cities are hung out to dry because their owners dont get 100's of millions for a stadium or athletes with no financial education who went from dirt poor to multi millionaires overnight: they get taken advantage of and blow all that money and we wonder why so many end up bankrupt or dead at such young ages. 

 

Its time we've had the conversation. We don't pay anyone enough anymore: the median home in 1972 was 21k, now its well over 400k. Inflation alone is not to blame, salaries for everyone have just stagnated. 

The median income is no where near 400k.  Wth are you talking about?

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58 minutes ago, Frenchy789 said:

The point is: a lot of these guys are from poor backgrounds and have 0 experience saving or investing money. 

 

Agents and lawyers swoop in with contracts and take their cut and then we're all suprised when we hear about the dozens and dozens of horrific post-NFL lives a lot of these players endure.

 

Everyone loves them until they cant play and then boom: out the door, bare bones health insurance: look at the Jets or Jags, how they treat players. 

 

The NFL makes MORE than enough NOT to need public funds for infrastructure and to take care of their former athletes. 

 

Peyton Manning, Moss & co are the exception, not the rule. 

 

  Uninformed gobbledigook as the NFL Players Assoc. educates their college educated players as rookies. Let the buyer beware.
  After football, get a job!!
  Ever hear of tax abatements? They are everywhere and for a reason. 

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People are under paid all over the place.  Employers have done everything they can to reduce labor costs.  Cost of living has risen much faster than wages in many industries.  Benefits have been reduced and when not reduced a percentage of the cost has been pushed back on the employees.  Jobs are moved overseas to get cheaper labor and then many of the jobs that are left are the low wage jobs.

 

On the other hand I work in IT and most of the people I work with today are not born in America.  Why do I mention that?  Because there are very good paying jobs available but you need to have spent quite a few years in school to qualify and/or be able to demonstrate technical skills.  There are a lot of people that are not willing to do the work it takes to get these jobs.  In India parents have pushed their children to get educated, get advanced degrees in areas where there are good paying jobs.  

 

A little off topic but if we feel NFL players are underpaid I think we need to look at our whole system.  We are still willing to pay NFL players - entertainers - millions while we pay the people we count on to have our kids ready for the real world pennies.

 

Our priorities are screwed up. 

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On 4/11/2022 at 10:35 PM, Frenchy789 said:

The point is: a lot of these guys are from poor backgrounds and have 0 experience saving or investing money. 

 

Agents and lawyers swoop in with contracts and take their cut and then we're all suprised when we hear about the dozens and dozens of horrific post-NFL lives a lot of these players endure.

 

Everyone loves them until they cant play and then boom: out the door, bare bones health insurance: look at the Jets or Jags, how they treat players. 

 

The NFL makes MORE than enough NOT to need public funds for infrastructure and to take care of their former athletes. 

 

Peyton Manning, Moss & co are the exception, not the rule. 

If they are from poor backgrounds they should understand the need to save money.   I don't buy that excuse.   The NFL Players Association teaches them the importance of saving and investing wisely.  I do not have empathy for those who don't.  Many careers are underpaid but not NFL players.  

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It doesn't what what any of us thinks professional athletes should be be paid the market determines that price. If literally every person in America was 6'5", 225lbs, ran a 4.4 40 yard dash and could throw a football 80 yards there would be no value for an NFL QB and they'd make $13 per hour. The fact is out of the 100 million people that would love to play QB professionally only a select few can actually do it which makes the cost to have one much higher. I think this gets viewed from the wrong perspective that NFL players should be happy to make that type of money when the reality is (IMO) that the NFL needs to pay a lot of money to the handful of people in the world able to do these jobs highly effectively. 

 

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1 hour ago, Mitch Connors said:

It doesn't what what any of us thinks professional athletes should be be paid the market determines that price.

 

That isn't completely true. The salary cap and the union are manipulating factors.  Labor and management working against each other.

 

And the market doesn't really drive what people get paid in other professions either.  I was a member in a class action law suit against high tech companies for technical employees where a number of tech companies settled the lawsuit because they were accused of colluding to keep salaries down.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-Tech_Employee_Antitrust_Litigation Apple was one of them.  Anyway - the point is the labor market is not treated as a free market.  Just like so many other markets it is manipulated by those with power.

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18 hours ago, gspdx said:

 

That isn't completely true. The salary cap and the union are manipulating factors.  Labor and management working against each other.

 

And the market doesn't really drive what people get paid in other professions either.  I was a member in a class action law suit against high tech companies for technical employees where a number of tech companies settled the lawsuit because they were accused of colluding to keep salaries down.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-Tech_Employee_Antitrust_Litigation Apple was one of them.  Anyway - the point is the labor market is not treated as a free market.  Just like so many other markets it is manipulated by those with power.

I don't disagree, but the market plays a big factor over the years.  Salary caps are increased in sports to fit the higher pay in.  Same with almost all professions.  Through time certain sought after skilled people make more money than others.

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I understand the frustration of perceiving certain inequities with how football players are compensated...or not....compared to other well compensated people.  I just don't subscribe to the idea that its being led by some big bad, evil, invisible NFL hand that has to be countered by a big good invisible hand that we all need to take action against.  The way things are is the simple result of 350 million people making many individual decisions every day of their lives which intersect with others' decisions about their lives.  That applies to the NFL or any other industry.  The rich group of owners are not guiding everything that happens.  It is what it is, and the results are what they are.

 

I don't know the circumstances of Haskins death, but if the dump truck driver was not ticketed for inappropriate driving, I assume that Haskins is now dead because he didn't have enough awareness at the moment to see that big truck moving fast.  That's not an accusation, that's a matter of fact.  And most people probably would not have attempted to cross the interstate in the first place.  The first bad individual decision.  I'm sorry if I sound unemotionally or insensitive, but if there is advocation for changing "how things are" because of stuff like this, we need to look at what actually happened pretty unemotionally.

 

Should PITT have paid Haskins more because he might get hit by a truck?

Should IND pay Luck more because he might cut his career short by snowboarding?

Should PITT pay Big Ben more because he might go over the front of his motorcycle?

 

A lot of NFL players don't put themselves into those positions, so I don't see why the league or the owners should be bashed for how much money they make compared to the players. 

 

The issue of CTE has been brought to their attention.  And it seem like reasonable people are trying to address it reasonably.

 

As far as college football.  I think there should be some level of basic stipend for the players.  It just seems fair for all of the extra time they are now required to put into the program....and conduct a clean personal life to boot.  I still can't get to the place that says the NCAA is taking advantage of kids though.  The reality is, for every player who's life has been changed by college football there are probably 5 players that go right back to being what they would have been in life if they did not take a 4 year pit stop of playing football.  If they are a CPA at age 30, they probably would have been one if they didn't play college football.  If they are a dump truck driver at age 30, they probably would have been one if they did not play college football.  People are what they are.  Sometimes the exposure works out for a better life, sometimes not.  That's dictated by every individual and I don't see where the NCAA, the NFL, or rich people in general bear that responsibility for what happens, or feel like they need to do something about it.

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5 hours ago, Myles said:

I don't disagree, but the market plays a big factor over the years.  Salary caps are increased in sports to fit the higher pay in.  Same with almost all professions.  Through time certain sought after skilled people make more money than others.

The market plays a big factor for sure.  Just saying there are other factors and we don't keep track of all the ways those in power try to control the markets. 

 

I wonder how much more I might have made over the last 20 years if Apple, Intel, etc.,  hadn't worked together to hold our pay down.  All of that adds up over time.  Fortunately for me l did receive a decent payout from the lawsuit.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 4/12/2022 at 4:44 AM, jvan1973 said:

The median income is no where near 400k.  Wth are you talking about?

Thats common sense.. you didn't read/understand my post. 

 

I wrote  "median home in 1972 was 21k, now its well over 400k" 

 

So at least read/be honest in a discussion. 

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On 4/12/2022 at 10:39 PM, gspdx said:

People are under paid all over the place.  Employers have done everything they can to reduce labor costs.  Cost of living has risen much faster than wages in many industries.  Benefits have been reduced and when not reduced a percentage of the cost has been pushed back on the employees.  Jobs are moved overseas to get cheaper labor and then many of the jobs that are left are the low wage jobs.

 

On the other hand I work in IT and most of the people I work with today are not born in America.  Why do I mention that?  Because there are very good paying jobs available but you need to have spent quite a few years in school to qualify and/or be able to demonstrate technical skills.  There are a lot of people that are not willing to do the work it takes to get these jobs.  In India parents have pushed their children to get educated, get advanced degrees in areas where there are good paying jobs.  

 

A little off topic but if we feel NFL players are underpaid I think we need to look at our whole system.  We are still willing to pay NFL players - entertainers - millions while we pay the people we count on to have our kids ready for the real world pennies.

 

Our priorities are screwed up. 

Thank you, I didn't want to bring economics (NOT POLITICS) into a football forum but if the end result is public entities throwing themselves deeper in debt for a stadium thats empty because the average fan can't afford tickets etc. 

 

Look at the NBA, they care more about their Chinese viewers than domestic fans because of the massive amounts of money they'll make. 

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13 hours ago, Frenchy789 said:

Thank you, I didn't want to bring economics (NOT POLITICS) into a football forum but if the end result is public entities throwing themselves deeper in debt for a stadium thats empty because the average fan can't afford tickets etc. 

 

Look at the NBA, they care more about their Chinese viewers than domestic fans because of the massive amounts of money they'll make. 

 

When I lived in Portland a few years ago there was lots of talk about bringing a baseball team to Portland.  Which I said was fine as long as they don't ask the taxpayers to build the stadium.  Shouldn't ride on the backs of middle class taxpayers.

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8 minutes ago, gspdx said:

 

When I lived in Portland a few years ago there was lots of talk about bringing a baseball team to Portland.  Which I said was fine as long as they don't ask the taxpayers to build the stadium.  Shouldn't ride on the backs of middle class taxpayers.

Unfortunately I think they would ask for money.  I'm sure there is a calculation that is done to see when the payback will be for the city.   I wouldn't bet on it being accurate though.   A stadium would employ around 1500 people.  Not sure that is worth the money they ask for. 

 

I hear that the A's are shopping for a new city.  

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13 hours ago, tweezy32 said:

You literally get paid millions to play football lmao.. I think players are overpaid to play a fun game lol

I tend to agree.  Certainly they are not underpaid.     

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 4/9/2022 at 11:21 PM, Frenchy789 said:

The Dwayne Haskins news hit me like a train. 

Already all the "he was jaywalking" and "probably drunk" comments are all over YT and Twitter. 

I would not be saying this if the NFL wasn't having consecutive record revenue (2020 same as 2015) with  billionaire owners who demand public money on a regular basis.

 

EDIT: Went outside and talked with roommate, I stand behind what I wrote. Tl;DR Football is going to die if the NCAA keeps treating players like % + NFL is a cutthroat industry where every snap during practice/pads or not and at games, could end your career. Those who retire are forgotten and too many "Beloved Stars" end up in tragic circumstances at very young ages.

The goal of all business is to make money.  So to discuss this intelligently you'd need to start with revenue and go from there.  Where does the NFL rank?  First among all sports leagues.  I don't think that's going to change and if anything the NFL is far more popular than it's ever been.

 

This article from October of 2021 cites the NFL revenue as $16B.  That's 1.6x greater than MLB who comes in a distant second.  Revenues change all the time of course, not sure if that's currently the outlook but I'm sure it's close.

 

Now it's really tough to determine how much each NFL team actually makes even by comparing caps because the NFL has revenue sharing and there are other elements that apply to all leagues like "do you own your stadium."  And "how juiced is your stadium with luxury suites."  So it's not an easy question to answer but if you look at Forbes valuation there's a ton of NFL teams and if you look at history the NFL is a leader in how to do it. 

 

I'm old enough to remember them implementing the salary cap first among major sports leagues and the NBA and NHL following suit thereafter.  Them toeing the line and ensuring the league isn't run by the players is not a bad thing by any stretch.  Once again it's important to ensure operating costs are favorable as it is a business.

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On 4/10/2022 at 12:21 AM, Frenchy789 said:

The Dwayne Haskins news hit me like a train. 

Already all the "he was jaywalking" and "probably drunk" comments are all over YT and Twitter. 

I would not be saying this if the NFL wasn't having consecutive record revenue (2020 same as 2015) with  billionaire owners who demand public money on a regular basis.

 

EDIT: Went outside and talked with roommate, I stand behind what I wrote. Tl;DR Football is going to die if the NCAA keeps treating players like % + NFL is a cutthroat industry where every snap during practice/pads or not and at games, could end your career. Those who retire are forgotten and too many "Beloved Stars" end up in tragic circumstances at very young ages.

 

Did some "follow the money" and sorry but Rage begins here: 

 

NFL Revenue was 4.28 Billion in 2001: in 2019: 15.26 Billion! They get government subsidized stadiums, Snyder cooking the books is just the tip of the iceburg, ignore retired players until a movie and documentaries force them into doing the bare minimum, toradol and all the pills/meds they pump into kids who have to play or get cut. We sure aren't treating them like brothers 

 

Peter 2:17! come on! 

 

Stars have gotten better contracts but not what they should be getting compared to overall NFL revenue increase and the value they bring, recent FA showed players who have a ring will go where the money is. Almost everyone except a few QB's have 5-10 years to essentially make as much money as possible. When they retire, most disappear minus a dozen who show up as analysts, announcers or podcasters. 

 

The hundreds of guys moving non-stop, the agents who take their clients for a ride whilst looking for a younger replacement, it's morally bankrupt. 

 

NOT FOR LONG is real: all the pressure put on these young kids who grew up poor, of course they'll make mistakes. They get 2-3 days of press coverage then they're forgotten. 

 

If they live into their 70's, CTE might at best make them just angry and trigger dementia, at worse, another Mike Webster or even worse: Junior Seau and so many more. 

 

The Christian Kirk trade was wild but you know what? Maybe the actual PLAYERS deserve a bigger slice of the giant NFL revenue pie! Look up "career ending plays", every single snap, in practice and games, they risk losing everything. Considering the cash coming in, the tax payers buying new stadiums every 25-30 years. This is another example of labor getting fked, and I'm no damn commie but between Amazon workers having to keep working around 2 dead bodies and pissing in bottles and all of us working more than ever for less has got to stop. 

 

RAGE OVER 

 

 

 

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