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Pittman on his injury


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1 hour ago, Chrisaaron1023 said:

I was waiting bfor this! Seems in good spirits but just so random what happened to him lol. Get well soon bro!

pittman is gonna be a future number 1 wr .  has great size , speed and great route runner.  Wrs take long to get good.   He will be elite by year 3

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4 hours ago, JediXMan said:

Interesting the doctor said they made cuts in 2 of the 4 compartments.

I don’t know much about that syndrome he has, but it sounds pretty rare and pretty bad. Especially with him having surgery. It might be something he has to deal with going forward.

 

 

anyone know the recovery time stats in this? Seems not much out there as far as a timeline. Google results just say it can take a while to heal and may be reoccuring

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39 minutes ago, csmopar said:

I don’t know much about that syndrome he has, but it sounds pretty rare and pretty bad. Especially with him having surgery. It might be something he has to deal with going forward.

 

 

anyone know the recovery time stats in this? Seems not much out there as far as a timeline. Google results just say it can take a while to heal and may be reoccuring

 

Not sure, but Pittman seems optimistic it won't be long

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2 hours ago, jmac_48 said:

Dang, I'm one seriously crusty, grumpy old man...

 

but that is one of the cutest young couples I've ever seen!

Good Luck getting back #11

 

I agree.  I read somewhere, I forget where, that those two were highschool sweet hearts, got together like freshman year or something like that.  That's pretty cool.

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They are so cute. She treats her man well. I crack up at that huge dog. He seems like a big baby. 

 

Seems like because of her he got it fixed fast. Sounds like it just has to heal an there is really no rehab. He should be back after the bye week.

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17 hours ago, Shepman said:

Not trying to be negative but I find it irresponsible eating out in public.

 

14 hours ago, csmopar said:

That’s why we have these things called Masks.... 

 

Yup, and distancing (good spacing) for when the mask is off and you are eating. Restaurants here in FL can operate full capacity and no masks. Yet I still see many where all employees, and customers on entrance, are wearing masks, except for when seated/eating at their table. And the table separation/distancing) is still quite generous (good), not cramped/crowded.  I have and do eat at such places, but I will put on my mask to even get up and go to the rest room.

 

 

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14 hours ago, csmopar said:

I don’t know much about that syndrome he has, but it sounds pretty rare and pretty bad. Especially with him having surgery. It might be something he has to deal with going forward.

 

 

Maybe not rare, but possibly not all that common.  It's from an injury and causes bleeding in a muscle, which then causes increased pressure in the muscle. This pressure increase causes nerve damage due to decreased blood supply. That's why he eventually could not feel his foot.

 

Quote

anyone know the recovery time stats in this? Seems not much out there as far as a timeline. Google results just say it can take a while to heal and may be reoccuring

 

2 hours ago, Chloe6124 said:

They are so cute. She treats her man well. I crack up at that huge dog. He seems like a big baby. 

 

Seems like because of her he got it fixed fast. Sounds like it just has to heal an there is really no rehab. He should be back after the bye week.

 

It is a VERY good thing she made him go get seen, too. Acute compartment syndrome can quickly become a true medical emergency, if left untreated, as the muscles and nerves will fail and may eventually die (permanently) from the loss of blood and oxygen supply.

 

There is a rehab, it is called Physical Therapy, and will begin once the doctor feels the incision is healed enough. Pittman will be given an exercise routine designed to rebuild strength, flexibility, and range of motion in his leg.  At the start, it will entail strengthening and stretching of the muscles without putting any weight on the affected leg. Most can be done at home, too.


Then they will add weight bearing exercises to his daily exercise routine, further strengthening the muscles and increasing his range of motion. When there is no pain associated with these exercises, high impact activity will be permitted. He will (very likely) get specialized shoes (football and even outside the game footwear) with proper arch support/orthotic inserts to minimize any chance for symptoms to recur.  I'm thinking around 6 weeks or so time frame, if things progress well.

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, ColtsBlueFL said:

 

Maybe not rare, but possibly not all that common.  It's from an injury and causes bleeding in a muscle, which then causes increased pressure in the muscle. This pressure increase causes nerve damage due to decreased blood supply. That's why he eventually could not feel his foot.

 

 

 

It is a VERY good thing she made him go get seen, too. Acute compartment syndrome can quickly become a true medical emergency, if left untreated, as the muscles and nerves will fail and may eventually die (permanently) from the loss of blood and oxygen supply.

 

There is a rehab, it is called Physical Therapy, and will begin once the doctor feels the incision is healed enough. Pittman will be given an exercise routine designed to rebuild strength, flexibility, and range of motion in his leg.  At the start, it will entail strengthening and stretching of the muscles without putting any weight on the affected leg. Most can be done at home, too.


Then they will add weight bearing exercises to his daily exercise routine, further strengthening the muscles and increasing his range of motion. When there is no pain associated with these exercises, high impact activity will be permitted. He will (very likely) get specialized shoes (football and even outside the game footwear) with proper arch support/orthotic inserts to minimize any chance for symptoms to recur.  I'm thinking around 6 weeks or so time frame, if things progress well.

 

 

 

so did an impact cause it or it is just something that came up out of no where?

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13 minutes ago, csmopar said:

so did an impact cause it or it is just something that came up out of no where?

 

Since I've never heard a word about any prior vascular (arterial) bleeding or tibial fracture, I would guess possibly a contusion or crushing of the soft tissue? I vaguely remember hearing from radio announcers he might have been kicked in his calf on a play?

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22 hours ago, ColtsBlueFL said:

 

Since I've never heard a word about any prior vascular (arterial) bleeding or tibial fracture, I would guess possibly a contusion or crushing of the soft tissue? I vaguely remember hearing from radio announcers he might have been kicked in his calf on a play?

 

That then leads to the question of whether or not anyone is equally likely to have it happen, or are there things that could make a person more susceptible to it than others?

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41 minutes ago, Chloe6124 said:

That was Jacob Eason. 


Lol!  I missed that.  I think Patmon is in most of Pittman’s videos.  Did you see the one where they went to Top Golf?

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7 minutes ago, Smonroe said:


Lol!  I missed that.  I think Patmon is in most of Pittman’s videos.  Did you see the one where they went to Top Golf?

Yeah. Patmon goes fishing a lot with Pitman. Seems the three of them are pretty close and hang out a lot.

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My daughter has had two surgeries for compartment syndrome. There was no trauma for her just incredibly large calf muscles. They literally took a pressure reading of each “compartment” much like a tire pressure reading. She had less than two inch incisions to release the fascia surrounding each muscle compartment that was affected. One required a “wedge” of fascia to be removed. Recovery was off season so not critical to her return to play. She was a collegiate softball player. 

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On 10/8/2020 at 5:26 PM, Shepman said:

Not trying to be negative but I find it irresponsible eating out in public.

Beautiful thing is that you dont have to.  If you think it's an unecessary risk, just stay home.  Stay safe the manner that best suits you.  Absolutely.

 

Out here though the world is still turning, and will continue to, when you're ready to reacclimate.

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