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4 minutes ago, Narcosys said:

 

Forget those malaria pills man. Terrible on your stomach and liver, especially mefloquine. Took those things on numerous occasions during deployments. 

 

ZPAK is the go to anti-viral, but handing them things out like candy help to develop viruses that are resistant, that's why they try to not give out so many. 

 

Isn't Zpak an antiobiotic course? Antibiotics don't work against viruses. Or am I thinking of something else?

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As much as I like the NFL and how it takes us away mentally from everyday problems this virus has to be contained at any cost. When you realize just how many people are effected with their jobs a

Meanwhile on Wall Street....    

Chances are you don’t know what you’re talking about. It is most not certainly going to be “done” in a month. 

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There's a very real possibility that 2020 will be cancelled. We will be dealing with this for years until or if a vaccine is found. 

 

From what virologists are telling us, we will be dealing with a similar situation to the Spanish Flu: Multiple waves of outbreak. 

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2 minutes ago, chad72 said:

 

Isn't Zpak an antiobiotic course? Antibiotics don't work against viruses. Or am I thinking of something else?

You are correct. But the idea is to take antibiotics once you have pneumonia to prevent a bacterial infection.  

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2 minutes ago, chad72 said:

 

Isn't Zpak an antiobiotic course? Antibiotics don't work against viruses. Or am I thinking of something else?

The reports from tests done in other countries is that it must be used in combination with the malaria drug.   That's the basis of Dr Funechi's claim that he wants more data before being clinically approved.  The combo is doing something they don't totally understand.

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6 minutes ago, Swan Ronson said:

.08 per cent of the UK population is 52,800. They have 5,683 cases. Your figures are miles off. They also have less then 300 deaths. Not 665.

ah yes, you are correct I missed the -5 and -4 exponentials

0.00008% UK

0.00010% US

 

So fairly even there. Higher for US because of the way we live with more densely populated cities. That is to be expected. UK has 281 total reported deaths, the way their tracker shows up on my computer is off, like it's not formatted properly. 

 

so looking at a 4.9% mortality rate for UK and a 1.3% mortality rate for the US. 

 

 

 

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6 minutes ago, RollerColt said:

There's a very real possibility that 2020 will be cancelled. We will be dealing with this for years until or if a vaccine is found. 

 

From what virologists are telling us, we will be dealing with a similar situation to the Spanish Flu: Multiple waves of outbreak. 

 

True. This is what I anticipate will happen. Places like Disney and other theme parks will open, say in June, after the curve is flattened a bit during April and May. Then, you have everyone dying to get out on their summer vacations, since spring break has been shot already. Then, the after effects of all those vacations, will be felt in the fall, for another smaller round we go through in winter and spring again till all the natural immunity and vaccine/drug immunity collectively kick in. So, truly, it will be till next summer before we see this virus impact being minimized on people and economies, IMO. 

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2 minutes ago, DougDew said:

The reports from tests done in other countries is that it must be used in combination with the malaria drug.   That's the basis of Dr Funechi's claim that he wants more data before being clinically approved.  The combo is doing something they don't totally understand.

 

it is believed that mefloquine can cause similar affects to TBI and was made the last choice for US personnel to use due to the potential permanent neurological side effects.  I'm telling ya my guy, that stuff sucks. If you are going to take it, take with a large meal, cause you'll have serious stomach pains if you don't. 

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Just now, chad72 said:

 

This is what I anticipate will happen. Places like Disney and other theme parks will open, say in June, after the curve is flattened a bit during April and May. Then, you have everyone dying to get out on their summer vacations, since spring break has been shot already. Then, the after effects of all those vacations, will be felt in the fall, for another smaller round we go through in winter and spring again till all the natural immunity and vaccine/drug immunity collectively kick in. So, truly, it will be till next summer before we see this virus impact being minimized on people and economies, IMO. 

That situation is actually playing out right now in Hong Kong. They started to reopen everything and another wave hit. 

 

I really hope we can eventually get natural immunity, but I'm cautious about that as well. 

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4 minutes ago, Narcosys said:

 

it is believed that mefloquine can cause similar affects to TBI and was made the last choice for US personnel to use due to the potential permanent neurological side effects.  I'm telling ya my guy, that stuff sucks. If you are going to take it, take with a large meal, cause you'll have serious stomach pains if you don't. 

The specific drug mentioned was Hydroxychloroquine.  Sounds nasty, but its better than your lungs being starved for oxygen, IMO.

 

Common hydroxychloroquine side effects may include:

headache, dizziness, ringing in your ears;

nausea, vomiting, stomach pain;

loss of appetite, weight loss;

mood changes, feeling nervous or irritable;

skin rash or itching; or.

hair loss.

 

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5 minutes ago, DougDew said:

The specific drug mentioned was Hydroxychloroquine.  Sounds nasty, but its better than your lungs being starved for oxygen, IMO.

 

Common hydroxychloroquine side effects may include:

headache, dizziness, ringing in your ears;

nausea, vomiting, stomach pain;

loss of appetite, weight loss;

mood changes, feeling nervous or irritable;

skin rash or itching; or.

hair loss.

 

 

Ya those were the, take daily pills, versus the mefloquine which was once a week. 

 

11 minutes ago, RollerColt said:

That situation is actually playing out right now in Hong Kong. They started to reopen everything and another wave hit. 

 

I really hope we can eventually get natural immunity, but I'm cautious about that as well. 

 

You should if you catch it. 

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14 minutes ago, Narcosys said:

ah yes, you are correct I missed the -5 and -4 exponentials

0.00008% UK

0.00010% US

 

So fairly even there. Higher for US because of the way we live with more densely populated cities. That is to be expected. UK has 281 total reported deaths, the way their tracker shows up on my computer is off, like it's not formatted properly. 

 

so looking at a 4.9% mortality rate for UK and a 1.3% mortality rate for the US. 

 

 

 

The US also has nearly 800 cases in serious or critical condition vs 20 for the UK so it's a bit early to be talking about mortality rates. 

 

Hopefully none of those people will die, but unfortunately a lot of them are going to.

 

Neither the US or the UK is handling this well.

 

An example of a country handling it well is South Korea which had huge numbers of tests per population and then isolated people who tested positive. They have been seeing a massive slow down in cases recently. As of a week ago they had tested 5200 per million inhabitants in contrast to the US which had tested 74 per million. 

 

Comparing the US and UK is two bald men fighting over a comb. Korea is the example to follow.

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Interestingly that Japan has escaped some of the headlines. 

 

Even though they are a densely populated country, very much so,  they don't seem to be having as much problems as NYC. 

 

Maybe the reporting of it is just not capturing attention.

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1 minute ago, DougDew said:

Interestingly that Japan has escaped some of the headlines. 

 

Even though they are a densely populated country, very much so,  they don't seem to be having as much problems as NYC. 

 

Maybe the reporting of it is just not capturing attention.

 

Or they aren't reporting their numbers as much. North Korea for example hasn't had  single case yet!

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31 minutes ago, Swan Ronson said:

 

Neither the US or the UK is handling this well.

 

An example of a country handling it well is South Korea which had huge numbers of tests per population and then isolated people who tested positive.

Its the United STATES of America.  States and municipalities have the authority to keep people from moving around more than the Federal Govt does.  AFAIK, South Korea has a national police force commanded from Seoul because they have a small country.  Our Federal Govt has no way to "handle" it the same way.

 

Again, the remedy for a positive test is to simply isolate, which any State or municipality can impose that on their entire constituents immediately

 

And testing merely confirms a person may be negative.  They can contract it the moment they walk out of the doctor's office.   Then I guess they should get tested three days later?  How many tests is a country of 330 million supposed to have on hand?  And how often should the Feds expect each person to need to be tested?

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1 hour ago, Narcosys said:

 

Forget those malaria pills man. Terrible on your stomach and liver, especially mefloquine. Took those things on numerous occasions during deployments. 

 

ZPAK is the go to anti-viral, but handing them things out like candy help to develop viruses that are resistant, that's why they try to not give out so many. 

There are forms of chloroquine that are not as harsh on the body and still have the similar effect of limiting the virus's ability to replicate. I imagine they are looking at these versions because their side effects are less severe and the drug is already being used to treat people with arthritis and lupus. I don't think the goal is to use them as a vaccine/cure long term but to at least stop the severity of the virus initially until a proper vaccine can be produced and distributed globally.

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34 minutes ago, DougDew said:

Its the United STATES of America.  States and municipalities have the authority to keep people from moving around more than the Federal Govt does.  AFAIK, South Korea has a national police force commanded from Seoul because they have a small country.  Our Federal Govt has no way to "handle" it the same way.

 

Again, the remedy for a positive test is to simply isolate, which any State or municipality can impose that on their entire constituents immediately

 

And testing merely confirms a person may be negative.  They can contract it the moment they walk out of the doctor's office.   Then I guess they should get tested three days later?  How many tests is a country of 330 million supposed to have on hand?  And how often should the Feds expect each person to need to be tested?

They can't impose complete isolation.  Most businesses are still open and people have to be able to go and get essential items

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On 3/19/2020 at 8:41 AM, ColtJax said:

The virus, like just about every other virus will die off when the weather gets warm. In fact the curve is already down with China reporting no new cases, and that's huge..

 

This virus is more like the first SARS (but hardier) virus, than influenza or H1N1 swine flu.  Singapore is nearly on the equator, suffered heavily to both of those previous outbreaks.  With each one, they update their health/travel policies, being better prepared for SARS-CoV-2.  More on them later.

 

On 3/19/2020 at 11:37 AM, chad72 said:

 

I am curious about heat and humidity together.

While it is not the deciding factor, I am keeping an eye on Mexico and countries closer to the equator where it is hot and humid, ...

 

 

And Singapore?  ;)

 

On 3/19/2020 at 12:48 PM, Chloe6124 said:

Come on. I suggest those that are so negative to shut the tv off and quit listening to the media who is panicking everyone. Chances are this does out in a month or so. 

 

If the measures we are taking work, it might.  The reason would be the ramp up in life saving equipment/ICU beds and a reduction to a big "Spike" in infections.  Flattening the curve, reducing demand for those life saving devices/beds, and not outnumbering what is available.

 

Here's some interesting history from Singapore, I've mentioned-

 

"This pandemic—the new disease Covid-19, the virus SARS-CoV-2—is not Singapore’s first epidemiological nightmare. In 2002 and 2003, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, the original SARS, tore out of China and through Asia, killing 33 people in Singapore and sparking wholesale revisions to the city-state’s public health system. “They realized they wanted to invest for the future, to reduce that economic cost if the same thing were to happen again,”

So Singapore instituted new travel controls and health infrastructure.

 

Then, in 2009, it got hit again—with H1N1 influenza, the so-called swine flu. “Pandemic flu came from Mexico, an Americas event, and Singapore tried to put in place in 2009 what they learned with SARS,” Hibberd says. “But flu was much more difficult to contain than SARS was, and they realized what they thought they’d learned didn’t work. It was another lesson.”

 

When Covid-19 came around, Singapore was, it seems, was ready. Along with Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan, and South Korea, Singapore instituted strict travel controls and protocols for identifying sick individuals.   --   All these governments instituted strict social distancing measures, like canceling events, closing schools, and telling people to stay home. As a result (at least in part), all have lower numbers of infected people and lower fatalities than China or Italy, proportionately. They “flattened the curve,” as public health experts now say—lowering a probable spike of infections, perhaps pushing that surge of seriously ill people further out in time so that health care systems don’t get overburdened."

 

And everyone can get the care necessary without running out of life saving devices/care workers/ICU beds.  Then, and when new infection rates start to drop, is when this may begin to blow over; IMHO.

 

And we may well completely altered policy for future outbreaks for the better.

 

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On 3/20/2020 at 9:21 AM, runthepost said:

South Korea was testing 50,000 a week in the beginning and we just recently passed that mark earlier this week.

 

See above.  ^^^

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3 hours ago, Narcosys said:

. It will be a minimal nuisance by the end of the summer.

No guarantee that's true.  People are getting it in warm dry climates now.  

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I don’t worry to much about the cases going up. With testing now that was going to happen. NY is so bad right now. With the subway and so much international travel it’s no wonder it is that bad. They are supposed to start the new drug tomorrow. If that proves to be effective we are in good shape because we will have a treatment. Things will be able to get back to normal.  The drug has already been approved for years for Lupus and other things so side effects are already known. 

 

You can’t keep people away from their right to work for long. It just won’t work. 

 

Personally my opinion is we are at the peak. Seems like this has been around since nov or dec in the states and we are just now realizing it. A lot of people have had these symptoms back in Dec and Jan and tested negative for the flu. If that’s the case we might be at the peak which is good news. 

 

 

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1 minute ago, aaron11 said:

No guarantee that's true.  People are getting it in warm dry climates now.  

Oh my goodness, I never said it will lessen transferability. If they are contracting them in the cities and markets, surfaces are being touched constantly by numerous people.

 

The climate has nothing to do with whether or not it can be transferred, it affects how long the virus can be viable for contraction on surfaces. 

 

Right now the virus can survive much longer on surfaces when it is cold, than when it is warm. You are just as likely to get it from coming into contact with surfaces that has the virus on it as you do with being in close proximity and contact with those that have it. 

 

 

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45 minutes ago, ColtsBlueFL said:

 

Here's some interesting history from Singapore, I've mentioned-

 

"This pandemic—the new disease Covid-19, the virus SARS-CoV-2—is not Singapore’s first epidemiological nightmare. In 2002 and 2003, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, the original SARS, tore out of China and through Asia, killing 33 people in Singapore and sparking wholesale revisions to the city-state’s public health system. “They realized they wanted to invest for the future, to reduce that economic cost if the same thing were to happen again,”

So Singapore instituted new travel controls and health infrastructure.

 

Then, in 2009, it got hit again—with H1N1 influenza, the so-called swine flu. “Pandemic flu came from Mexico, an Americas event, and Singapore tried to put in place in 2009 what they learned with SARS,” Hibberd says. “But flu was much more difficult to contain than SARS was, and they realized what they thought they’d learned didn’t work. It was another lesson.”

 

When Covid-19 came around, Singapore was, it seems, was ready. Along with Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan, and South Korea, Singapore instituted strict travel controls and protocols for identifying sick individuals.   --   All these governments instituted strict social distancing measures, like canceling events, closing schools, and telling people to stay home. As a result (at least in part), all have lower numbers of infected people and lower fatalities than China or Italy, proportionately. They “flattened the curve,” as public health experts now say—lowering a probable spike of infections, perhaps pushing that surge of seriously ill people further out in time so that health care systems don’t get overburdened."

 

And everyone can get the care necessary without running out of life saving devices/care workers/ICU beds.  Then, and when new infection rates start to drop, is when this may begin to blow over; IMHO.

 

And we may well completely altered policy for future outbreaks for the better.

 

 

Singapore has some serious surveillance tracking systems that identified someone down to the 600th person they may or may not have crossed paths with, I read on BBC in some article. A woman who took a taxi that may have been taken by a person who crossed paths with an infected person in a public area that did not show symptoms was called out of the blue by Singapore authorities and asked to quarantine herself. The next day, 2 policemen showed up at her door to let her know they are serious about it though the woman had no intentions of breaking quarantine. 

 

I do think they have some artificial/serious intelligence built into their surveillance that helped them get the relevant folks isolated much faster because they did not test nearly as many as South Korea early on except relying on their surveillance system. Plus, they are a little bit like China, with an authoritarian government that can mandate "quarantine or jails or fine" rules. Combine that with being a smaller country, they got to the bottom of it much faster. I have a cousin who works there, he shares a lot of stories as to how the authorities jumped in pretty early to start rationing supplies of sanitizers and toilet paper etc.

 

America's size and freedom is its own enemy in situations like these. China has the size but the freedom can be curtailed faster and having been the hotbed of several viruses already, there is some willingness on the part of people to do it voluntarily and faster as well.

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5 minutes ago, Narcosys said:

Oh my goodness, I never said it will lessen transferability. If they are contracting them in the cities and markets, surfaces are being touched constantly by numerous people.

 

The climate has nothing to do with whether or not it can be transferred, it affects how long the virus can be viable for contraction on surfaces. 

 

Right now the virus can survive much longer on surfaces when it is cold, than when it is warm. You are just as likely to get it from coming into contact with surfaces that has the virus on it as you do with being in close proximity and contact with those that have it. 

 

 

When it's warm here it will be cold in the south...  They have a lot Less people in that hemisphere but still plenty to keep it going and bring it back in a year

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9 minutes ago, aaron11 said:

When it's warm here it will be cold in the south...  They have a lot Less people in that hemisphere but still plenty to keep it going and bring it back in a year

Once we have a treatment we will be in very good shape. That means we won’t have to worry to much if we do get it. They are saying it might even work as a preventive like tameflu.  There was a story on tv today where a guy begged to be given the drug and they gave in. He was almost completely cured the next day.  A treatment will work until we get a vaccine.  

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Testing people that run fever or feel sick may be important, but testing healthy people isn't practical or reliable. South Korea tests 50K per day, but they have over 51 million people. It would take over 1000 days to test everyone, does that make sense? And if you take the test on Monday does that mean your clean on Tuesday? And if not what was the point of the test on Monday? Like I said, if you're running a high fever or feeling sick, sure, test away. But if you feel fine and especially if you're young and health, just be careful..

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10 hours ago, NFLfan said:

 

And you know they are doing enough? 

 

I know one for certain at least a few (and probably a lot more) are...

 

Philips to ramp up production of ventilators in coronavirus fight


https://tinyurl.com/yx6fjwto

 

Philips looking for workers to assemble badly needed ventilators


https://tinyurl.com/waqhbka

 

Chelmsford-based ventilator company Zoll ramping up production to battle coronavirus


https://tinyurl.com/wvn99j3

 

Ventec Life Systems could ramp up ventilator production fivefold if needed for coronavirus


https://tinyurl.com/qsgxwf9

 

and more...

 

8 hours ago, Narcosys said:

 

Forget those malaria pills man. Terrible on your stomach and liver, especially mefloquine. Took those things on numerous occasions during deployments. 

 

ZPAK is the go to anti-viral, but handing them things out like candy help to develop viruses that are resistant, that's why they try to not give out so many. 

 

anti-bacterial.

 

7 hours ago, chad72 said:

 

Isn't Zpak an antiobiotic course? Antibiotics don't work against viruses. Or am I thinking of something else?

 

Yes, you're right.  See below-

 

7 hours ago, RollerColt said:

You are correct. But the idea is to take antibiotics once you have pneumonia to prevent a bacterial infection.  

 

Yes, secondary bacterial infection is the aim of azithromycin (Z-Pak).  I think the screeners also need to be aware look for Cytokine Storm Syndrome in therapy, with hyperinflammation where some type of  immunosuppression might be helpful.

 

"A cytokine storm is an overproduction of immune cells and their activating compounds (cytokines), which, in a flu infection, is often associated with a surge of activated immune cells into the lungs. The resulting lung inflammation and fluid buildup can lead to respiratory distress and can be contaminated by a secondary bacterial pneumonia -- often enhancing the mortality in patients."

 

7 hours ago, Swan Ronson said:

The US also has nearly 800 cases in serious or critical condition vs 20 for the UK so it's a bit early to be talking about mortality rates. 

 

Hopefully none of those people will die, but unfortunately a lot of them are going to.

 

Neither the US or the UK is handling this well.

 

An example of a country handling it well is South Korea which had huge numbers of tests per population and then isolated people who tested positive. They have been seeing a massive slow down in cases recently. As of a week ago they had tested 5200 per million inhabitants in contrast to the US which had tested 74 per million. 

 

Comparing the US and UK is two bald men fighting over a comb. Korea is the example to follow.

 

See my story about Singapore, South Korea, and Japan above.

 

7 hours ago, DougDew said:

Interestingly that Japan has escaped some of the headlines. 

 

Even though they are a densely populated country, very much so,  they don't seem to be having as much problems as NYC. 

 

Maybe the reporting of it is just not capturing attention.

 

Same, they, Singapore and South Korea stories are above.

 

I'm more concerned the healthcare worker get the PPE they need.  I think America steps up.

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5 hours ago, Narcosys said:

 

Let's be honest, you guys have been doing that before this situation.

 

Like do you have any actual evidence of this, or let me rephrase, do you understand what you just implied?

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I'm not going to engage further because you know what, I know the posters involved and forget leading to water.... some people will just ignore things that don't fit in with their own version of reality. 

 

I'm directly involved in this, it's bloody serious. Anyone thinking you're at the "peak" yet doesn't understand the data whatsoever. 

 

I might be a tad grumpy, because hey, surprisingly dealing with lots of grim stuff and not sleeping much right now. Strange that. 

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46 minutes ago, ColtsBlueFL said:

 

 

Yes, secondary bacterial infection is the aim of azithromycin (Z-Pak).  I think the screeners also need to be aware look for Cytokine Storm Syndrome, with hyperinflammation where some type of  immunosuppression might be helpful.

 

"A cytokine storm is an overproduction of immune cells and their activating compounds (cytokines), which, in a flu infection, is often associated with a surge of activated immune cells into the lungs. The resulting lung inflammation and fluid buildup can lead to respiratory distress and can be contaminated by a secondary bacterial pneumonia -- often enhancing the mortality in patients."

 

Yes, that's what I'm reading, if I understand it correctly. 

 

People are dying from covid-19 because of lung tissue inflammation more so than drowning in fluid (pneumonia).  Older people and people with underlying health conditions already have an immune system that's on high alert.  When it detects the presence of covid-19, their bodies get flooded with antibodies and inflammation to the lungs. 

 

Children's systems take the presence of the virus in stride, and approach it more gently than in older or compromised people. They can then battle it over time to where the immune system eventually wins. 

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5 hours ago, Narcosys said:

 

lol, working for NHS but condescendingly talking about response?

:pkb:

 

 

Yes I am, and nice to see your appreciation for it... 

 

There's two levels or response we can talk about here. The purely medical services and the overall government societal measure. Which one do you want to attack using faulty data first?

 

 

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3 minutes ago, DougDew said:

Yes, that's what I'm reading, if I understand it correctly. 

 

People are dying from covid-19 because of lung tissue inflammation more so than drowning in fluid (pneumonia).  Older people and people with underlying health conditions already have an immune system that's on high alert.  When it detects the presence of covid-19, their bodies gets flooded with antibodies and inflammation to the lungs. 

 

Children's systems take the presence of the virus in stride, and approach it more gently than in older or compromised people. They can battle it over time to where the immune system eventually wins. 

 

This is actually a concern for another reason now, for example:

 

https://www.edgehealth.co.uk/post/covid19march2020

 

Basically asymptomatic but still very capable of infecting. 

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Just now, SteelCityColt said:

 

This is actually a concern for another reason now, for example:

 

https://www.edgehealth.co.uk/post/covid19march2020

 

Basically asymptomatic but still very capable of infecting. 

Yes.  Its like the virus was almost engineered...uh...I mean evolved to take out older people (like government leaders) and uses children as the carrier.  Just to fuel conspiracy theories of course.

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5 minutes ago, DougDew said:

Yes.  Its like the virus was almost engineered...uh...I mean evolved to take out older people (like government leaders) and uses children as the carrier.  Just to fuel conspiracy theories of course.

 

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/the-new-coronavirus-was-not-genetically-engineered-study-shows

 

"More specifically, the authors of the new research looked at two components of spike proteins: the receptor-binding domain (RBD), which latches onto healthy host cells, and the cleavage site, which opens up the virus and allows it to penetrate the host cell.

 

To bind to human cells, spike proteins need a receptor on human cells called angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2).

 

The scientists found that the receptor-binding domain of the spike protein had evolved to target ACE2 so effectively that it could only have been the result of natural selection and not of genetic engineering.

 

If scientists had engineered the new coronavirus purposely as a pathogen, explain the researchers, the starting point would likely have been the backbone of another virus in the coronavirus family.

 

However, the backbone of SARS-CoV-2 was very different than those of other coronaviruses and was most similar to related viruses in bats and pangolins.

 

“These two features of the virus — the mutations in the RBD portion of the spike protein and its distinct backbone — rule out laboratory manipulation as a potential origin for SARS-CoV-2."

 

Unfortunately a rare, but natural occurrence.

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10 minutes ago, ColtsBlueFL said:

 

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/the-new-coronavirus-was-not-genetically-engineered-study-shows

 

"More specifically, the authors of the new research looked at two components of spike proteins: the receptor-binding domain (RBD), which latches onto healthy host cells, and the cleavage site, which opens up the virus and allows it to penetrate the host cell.

 

To bind to human cells, spike proteins need a receptor on human cells called angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2).

 

The scientists found that the receptor-binding domain of the spike protein had evolved to target ACE2 so effectively that it could only have been the result of natural selection and not of genetic engineering.

 

If scientists had engineered the new coronavirus purposely as a pathogen, explain the researchers, the starting point would likely have been the backbone of another virus in the coronavirus family.

 

However, the backbone of SARS-CoV-2 was very different than those of other coronaviruses and was most similar to related viruses in bats and pangolins.

 

“These two features of the virus — the mutations in the RBD portion of the spike protein and its distinct backbone — rule out laboratory manipulation as a potential origin for SARS-CoV-2."

 

Unfortunately a rare, but natural occurrence.

Thanks. I've read that before.  I was just throwing out a bone for the discussion. 

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1 hour ago, DougDew said:

Thanks. I've read that before.  I was just throwing out a bone for the discussion. 

 

The only market indices that have moved to the positive are that of China. Another conspiracy theory is China knew about it and how big it would get and let it get big knowing it could contain it. All the money it lost in the US trade war, it got back, probably buying stocks on the cheap now.

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4 hours ago, ColtsBlueFL said:

know one for certain at least a few (and probably a lot more) are...

 

Philips to ramp up production of ventilators in coronavirus fight


https://tinyurl.com/yx6fjwto

 

Philips looking for workers to assemble badly needed ventilators


https://tinyurl.com/waqhbka

 

Chelmsford-based ventilator company Zoll ramping up production to battle coronavirus


https://tinyurl.com/wvn99j3

 

Ventec Life Systems could ramp up ventilator production fivefold if needed for coronavirus


https://tinyurl.com/qsgxwf9

 

I'm happy to hear that. We also need to manufacture more supplies like masks and gloves too. 

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3 hours ago, SteelCityColt said:

I'm not going to engage further because you know what, I know the posters involved and forget leading to water.... some people will just ignore things that don't fit in with their own version of reality. 

 

I'm directly involved in this, it's bloody serious. Anyone thinking you're at the "peak" yet doesn't understand the data whatsoever. 

 

I might be a tad grumpy, because hey, surprisingly dealing with lots of grim stuff and not sleeping much right now. Strange that. 

 

A lot of us appreciate what you are sharing. We are learning a lot and it is promoting awareness. Those that don't want to be informed won't get anything out of it, but most of us do. Please continue to engage and keep us informed. Thanks, SCC.

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8 hours ago, dgambill said:

There are some people that don't understand that in a case like this...over-reaction will be what saves lives and brings this to an end sooner.

 

Exactly. Many say that there won't be that many deaths from COVID-19 and that it is no different from the flu. It is because of the drastic measures ("overreaction") that more people won't die. 

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1 hour ago, chad72 said:

The only market indices that have moved to the positive are that of China. Another conspiracy theory is China knew about it and how big it would get and let it get big knowing it could contain it. All the money it lost in the US trade war, it got back, probably buying stocks on the cheap now.

 

I feel like I'm living in a real-life a conspiracy theory...  :(

 

I overheard a person on the phone today saying humans brought this on themselves by naming themselves "kings of the earth" and "sitting on the throne of Gods' kingdom".  :loco:  I've heard people talking about "the government trying to cull the population with corona" or other countries "attacking the US with corona".  :nutz:

 

I've read a number of fictional books in the past where the villain tries to revert humans back to animals with an airborne pathogen or releases nanobots into the atmosphere to attack all the other races but their own.  

 

It almost wouldn't surprise me at this point to find out we're living in a time where fact is stranger than fiction...  Not necessarily biological warfare, but certain factions taking advantage of a global pandemic for financial gain.  :thinking:

 

This situation seems to be bringing out the best in the good people and the worst in the bad people...  :(

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    • FWIW I thought this from last weeks mail bag was funny because it seems to support what both you and I are saying.  If what I understand your point being is the dline including Buckner played similarly well both games and my belief that 3techs don’t need to record sacks and tfls to be dominant. : “I can understand why fans who watched last Sunday's opener against the Jaguars, and then checked out the box score afterwards, might come away with the conclusion that DeForest Buckner didn't have much of an impact on the game. After all, the Colts traded away their 13th-overall pick in this year's NFL Draft to acquire Buckner, and then immediately handed him a huge contract extension, so expectations are high. I get that. But looking back at the film, I think what's evident is Buckner deserves a little bit more credit beyond his stat-sheet line of six tackles (one for a loss). As the defensive line started to gel in the second half — that's when it limited Jacksonville to six combined rushing yards and had three of its four sacks — you began to feel Buckner much more consistently, and the attention placed on him allowed for others (I thought linebacker Bobby Okereke was fantastic in the second half) to make plays. Buckner also had the eighth-best week among all NFL interior defensive linemen in run stop win rate in Week 1, according to ESPN. Now, moving forward, of course you want to see more of those impact-type plays out of Buckner — sacks, big run stuffs, forced fumbles, defensive touchdowns, etc. But I think it's also important to to remember there are other ways for the three-tech to impact the game, and Buckner did a pretty good job of that last Sunday.”  
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