Four2itus

NFL vs Colin K settled

Recommended Posts

14 minutes ago, Myles said:

Interesting article from Aug of 2018. 

 

SBN: If the NFL was to settle, does that mean they’ve basically admitted guilt or that they felt like they could not win in this situation?

Thomas: It doesn’t necessarily mean they are admitting guilt. They just may want to make it all go away. Also, they may just want to save money. The process and the amount of money that they may have to spend depending this collusion claim may end up being an astronomical amount to the point that it may be cheaper for them to settle. That may be the reason why as well. But, no, just because they settle doesn’t mean they are admitting guilt. There could be a myriad of other reasons.

 

https://www.sbnation.com/nfl/2018/8/31/17803884/colin-kaepernick-nfl-collusion-case-explained

 

This was written last year. I am almost certain that the person who wrote/said that did not believe that the NFL would settle and award Kaep and Reid $60 to $80 million? That is not chump change. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is what stinks.....and it smells. 

 

Evidence destroyed by the league about video taping.

Brady's cell phone destroyed.

Collusion case settled out of court which is subject to a confidentiality agreement

 

Anyone can spray perfume on these instances, but they still smell...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, NFLfan said:

 

This was written last year. I am almost certain that the person who wrote/said that did not believe that the NFL would settle and award Kaep and Reid $60 to $80 million? That is not chump change. 

It is chump change when you break it down to 32 owners.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

95% of suits are settled.   It's not odd.  Just usually the best way to end it.   

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, crazycolt1 said:

It is chump change when you break it down to 32 owners.

 

So?

 

He received a large settlement. It sets a very bad precedent for the NFL.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, Myles said:

95% of suits are settled.   It's not odd.  Just usually the best way to end it.   

Do you have a link to that statistic? I'm guessing that isn't accurate

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
42 minutes ago, crazycolt1 said:

It is chump change when you break it down to 32 owners.

Not when you consider every player that feels slighted will now be looking to bring a suit against the league

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/17/2019 at 10:27 AM, jvan1973 said:

The cost to the NFL for the settlement is 80 million.   It doesn't matter how much of that Kap will get.    

 

The year and a half battle against Brady and the patriots cost the league about 15 million dollars.   A far cry from 80

In reality we don't know what the cost of the settlement is, it's just speculation that it is in the 60-80 million range

 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, Coffeedrinker said:

In reality we don't know what the cost of the settlement is, it's just speculation that it is in the 60-80 million range

 

It was a lot.   They wouldn't have settled otherwise

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Myles said:

Lots of opinions in here and very few facts.  

"And lets be real here, this is phony outrage at its best. I know nobody who actually stopped watching the NFL because of this, and you dont either.  "

I actually know several who stopped.   Well, at least 4.   I didn't, but I never claimed I would.  

 

"The fact is, there is no way the NFL settles this if there is any chance they can win"

That is NOT a fact.   If the NFL thought there was even a chance they could lose, settling for what is to them, pennies is the wise choice.  

 

 

And those 4 people likely spent no money on the NFL and are the casualest of fans. 

 

You cant tell me that 4 die hard fans that went to games and bought merch washed their hands of the NFL over a few players kneeling. Thats preposterous.

 

Revenue is up, both locally for the teams and for the league itself.

 

He hasnt hurt the league at all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, NFLfan said:

 

Do you recall the basketball player Chris Jackson who became a Muslim? He prayed exactly how you are recommending. That outraged people. I think he said something about the flag standing for "tyranny". That is all I remember but that guy was blackballed. He had been a pretty good player before that, IIRC. I think he played for the Nuggets. 

He was an excellent player.

 

And the ironic part of all that was it was during the first gulf war, but americans didnt want to hear anything he had to say, and the problems in the middle east continued to escalate. Maybe if they get off their high horse about a flag they wouldve been more educated on whats going on there and averted millions of future deaths in the region due to our conflict. 

 

And this is coming from someone whose grandfather served in WWII and receieved 2 purple hearts. It isnt about respect for people who served its about shutting up people who dont go along with the nonsense. 

 

 

  • Confused 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, GoatBeard said:

And those 4 people likely spent no money on the NFL and are the casualest of fans. 

 

You cant tell me that 4 die hard fans that went to games and bought merch washed their hands of the NFL over a few players kneeling. Thats preposterous.

 

Revenue is up, both locally for the teams and for the league itself.

 

He hasnt hurt the league at all.

The NFL doesn't make it's money by fans buying tickets.  The NFL makes it's money from negotiating the contracts with the TV/Radio stations.  And last year ratings were down and dropped just about every week and that was in large part because of players kneeling.  But since the NFL negotiated those contracts before Kap started kneeling it will not have an effect on the current contracts but it very well could have an effect of the next contract which is next year.  Additionally the average NFL team worth grew about 2%, the smallest increase since 2011.

 

So if you don't think Kap has had an effect of revenue and future revenue, you're not really looking at the whole picture.

 

And yes, I've known several die hard football fans that have quit going to games, buying season tickets and watching the games on TV.  Many of them gave all their NFL merchandise to Goodwill or other places, one guy was too cheap to just give the stuff away, so he kept it but turned everything inside out.

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, GoatBeard said:

He was an excellent player.

 

And the ironic part of all that was it was during the first gulf war, but americans didnt want to hear anything he had to say, and the problems in the middle east continued to escalate. Maybe if they get off their high horse about a flag they wouldve been more educated on whats going on there and averted millions of future deaths in the region due to our conflict. 

You think you're educated about the subject and yet you call it "our conflict".  But I guess during the first Gulf War the US should have stood back and watch a dictator commit genocide against and a friendly nation.

Quote

 

And this is coming from someone whose grandfather served in WWII and receieved 2 purple hearts. It isnt about respect for people who served its about shutting up people who dont go along with the nonsense. 

 

 

Coming from someone who served in the 1st Gulf War, kneeling during the national anthem is the same as spitting in the face of all of us who serve, so not only can the know nothings like Kap and (some posters on this forum) protest in whatever stupid way they want to protest but so people from other countries can have those same freedoms and not be killed en masse by a ruthless dictator.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, NFLfan said:

That outraged people.

 

2 hours ago, Valpo2004 said:

It would have been considered "offensive" in one way or another no matter what they did.

 

I don't know what the answer is.  Unless we can magically make everyone do a Freaky Friday switch-a-roo to make them see things from the other sides' perspective.  :dunno:

 

Civil rights will always be an issue to people that feel like second-class citizens.  And rightly so.

 

And others will always want to avoid the issue and be outraged when athletes use their platform to bring attention to it.  And I can sympathize with people wanting sports entertainment to be an "escape" from these sorts of real-world problems.

 

I just wish everyone would get along.  :grouphug:

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
44 minutes ago, GoatBeard said:

And those 4 people likely spent no money on the NFL and are the casualest of fans. 

 

You cant tell me that 4 die hard fans that went to games and bought merch washed their hands of the NFL over a few players kneeling. Thats preposterous.

 

Revenue is up, both locally for the teams and for the league itself.

 

He hasnt hurt the league at all.

They are 4 people who would watch the NFL and maybe attend 1 game every 2 years.   

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, jvan1973 said:

It was a lot.   They wouldn't have settled otherwise

So Kaepernick did have his price?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, crazycolt1 said:

So Kaepernick did have his price?

Apparently.    

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, crazycolt1 said:

Personally I don't think this whole thing started as a protest. I think he was sitting and pouting over being benched. Then all of a sudden this come up and he ran with it.

Before the whole kneeling b.s. I remember he just sat on the beach with his headphones, right after he was benched during the national anthem. To me it looked extremely disrespectful. In my mind kneeling seems a little more respectful but it totally seems like he was just throwing a fit in the beginning. I totally agree with you.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Coffeedrinker said:

You think you're educated about the subject and yet you call it "our conflict".  But I guess during the first Gulf War the US should have stood back and watch a dictator commit genocide against and a friendly nation.

Coming from someone who served in the 1st Gulf War, kneeling during the national anthem is the same as spitting in the face of all of us who serve, so not only can the know nothings like Kap and (some posters on this forum) protest in whatever stupid way they want to protest but so people from other countries can have those same freedoms and not be killed en masse by a ruthless dictator.

Thank you for your service!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I for one am very disappointed that the nfl gave this * a cent. The national anthem is a moment that all Americans unite and pay respect to those who sacrificed their lives to keep this great country free. It is not a time for some drama queen to preach his political agenda in some half *** attempt to stay relevant in the nfl after being benched in favor of blaine Gabbert. I hope he never sees an nfl Field again.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Coffeedrinker said:

You think you're educated about the subject and yet you call it "our conflict".  But I guess during the first Gulf War the US should have stood back and watch a dictator commit genocide against and a friendly nation.

Coming from someone who served in the 1st Gulf War, kneeling during the national anthem is the same as spitting in the face of all of us who serve, so not only can the know nothings like Kap and (some posters on this forum) protest in whatever stupid way they want to protest but so people from other countries can have those same freedoms and not be killed en masse by a ruthless dictator.

While your service is greatly appreciated, there are many others who have served who believe the very reason why they serve is so Kaep can do this peaceful protest with his first amendment rights.  In fact, it was an army veteran who suggested that Kaep kneel in the first place

 

https://ftw.usatoday.com/2018/05/nfl-49ers-colin-kaepernick-national-anthem-protest-nate-boyer

 

 

3 minutes ago, HectorRoberts said:

I for one am very disappointed that the nfl gave this * a cent. The national anthem is a moment that all Americans unite and pay respect to those who sacrificed their lives to keep this great country free. It is not a time for some drama queen to preach his political agenda in some half *** attempt to stay relevant in the nfl after being benched in favor of blaine Gabbert. I hope he never sees an nfl Field again.

1) The NFL gave him money because they did something wrong.  They didn't just give him a gift out of nowhere

2) See above.  Many service members were very supportive of Kaep's decision

3) Those who sacrificed their lives did so in order to maintain and uphold the principles that America values, including freedom of speech and freedom to protest peacefully.

 

https://theundefeated.com/features/an-open-letter-from-american-military-veterans-in-support-of-colin-kaepernick/

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You know what I wish? I wish the NFL had never taken money from the military and suggested they go out on the sideline for the Anthem. If that hadn't occurred, this conversation very well might not be taking place. 

 

In 2015, Sen. John McCain and Sen. John Flake released a joint oversight report on what they called the “paid patriotism,” saying the Department of Defense gave as much as $6.8 million in taxpayer money to professional sports teams to honor the military at games and events over the past four years. McCain criticized the move in a statement at the time, saying, “Fans should have confidence that their hometown heroes are being honored because of their honorable military service, not as a marketing ploy.”

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, crazycolt1 said:

Personally I don't think this whole thing started as a protest. I think he was sitting and pouting over being benched. Then all of a sudden this come up and he ran with it.

Unfortunately I agree with this. I still maintain he used the wrong platform to protest racial inequality as well. Kneeling for the anthem and on the Football field = wrong platform, JMO. Now he is getting millions from the NFL and hasn't played a down since 2016 - only in america I guess lmao 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So does Kaep's thoughts on people of color being oppressed still stand now that he took 60-80 million from the NFL in a settlement? Or did the money make that go away?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, pgt_rob said:

So does Kaep's thoughts on people of color being oppressed still stand now that he took 60-80 million from the NFL in a settlement? Or did the money make that go away?

 

He's feeling much better.....

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, 2006Coltsbestever said:

Unfortunately I agree with this. I still maintain he used the wrong platform to protest racial inequality as well. Kneeling for the anthem and on the Football field = wrong platform, JMO. Now he is getting millions from the NFL and hasn't played a down since 2016 - only in america I guess lmao 

 

I can see it from both sides. If I start yelling about government at work and it won't go over well. I'll probably get fired & rightfully so. But there was a need to draw attention to the issues at hand

 

There is no simple one-sided answer

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, shakedownstreet said:

 

I can see it from both sides. If I start yelling about government at work and it won't go over well. I'll probably get fired & rightfully so. But there was a need to draw attention to the issues at hand

 

There is no simple one-sided answer

But you just showed that there is a simple answer.  

DON'T DO IT AT WORK

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Myles said:

But you just showed that there is a simple answer.  

DON'T DO IT AT WORK

 

 

 

No I disagree. It only drew the attention it did due to the platform. It's not so simple

 

The NFL is a different beast

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, shakedownstreet said:

 

No I disagree. It only drew the attention it did due to the platform. It's not so simple

 

The NFL is a different beast

He brought controversy to his employer. 

He made his employers Veterans Day celebration about himself.

He brought police hate (pig socks) to his employer.

He brought Cuban American hate (Castro shirt) to his employer.

 

Like you said, most of us would be fired immediately.   He wasn't.   He got opportunities with at least 2 NFL teams after doing all that.    

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Lucky Colts Fan said:

 

 

I don't know what the answer is.  Unless we can magically make everyone do a Freaky Friday switch-a-roo to make them see things from the other sides' perspective.  :dunno:

 

Civil rights will always be an issue to people that feel like second-class citizens.  And rightly so.

 

And others will always want to avoid the issue and be outraged when athletes use their platform to bring attention to it.  And I can sympathize with people wanting sports entertainment to be an "escape" from these sorts of real-world problems.

 

I just wish everyone would get along.  :grouphug:

 

Unfortunately there is no answer which leads to everyone getting along and there are very few escapes from the real world problems.   Because these real world problems that many of us just see on TV are real life for a lot of people.

 

I'll give you an example hopefully without being too political.  I have 3 kids, 2 of them have autism.  My sons are receiving clinical therapy and will likely soon be receiving ABA therapy.  (we are on a waiting list) 

 

You can google this but ABA therapy generally costs between $46,000 and $60,000 per year for 1 person (I have 2).   I don't have that kind of money. . . that is more than full tuition with no financial aid at Harvard.  And the thing is you can get loans for full tuition at Harvard (but most who need that would receive aid and not have to pay full tuition.)  But you can not get loans for ABA therapy.  And I don't think I need to tell you that not a lot of people have the 46k to drop for a year of ABA therapy for one kid on hand much less the money to drop for 2 kids.  

 

Fortunately the law currently allows for the tax payers to help with that.  My cousin also had a daughter with autism who needed ABA therapy before that law existed.  She and her husband sold their house to try to get her one year of ABA therapy.  Then her daughter died of an un-diagnosed brain tumor, age 8.  To be fair, nothing would have saved her daughters life but I did mention this to give the full story of what happened.   

 

Now if my kids don't receive ABA therapy they go to special ed classes at school, they require us to take care of them until we are too old to do so, then they live out the rest of their days at a group home similar to the one my wife works at.  If they do. . . living a full independent life for them is entirely possible, maybe even romantic relationships, marriage, children. . . Maybe, it's possible but likely not realistic  This is a reality that I face every minute of my life.  It's not one I can escape.  

 

There are however a lot of people that want to do away with the law effectively resigning my children to a life dependent upon their parents and then later dependent upon a group home.  

 

So yeah look I would like to get along with people and all.  But I don't get to escape this problem and it's hard for me to get along with someone who advocates this kind of thing.  Because when I hear that all I hear is someone saying "Forget your kids, I don't care"

 

For Colin K and others.  This is the life they live every single day.  It's not one they get to escape either.  

 

Politics sucks quite frankly.  It's a nasty business.  It isn't easy.  Because with a vote you can make a person's life much much better or you could end all of their hopes and dreams for themselves and for their children.   

 

The people who have the luxury to look at politics as just something that might affect their pocketbook a little bit or something very theoretical that they can escape from if only players would stop kneeling at football games.  Those are some very blessed people.  Quite frankly I'd like to go back to that myself.  But I had kids and those days are over for me.  Colin and others never got a single day of that in their lives.  Odds are as my kids get older they won't get that either because as soon as they are old enough to understand the concept they will come to realize that they will have to fight twice as hard as most others to get anything.  At least I had that while I was young.  

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Coffeedrinker said:

You think you're educated about the subject and yet you call it "our conflict".  But I guess during the first Gulf War the US should have stood back and watch a dictator commit genocide against and a friendly nation.

Coming from someone who served in the 1st Gulf War, kneeling during the national anthem is the same as spitting in the face of all of us who serve, so not only can the know nothings like Kap and (some posters on this forum) protest in whatever stupid way they want to protest but so people from other countries can have those same freedoms and not be killed en masse by a ruthless dictator.

wth? We killed over 1 million Iraqis in the 2nd gulf war. I bet you dont see that as a genocide tho. 

 

 

And thats just your personal opinion on the kneeling. The problem is you clearly dont think anyone else who served is entitled to one, and most dont feel that way. 

 

 

Another thing: dont you dare compare yourself to my grandfather. He was an actual hero. A combat medic with 2 purple hearts.

 

And not one time did he ever use his service to make himself out to be better than everyone else. They dont make them like that anymore. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, GoatBeard said:

wth? We killed over 1 million Iraqis in the 2nd gulf war. I bet you dont see that as a genocide tho. 

 

 

And thats just your personal opinion on the kneeling. The problem is you clearly dont think anyone else who served is entitled to one, and most dont feel that way. 

 

 

Another thing: dont you dare compare yourself to my grandfather. He was an actual hero. A combat medic with 2 purple hearts.

 

And not one time did he ever use his service to make himself out to be better than everyone else. They dont make them like that anymore. 

 

I have news for you. There are 10 times as many vets who disagree with the kneeling than those who don't have a problem with it.

What does your grandfather have to do with this? I am a vet with a purple heart that I received from my time in Vietnam and my opinion means just as much as yours or anyone else.

You have wrote these mini novels just for arguments sake.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, GoatBeard said:

wth? We killed over 1 million Iraqis in the 2nd gulf war. I bet you dont see that as a genocide tho. . 

 

No,   no we didn't.    Not even close.   Also,  casualties of war and genocide aren't nearly the same

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, pgt_rob said:

So does Kaep's thoughts on people of color being oppressed still stand now that he took 60-80 million from the NFL in a settlement? Or did the money make that go away?

And I thought he said it wasn't about the money but yet he had his price.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, crazycolt1 said:

And I thought he said it wasn't about the money but yet he had his price.

 

Apparently he did. He's probably laughing his butt off as he's staring at his bank account. I'd be curious to see if he still pushes the same ideas or if he's going to drop it all together now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, pgt_rob said:

 

Apparently he did. He's probably laughing his butt off as he's staring at his bank account. I'd be curious to see if he still pushes the same ideas or if he's going to drop it all together now.

 

I'd have to guess such a hefty payout would include a 'back off' clause.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, 21isSuperman said:

While your service is greatly appreciated, there are many others who have served who believe the very reason why they serve is so Kaep can do this peaceful protest with his first amendment rights.  In fact, it was an army veteran who suggested that Kaep kneel in the first place

 

https://ftw.usatoday.com/2018/05/nfl-49ers-colin-kaepernick-national-anthem-protest-nate-boyer

I said, one of the reasons I served is so people can protest.  I also said that I served so other people around the world can start to get the same freedoms.

 

And I've read the story and this may come as a shock, but I don't agree with everyone that has every worn the uniform.  So, having an veteran tell Kap that is proper is not something I agree with.

16 hours ago, 21isSuperman said:

 

 

1) The NFL gave him money because they did something wrong.  They didn't just give him a gift out of nowhere

2) See above.  Many service members were very supportive of Kaep's decision

3) Those who sacrificed their lives did so in order to maintain and uphold the principles that America values, including freedom of speech and freedom to protest peacefully.

 

https://theundefeated.com/features/an-open-letter-from-american-military-veterans-in-support-of-colin-kaepernick/

I never once said Kap did not have the right to protest, I just disagree with his method.  Many people and some vets have stated that flag burning is an acceptable protest as well.  Also one I disagree with and to me, kneeling during the Anthem and flag burning are very similar protests.

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, GoatBeard said:

wth? We killed over 1 million Iraqis in the 2nd gulf war. I bet you dont see that as a genocide tho. 

That number is just not true.  Most credible estimates range it from 110,000 to 400,000 and considering that it was; more than the US there and it's a kill or be killed situation no that is not genocide.

2 hours ago, GoatBeard said:

 

 

And thats just your personal opinion on the kneeling. The problem is you clearly dont think anyone else who served is entitled to one, and most dont feel that way. 

Yes, it's my personal opinion and no, I never said that anyone else who served (or not served) is not entitled to a different opinion.  But the thing is I have the right to support or not support people and organizations based on their beliefs.  And if the NFL had kept treating the kneeling situation like they did the first year, I would have stopped supporting the NFL.

 

But nice try, I do find it funny that those who are usually the least tolerant of differing opinions are usually the ones that accuse others of not allowing differing opinions.

2 hours ago, GoatBeard said:

 

 

Another thing: dont you dare compare yourself to my grandfather. He was an actual hero. A combat medic with 2 purple hearts.

If that's true, good for him.  But I'm not going to congratulate someone based on your word.

2 hours ago, GoatBeard said:

 

And not one time did he ever use his service to make himself out to be better than everyone else. They dont make them like that anymore. 

 

I never did that either, but that fact that is what you want to claim says a lot about you.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, GoatBeard said:

wth? We killed over 1 million Iraqis in the 2nd gulf war. I bet you dont see that as a genocide tho. 

 

 

And thats just your personal opinion on the kneeling. The problem is you clearly dont think anyone else who served is entitled to one, and most dont feel that way. 

 

 

Another thing: dont you dare compare yourself to my grandfather. He was an actual hero. A combat medic with 2 purple hearts.

 

And not one time did he ever use his service to make himself out to be better than everyone else. They dont make them like that anymore. 

 

 

As a working member of the news media during the most recent Iraqi war, I can assure with confidence that the numbers you floated aren't even close to reality.     Seriously,  not close.

 

And you don't have to take my word for it.    

 

For discussion's sake,  let's say the numbers were true....    here's what would have happened,  but didn't.      The morgue in every Iraqi city would've been full all the time.     Never happened.

 

There would have been protests about that....   I'm talking about large, mass protests in the streets.      Never happened.

 

There would be riots in the street.      Never happened.

 

There would be U.N. Inspectors making the claims.     Never happened.     

 

None of the things that would have happened if the loss of life was even close to the numbers you tossed about ever happened.     Not at all.

 

There was a group...   I think they did a study...   I think it was called the Lancet study.    They claimed 665,000 dead.     And that claim easily fell apart.    They admitted they opposed the war and were willing to give out false info (lie) in order to shape public opinion.  

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lancet_surveys_of_Iraq_War_casualties

 

One other important point about this study....   even the Iraqi government doesn't support the findings of this study.    They claim much smaller numbers of killed during the war.    The study completely lacks all credibility.    Honestly.

 

What happened to most Iraqi's who disappeared?     They left when the war happened.   The moved elsewhere in the Middle East.    Or they moved to Europe.    Or they moved to the United States.    They just up and left.  

 

Remember,  much of the killing in Iraq wasn't done by the United States.    It was done by those who opposed us.    Suicide bombers and such.     They were trying to kill as many innocents as possible.     U.S. servicemen and women were trying to limit casualties.     There's the difference between the two sides.

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.