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Bucky Brooks Top Ten Prospects By Position


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Top Ten Offensive Linemen ( http://www.nfl.com/n...uo-lead-the-way )

1. Matt Kalil*, USC, OT, (6-7, 295): Kalil is the most polished offensive tackle in college football. He possesses unique skills to match his imposing frame and shows all of the signs of blossoming into an all-star caliber player at the next level. He was so respected by the USC coaching staff as a left tackle that they kept current Cowboys tackle Tyron Smith on the right side despite his extraordinary talent.

2. Riley Reiff*, Iowa, OT (6-6, 300): Reiff could be the next dominant Iowa offensive tackle to make an immediate impact in the NFL. He combines exceptional physical tools with a refined game that allows him to dominate defenders on the edge. Reiff's value is helped given the success of

Bryan Bulaga and other ex-Hawkeye linemen.

3. Jonathan Martin*, Stanford, OT (6-6, 304): Martin could be the most athletic edge blocker in college football. As a natural left tackle with outstanding movement skills, he shines in pass protection and equally is adept at grinding in the ground game. Although scouts question his aggressiveness and toughness, Martin's raw talent will win out.

4. David DeCastro*, Stanford, OG (6-4, 304): DeCastro is the complete package as an interior blocker. He is smart, tough and physical and possesses the athleticism to assimilate into any offensive system. When scouts closely examine the success of Stanford's running game, they will fall in love with DeCastro's superb play at the point of attack.

5. Mike Adams, Ohio State, OT (6-6, 320): Adams missed five games due to an NCAA suspension for his role in the Ohio State memorabilia scandal, but he has displayed the athleticism and skill to be a quality NFL left tackle. His combination of size, strength and athletic ability makes him an intriguing talent worthy of discussion as a potential high pick.

6. Cordy Glenn, Georgia, G (6-5, 348): Glenn is a mountain of man with extraordinary movement skills for his size. He ideally is suited to anchor the interior of the line at a guard spot, but has displayed versatility by playing left tackle for the Bulldogs. With big, physical blockers valued at a premium, Glenn is certain to attract significant attention in the pre-draft process.

7. Zebrie Sanders, Florida State, OT (6-5, 307): Sanders has displayed the kind of versatility that scouts covet this season by transitioning from right to left tackle following a season-ending injury to Andrew Datko. As a big, physical edge player with strength and power, Sanders is an ideal right tackle prospect with the potential to pay immediate dividends.

8. Levy Adcock, Oklahoma State, OT (6-5, 322): As an underrated athlete with sound footwork and fundamentals, Adcock is an intriguing prospect ideally suited to play on the right side as a pro. He has extensive experience in pass protection in the Cowboys' spread system but also shows up well in the running game. Although his game ranks a notch below some of his counterparts, Adcock certainly will experience a run up the charts due to high value at the position.

9. Kelechi Osemele, Iowa State, OG (6-5, 347): A massive blocker with explosive strength and power. He has spent most of his collegiate career playing out of position at tackle, but his ability to maul defenders at the point of attack makes him an ideal fit at guard. While his inconsistent motor rates as a concern, his ability to win within tight quarters makes him a highly regarded guard prospect.

10. Ricky Wagner*, Wisconsin, OT (6'6, 320): Wagner has all of the tools to blossom into an all-star caliber player as a pro. His combination of size and strength shines in the run game, but he equally is adept at stifling rushers in pass protection. With sound technique to match his superior physical tools, he could be an intriguing prospect if he declares for the draft.

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Top 10 Defensive Linemen ( http://www.nfl.com/news/story/09000d5d824cc87e/article/top-10-dlinemen-versatility-will-boost-coples-ingram )

(*Denotes underclassmen)

1. Quinton Coples, North Carolina, DE (6-6, 285): From a production standpoint, Coples' final season was a disappointment, but his combination of size, athleticism and rush skill stands out on tape. Although he might be a better pro as a five-technique, his ability to be effective as a run or pass defender cements his status as the top defensive end in college football.

2. Melvin Ingram*, South Carolina, DE (6-2, 276): Ingram is the most athletic and versatile defender on this list. He is a former high school running back with exceptional quickness and rush skills. He can play multiple spots along the front, which makes him an ideal fit in a 3-4 scheme.

3. Andre Branch, Clemson, DE (6-4, 260): Branch has shot to the top of the charts after emerging as one of the most dominant pass rushers in college football. His impressive combination of speed and quickness makes him nearly impossible to block in isolated matchups in space. Productive pass rushers are always valued at a premium, which justifies Branch's surge up draft boards across the league.

4. Devon Still, Penn State, DT (6-4, 310): As a rugged interior defender with size and strength, Still has the tools to be an anchor in the middle of the line. Although he is a little upright in his play, his natural strength and power makes him difficult to move off his spot. Given the importance of having a big, physical "three-technique" in the middle of a four-man front, Still is a highly regarded prospect.

5. Fletcher Cox*, Mississippi State, DT (6-4, 295): Cox has unique athleticism and movement skills for an interior defender. His explosive, first-step quickness and closing burst could make him a disruptive force in a movement-based scheme, but questions about his ability to hold the point could limit him in the eyes of scouts.

6. Jerel Worthy*, Michigan State, DT (6-3, 310): As an active defensive tackle with explosive quickness and burst, Worthy is a problematic defender for opponents. He creates havoc with quick arm-overs or spin moves at the line of scrimmage and has a penchant for making tackles behind the line of scrimmage. His inconsistent motor is troublesome, but Worthy is a flash player with tremendous upside.

7. Mercilus Whitney*, Illinois, DE (6-4, 265): Whitney will garner the one-year wonder tag after surging from a single sack in 2010 to 14.5 sacks in 2011, but his raw talent and athleticism is hard to ignore. Scouts will have to decide if that production is sustainable.

8. Brandon Thompson, Clemson, DT (6-2, 310): Thompson is a classic run-stopper with the power and strength to control the point. He doesn't offer much as a pass rusher, but his ability to dominate on first and second downs makes him an ideal fit for teams searching for an immovable force in the middle.

9. Dontari Poe, Memphis, DT (6-3, 330): Poe is one of the strongest players in college football. He is immovable off the point and his ability to occupy multiple blockers without losing ground makes him an ideal "two-gap" player. With the proliferation of the 3-4 drastically increasing the value of nose tackles, Poe is certain to rise up charts around the league.

T-10. Cam Johnson, Virginia, DE (6-3, 270): Johnson is arguably the hardest-working edge player in college football. He wears down blockers with his fanatical effort and is also a skilled rusher capable of winning with speed or power. His ability to wreak havoc off the edges makes him an ideal right defensive end and he will certainly warrant serious consideration as an all-star-caliber playmaker by evaluators.

T-10. Billy Winn, Boise State, DE (6-3, 300): The talented defensive end is certainly a difference-maker, but his inconsistent effort forces scouts to question his passion and commitment. However, when he is focused and energized, Winn has the ability to take over games from his defensive end spot and scouts are willing to bet on those spectacular flashes.

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Top 10 Runningbacks ( http://www.nfl.com/news/story/09000d5d824d3dd9/article/top-10-rbs-alabamas-richardson-is-the-total-package )

(*Denotes underclassmen)

1. Trent Richardson*, Alabama, RB (5-11, 224): Talented runner with a pro-ready game, Richardson excels at grinding out tough yardage between the tackles, while also providing explosive plays on perimeter runs. Richardson is also regarded as an exceptional receiver, which makes him an ideal feature back. With several evaluators viewing Richardson as a better prospect than his predecessor (Mark Ingram), he is the undisputed choice as the top runner in college football.

2. David Wilson*, Virginia Tech, RB (5-10, 205): Wilson is an explosive playmaker built in the mold of

Ray Rice. He possesses the speed and quickness to scare defenders in space, but is also rugged enough to effectively run in tight quarters. Although his size leads to questions about his ability to carry the load, the fact that he finished 2011 with nine games with 20-plus carries suggests he is more than capable of being a workhorse.

3. Lamar Miller*, Miami (Fla.), RB (5-11, 212): Miller is a smooth runner with deceptive speed and quickness. He displays exceptional vision and awareness finding creases on the backside, and his surprising toughness on inside runs draws comparisons to former Hurricane Clinton Portis. While his dramatic drop in production during the final half of the season (only two 100-yard rushing games over final seven weeks) leads to questions about his ability to handle a heavy workload, his superior talent will make him hard to bypass as a potential franchise back.

4. LaMichael James*, Oregon, RB (5-9, 195): James is the dynamic playmaker that most offensive coordinators covet as a change-of-pace back in the backfield. He possesses a combination of speed, quickness and agility that makes him a threat to score from anywhere on the field. He shines as a runner/receiver in the Ducks' spread system. While there are certainly questions about whether James' remarkable production is a byproduct of playing in a wide-open scheme, he has potential to thrive as a

Darren Sproles-like weapon for a creative playcaller.

5. Chris Polk*, Washington, RB (5-11, 222): As a hard-nosed runner with a crafty running style, Polk is one of college football's best runners between the tackles. He bounces through traffic and consistently finds a way to get to the second level. While he lacks elite speed, his combination of footwork and power allows him to thrive within the 15-yard box, which is key to being a productive pro runner.

6. Bernard Pierce*, Temple, RB (6-0, 218): After spearheading the Owls' resurgence with his hard-nosed running style and robust production, Pierce is unquestionably one of the top workhorses in college football. He is at his best grinding between the tackles on a series of power runs, but also flashes the burst to get around the corner. Although the inferior level of competition he has faced might factor into the equation when assessing his ability, Pierce is a legitimate runner.

7. Isaiah Pead, Cincinnati, RB (5-10, 200): Pead is an explosive jitterbug with the speed and quickness to be an effective change of pace back as a pro. He attacks the line of scrimmage with a burst, but also possesses the balance and body control to run through tackles at the second level. His dangerous open-field running skills also make him an effective playmaker in the passing game. Pead routinely turns screens into big plays, and his versatility will make him a coveted prospect in several war rooms across the league.

8. Cyrus Gray, Texas A&M, RB (5-10, 212): Gray is a blue-collar runner with vision, quickness and cutback skills. His decisive, "one-cut" running style leads to few negative runs and is ideally suited to the zone-based scheme predominantly used in the pro game. He might lack the big-play potential of others on this list, but his combination of athleticism and toughness makes him an enticing prospect for teams looking for an undervalued player.

9. Montee Ball, Wisconsin, RB (5-11, 212): Ball is the most productive runner in college football with 32 rushing touchdowns in 275 carries. His penchant for finding the paint is admirable, but scouts are more concerned with his ability to elude and avoid defenders in traffic. He doesn't appear to possess elite speed or quickness, and the Badgers' talented offensive line routinely springs him to the second level unimpeded. Ball is certainly talented, but he lacks some of the blue-chip traits of his counterparts.

10. Doug Martin, Boise State, RB (5-9, 210): Martin isn't as flashy as some runners on this list, but his game is built for the pros. He is a rugged inside runner with underrated power, and he has a knack for falling forward at the end of runs. His ability to finish is one of his biggest traits, and coaches will appreciate his steady game as a finisher in a four-minute situation. Martin isn't a workhorse runner to build an offense around, but he is a solid complementary player as part of a rotation.

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Top 10 LBs ( http://www.nfl.com/news/story/09000d5d824d4504/article/top-10-lbs-physicality-agility-common-among-nations-best )

(*Denotes underclassmen)

1. Luke Kuechly*, Boston College, ILB (6-2, 237): Kuechly is not as athletic as some of the others on the list, but it is hard to find a more productive player at the position. His combination of instincts, awareness and anticipation is unrivaled in the college game, and his impressive tackling production is the result of his superb play diagnosis. Though his athleticism and coverage rate as concerns, his ability to thrive as a "two-down" linebacker is too much to ignore.

2. Manti Te'o*, Notre Dame, ILB (6-2, 255): As one of the more athletic inside linebackers on the list, Te'o excels at chasing down runners from sideline to sideline. His anticipation and awareness is exceptional, and his production is the result of his keen diagnostic ability. While he doesn't take on blockers well, he has a knack for slipping free and getting in on tackles near the line of scrimmage. With few linebackers possessing his combination of athleticism and instincts, Te'o will be a highly coveted prospect.

3. Dont'a Hightower*, Alabama, ILB (6-4, 260): As a massive inside linebacker with exceptional instincts and awareness, Hightower wreaks havoc on between-tackle runs. His overwhelming size and power stops runners in their tracks, and they eventually shy away from his punishing hits. Although Hightower is limited in passing situations, his awareness and recognition allows him to stay around the ball and he isn't the liability most would suspect given his size.

4. Vontaze Burfict*, Arizona State, ILB (6-3, 250): As one of the most violent hitters in college football in recent years, Burfict is an intimidating force between the hashes. He punishes ball carriers and displays sideline-to-sideline chase skills from his "Mike" linebacker spot. He possesses exceptional instincts, but is an undisciplined player who is prone to freelance based on his hunches. In addition, he routinely fails to keep his emotions in check, which results in numerous personal foul penalties at inopportune times. Given those red flags, scouts will have to dig deep to assess his on-field character.

5. Courtney Upshaw, Alabama, OLB (6-2, 265): Upshaw's game lacks the sizzle of some pass rushers on this list, but his steady production makes him an ideal 3-4 OLB. He is tough and physical at the point against the run, but also flashes disruptive skills as a pass rusher. He excels at bending and bursting around the corner, and shows a knack for getting the ball out when he gets to the quarterback. With more and more teams employing variations of the 3-4, Upshaw's value is certainly high on draft boards across the league.

6. Zach Brown, North Carolina, OLB (6-2, 248): Brown might be the fastest linebacker in the draft, and his explosiveness makes him a desirable playmaker off the edge. He can rush or drop effectively from an upright or three-point position, which allows him to play a variety positions in a 3-4 or 4-3 scheme. Scouts have questioned Brown's toughness, but his extraordinary speed and athleticism are too enticing to ignore.

7. Jarvis Jones*, Georgia, OLB (6-2, 242): Jones emerged as the one of the best pass rushers in the country in his first season at Georgia. His first-step quickness is remarkable and he complements it with a relentless motor that allows him to record sacks strictly off extra effort. His 13.5 sacks rank second in the nation and scouts are certainly intrigued by his exceptional pass rush prowess. Jones needs to improve his skills as a run defender.

8. Kevin Reddick*, North Carolina, OLB (6-2, 240): As a rugged linebacker with sound instincts, awareness and anticipation, Reddick is a tackling machine. His aggressiveness and physical demeanor makes him an impressive run defender, but he also is solid against the pass. He is comfortable rushing or dropping into coverage and has the ability to play as a sub-defender in nickel situations. Coaches are desperately searching for linebackers capable of staying on the field in every situation, and Reddick fits the mold.

9. Lavonte David, Nebraska, OLB (6-1, 225): David is best described as a football player who overcomes his size limitations with superb instincts and fanatical effort. He has a knack for making the big play at the right moment, and coaches will love his nose for the ball. David is ideally suited to play "Will" linebacker in a Tampa-2 scheme, but his production and playmaking ability makes him an intriguing prospect regardless of system.

10. Brandon Lindsey, Pittsburgh, OLB (6-2, 245): Lindsey is listed as an outside linebacker, but spends most of his time with his hand in the dirt like a defensive end. He flashes rush skills off the edge, but wins off toughness and guile rather than explosive speed or quickness. His persistence routinely produces impact plays, which will certainly enhance his value on draft day.

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Top 10 DBs ( http://www.nfl.com/news/story/09000d5d824db531/article/top-10-dbs-lsu-corner-claiborne-leads-talented-sec-trio- )

(*Denotes underclassmen; only players three years removed from high school considered)

1. Morris Claiborne*, LSU, CB (6-0, 185): Claiborne is the most complete cover corner in college football. He displays a versatile game that suits any defensive scheme, and his ability to routinely snuff out the opponent's top receiver makes him a potential shutdown corner.

2. Dre Kirkpatrick*, Alabama, CB (6-2, 192): It is hard to find tall corners with exceptional movement skills and instincts, but Kirkpatrick appears to be the complete package. He is polished in zone and man coverage and is one of the best tacklers I've seen at the position in years.

3. Jonathan Banks*, Mississippi State, CB (6-1, 185): Banks doesn't receive the national fanfare of his SEC brethren, but his game is certainly on par with his counterparts. He is silky smooth in coverage, displays exceptional ball awareness and is a legitimate playmaker in the clutch. Factor in his underrated blitz skills, and there is a lot to like about Banks' game.

4. Janoris Jenkins, North Alabama, CB (5-9, 182): Jenkins would possibly rank higher on the list, if not for his questionable decisions that led to his dismissal from Florida. He is an aggressive ball hawk with outstanding instincts and awareness. He is a capable of blanketing receivers in man or zone, and he shows an

Asante Samuel-like knack for getting his hands on the ball. With coaches and scouts enamored with adding playmakers to their respective rosters, Jenkins will generate heavy discussion in war rooms across the league despite his character concerns.

5. Mark Barron, Alabama, S (6-1, 223): As football leans more towards the passing game offensively, the desire to find safeties with the instincts, athleticism and versatility to make plays in space is a must. Barron certainly possesses those traits, while also bringing the toughness needed to align as an eighth defender in the box against the run. Throw in the fact that he is arguably the best ball hawk in country, and there is no doubt Barron is the top safety in college football.

6. Chase Minnifield, Virginia, CB (6-0, 185): Minnifield's NFL bloodlines (father, Frank, earned Pro Bowl honors while playing for the Browns from 1984-92) certainly attracted the attention of scouts, but it has been his rock-solid game that has placed him prominently on this list. His penchant for getting his hands on the ball is due to his keen understanding of the nuances of the position. In addition, he plays with an aggressive demeanor that is reflected in his tenacious tackling on the perimeter. As coaches narrow the list of top corners on the board, Minnifield's consistent performance over his career will keep him near the top of the chart.

7. Alfonzo Dennard, Nebraska, CB (5-9, 205): If size didn't rank as a major consideration in the evaluation process, Dennard would have a chance to rank higher on this list based on his steady performance at Nebraska. He has a solid overall game without many glaring flaws and is one of the toughest competitors you'll find on the perimeter. He challenges receivers at every turn and makes even elite pass catchers earn their production. Although his diminutive stature will affect his positioning on some draft boards, the comparisons to

Antoine Winfield will keep him afloat as a top candidate for most teams.

8. Jayron Hosley*, Virginia Tech, CB (5-10, 172): From a performance and production standpoint, Hosely appeared to take a step back in 2011 due to a nagging hamstring injury. He didn't display the burst or acceleration that led to his nation-leading nine interceptions a season ago. However, he started to show glimpses of his stellar form near the end of the season and scouts love his ball skills and awareness. Throw in his dynamic return skills and penchant for playmaking, and there is still a buzz swirling around Hosley's game.

9. Trumaine Johnson, Montana, CB (6-2, 205): Teams looking for big, physical corners will place Johnson higher on the board than some of the more recognizable names on this list. He possesses a combination of size, speed and athleticism that is hard to find, and evaluators love his dominance of small-school competition. How he fares when matched up with an elite player at the next level is a concern, but his immense talent and potential warrants his inclusion on this list.

10. Markelle Martin, Oklahoma State, S, (6-0, 198): Martin is far from a polished product, but scouts love his prototypical size and athleticism. He is fluid mover with the instincts and awareness to develop into a playmaker as a pro. Although his game is still marred by inconsistencies in coverage and tackling, his upside and potential could be too enticing for teams to bypass in the early stages of the draft.

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Top 10 WRs / TEs ( http://www.nfl.com/news/story/09000d5d824dcc62/article/top-10-wrtes-osus-blackmon-headlines-explosive-group )

(*Denotes underclassmen; only players three years removed from high school considered)

1. Justin Blackmon*, Oklahoma State WR (6-1, 215): The most explosive receiver in college football has a game that is eerily similar to Terrell Owens'. His combination of size, strength and athleticism overwhelms defenders, and his penchant for playmaking makes him a potential anchor for a sophisticated passing game. Throw in the fact that Oklahoma State's coaches frequently have suggested Blackmon's skills are more advanced than

Dez Bryant's at a similar stage, it's easy to place Blackmon at the top of the list.

2. Michael Floyd, Notre Dame, WR (6-3, 224): Floyd might rank as the best pass catcher in college football since

Larry Fitzgerald. He displays unbelievable ball skills and has a knack for making the acrobatic catch look routine. Although there are questions about his top-end speed, he rarely is tracked from behind in the open field and plays with reckless abandon with the ball in his hands. If he is able to properly address his character issues, Floyd might make the race for the No. 1 spot closer than anyone anticipates.

3. Kendall Wright, Baylor, WR (5-10, 190): Wright has scouts drooling over his extraordinary combination of speed, athleticism and burst. He routinely blows past defenders on vertical routes but also flashes the ability to wreak havoc on "catch-and-run" plays on the outside. While he still remains unpolished as a route runner, the potential for Wright to make a Mike Wallace-like impact on the NFL has sent his stock soaring in war rooms across the league.

4. Alshon Jeffrey*, South Carolina, WR (6-4, 229): Jeffrey is a jump ball specialist with the size and athleticism that scouts covet in a No. 1 receiver. He excels at coming down with contested balls in traffic and is an indefensible target in the red area. Although he remains unrefined as a route runner and lacks top end speed, Jeffrey's size, strength and movement skills could prompt a team to envision him blossoming into a

Plaxico Burress-type playmaker in the passing game.

5. Dwayne Allen*, Clemson, TE (6-4, 255): Scouts looking for the next tight end capable of creating mismatches should closely examine Allen's game. He displays the speed and athleticism to run away from linebackers, while possessing the size and strength to overpower defenders in tight quarters. The combination of skills makes him impossible to guard in passing situations, a quality that makes him a coveted prospect in many war rooms across the league. He could be the next hybrid tight end to take the league by storm.

6. Orson Charles*, Georgia, TE (6-3, 242): Charles has all of the physical tools to become a matchup nightmare as a pro. He runs like a receiver but has the size and strength to maul small defenders in isolated matchups. He is capable of stretching the field down the middle, while also acting as the primary target between the hashes. Although he must continue to develop as a blocker, his ability to impact the passing game as a vertical threat makes him a hot commodity in draft rooms.

7. Nick Toon, Wisconsin, WR (6-2, 220): Toon has been a bit of a disappointment this season, but his combination of size, strength and ball skills entices scouts. He flashes the ability to make plays between the hashes, while also acting as a sneaky deep threat in the Badgers' passing game. Toon has struggled gaining separation from defenders in tight coverage, but he could improve in that area with more reps and experience. With more teams looking for big, physical receivers to anchor their passing games, Toon's value remains high throughout the league.

8. Coby Fleener, Stanford, TE (6-6, 245): It's hard to find a tight end prospect with experience playing from a traditional alignment, but Fleener has been well groomed from his time at Stanford. He thrived in the Pac-12 running pro-style routes over the middle of the field, but he also acted as the Cardinal's lone deep threat the past two seasons. He led FBS with 10 touchdown receptions and posted an impressive 20.3 yards per catch average that is uncommon for the position. In addition, he displayed a gritty disposition as a blocker that makes it easy to envision him blossoming into an every down player as a pro. With few tight ends rivaling his overall game, it is quite possible that Fleener emerges as the top tight end on this list by draft day.

9. Dwight Jones, North Carolina, WR (6-4, 225): From a production standpoint, it is hard to dispute Jones' inclusion on this list after scoring 11 touchdowns and surpassing the 1,000-yard mark in 2011. He has the combination of size, speed and athleticism to emerge as a No. 1 receiver as a pro, and scouts are excited about his dramatic improvement as a senior. If he can continue to dazzle during the college all-star game circuit, Jones might climb higher on charts around the league.

10. Tommy Streeter*, Miami, WR, (6-5, 215): Streeter might be a surprising inclusion on this list, but a close look at his game reveals a big, athletic playmaker with speed to burn. He excels at blowing past defenders on vertical routes and is also a crafty route over the middle. His size and athleticism makes an ideal target as a potential No. 1 receiver. He needs to display better consistency with his hands.

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I would love to see Michael Floyd, Ashlon Jeffery or Blackmon for the Colts, but I think there is a 99% chance they obviously won't. It would be more critical even if they can't resign Reggie. Rams will probably pick one of those bad boys, they need some receivers. I still expect the Colts to take either Luck or RG3 or Barkely pending on if the latter two come out to prepare for the future without Manning.

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I would love to see Michael Floyd, Ashlon Jeffery or Blackmon for the Colts, but I think there is a 99% chance they obviously won't. It would be more critical even if they can't resign Reggie. Rams will probably pick one of those bad boys, they need some receivers. I still expect the Colts to take either Luck or RG3 or Barkely pending on if the latter two come out to prepare for the future without Manning.

I personally dont want Alshon Jeffery to do anything with the colts. He has poor work ethic and is overweight and out of shape. Read about him yourself
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I would LOVE to see Tommy Streeter in a Colts uniform too, I've watched all his games as a Hurricanes and he has a rare blend of size, athleticism and speed. Kind of reminds me of the days of Andre Johnson at the U. Just the fact that he made JaCory Harris look good should make him a top WR in the draft. I was very disappointed to hear that he wasn't going to stay for his senior year because I thought if he had another productive season and more experience he would be a 15-20 pick in the 1st round. If he's there in the 3rd pick him or even trade up into the late 2nd round if he's still there.

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Among just the players on the list:

CB

Morris Claiborne, LSU

Dre Kirkpatrick, Alabama

Jonathan Banks, Mississippi State

Chase Minnifield, Virginia

LB

Manti Te'o, Notre Dame

Dont'a Hightower, Alabama

DT

Dontari Poe, Memphis

DE

Quinton Coples, North Carolina

Andre Branch, Clemson

WR

Justin Blackmon, Oklahoma State

Michael Floyd, Notre Dame

Kendall Wright, Baylor

TE

Coby Fleener, Stanford

OG

David DeCastro, Stanford

Cordy Glenn, Georgia

I could see ALL of these players providing us more impact playing time than Andrew Luck over the next 4 years.

Those are the players we need to win a Super Bowl in the near future. It doesn't matter what happens after Peyton, because we still have Peyton. We can't be prepared for life after Peyton while also adding players like these (above) to help us immediately.

We must trade the 1st pick and find a way to get a couple of these players.

Could you imagine getting Claiborne and DeCastro in the 1st, Poe and Wright in the 2nd?

Or maybe Blackmon, and either Te'o or Hightower?

Minnifield and Glenn?

That would be amazing, and it would actually help us out in areas we NEED right now.

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Among just the players on the list:

CB

Morris Claiborne, LSU

Dre Kirkpatrick, Alabama

Jonathan Banks, Mississippi State

Chase Minnifield, Virginia

LB

Manti Te'o, Notre Dame

Dont'a Hightower, Alabama

DT

Dontari Poe, Memphis

DE

Quinton Coples, North Carolina

Andre Branch, Clemson

WR

Justin Blackmon, Oklahoma State

Michael Floyd, Notre Dame

Kendall Wright, Baylor

TE

Coby Fleener, Stanford

OG

David DeCastro, Stanford

Cordy Glenn, Georgia

I could see ALL of these players providing us more impact playing time than Andrew Luck over the next 4 years.

Those are the players we need to win a Super Bowl in the near future. It doesn't matter what happens after Peyton, because we still have Peyton. We can't be prepared for life after Peyton while also adding players like these (above) to help us immediately.

We must trade the 1st pick and find a way to get a couple of these players.

Could you imagine getting Claiborne and DeCastro in the 1st, Poe and Wright in the 2nd?

Or maybe Blackmon, and either Te'o or Hightower?

Minnifield and Glenn?

That would be amazing, and it would actually help us out in areas we NEED right now.

These players would help us after Peyton Manning retires, so I don't get the argument that we will be bad after Peyton if we don't draft Andrew Luck. I would love to get Morris Claiborne and Brandon Thompson in the first, then Cordy Glenn or Kelechi Osemele and Mark Barron in the 2nd.

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I could see ALL of these players providing us more impact playing time than Andrew Luck over the next 4 years.

Those are the players we need to win a Super Bowl in the near future. It doesn't matter what happens after Peyton, because we still have Peyton. We can't be prepared for life after Peyton while also adding players like these (above) to help us immediately.

Reality Check. We aren't going to have a chance with Peyton for his last 3 years for the Superbowl. Our team could use any of those players but only if they are available in the 2nd round. This Colts team is currently a rebuilding project, and Luck should be the #1 priority.

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Reality Check. We aren't going to have a chance with Peyton for his last 3 years for the Superbowl. Our team could use any of those players but only if they are available in the 2nd round. This Colts team is currently a rebuilding project, and Luck should be the #1 priority.

Why aren't we going to have a chance with Peyton? We only went to the Super Bowl with a worse team just two years ago. Peyton gives us that chance, and we've added talent on both lines. The surgery won't set him back; it's like a break: 99% of the time, if the fusion takes - which it did - the player sees an increase in strength, up to 115%. Manning will now be playing without pain.

We aren't in rebuilding mode... we are in "we didn't have Peyton for a season" mode. Luck isn't the #1 priority, the safest option, or even the most logical option. As it turns out, some analysts no longer believe he's the best QB in this draft, let alone "since Elway." He appears to have peaked already. That's a bad sign heading into the NFL. Players like Barkley, RGIII, and Jones seem to offer more upside. We are looking for a developmental project, after all, as Peyton will play out his contract.

Reality check yourself. You have no idea what you are talking about, but I welcome verification of that fact with another of your pitiful retorts.

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One cautionary note on the thought that Luck may have already peaked ...

I very specifically remember the same thing being said about Manning, during the Manning vs Leaf debate. The thought was very much out there that with Manning you get what you get, that he is at his peak and there is no further upside. Conversely, that Leaf is a specimen with so much more remaining upside.

Ergo, though I am not sold on Luck being the best choice for the Colts (if a king's ransom can be had for the 1st pick, I say trade it), I do not buy the thought that Luck has hit his peak. I think that kind of talk is silly. I see no reason to think that he cannot continue to excel and grow as a professional quarterback. Just say'in.

As for Manti Te'o, I thought I heard he had stated that he's returning to college next year, surprising all of the pundits with that intention.

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Why aren't we going to have a chance with Peyton? We only went to the Super Bowl with a worse team just two years ago. Peyton gives us that chance, and we've added talent on both lines. The surgery won't set him back; it's like a break: 99% of the time, if the fusion takes - which it did - the player sees an increase in strength, up to 115%. Manning will now be playing without pain.

We aren't in rebuilding mode... we are in "we didn't have Peyton for a season" mode. Luck isn't the #1 priority, the safest option, or even the most logical option. As it turns out, some analysts no longer believe he's the best QB in this draft, let alone "since Elway." He appears to have peaked already. That's a bad sign heading into the NFL. Players like Barkley, RGIII, and Jones seem to offer more upside. We are looking for a developmental project, after all, as Peyton will play out his contract.

Reality check yourself. You have no idea what you are talking about, but I welcome verification of that fact with another of your pitiful retorts.

Doogan whatever happened to EvilleColt. When you guys would go back and forth it was fun to read but now it's just one sided.

I do believe Peyton will be back next season and if we draft Luck I think it's purely because the media hyped our FO(Polian) up on doing so.

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Why aren't we going to have a chance with Peyton? We only went to the Super Bowl with a worse team just two years ago. Peyton gives us that chance, and we've added talent on both lines. The surgery won't set him back; it's like a break: 99% of the time, if the fusion takes - which it did - the player sees an increase in strength, up to 115%. Manning will now be playing without pain. We aren't in rebuilding mode... we are in "we didn't have Peyton for a season" mode. Luck isn't the #1 priority, the safest option, or even the most logical option. As it turns out, some analysts no longer believe he's the best QB in this draft, let alone "since Elway." He appears to have peaked already. That's a bad sign heading into the NFL. Players like Barkley, RGIII, and Jones seem to offer more upside. We are looking for a developmental project, after all, as Peyton will play out his contract. Reality check yourself. You have no idea what you are talking about, but I welcome verification of that fact with another of your pitiful retorts.

You know.. I'm honestly going to feel for you when the reality sets in Manning signs with another team or retires. I've already gotten past the stage of denial. Its a fact, this dude is done. Everyone is talking about it in the media now and yet I've been saying it over and over for the last 5 months. Its a rare opportunity to have the #1 pick, let alone be gifted the best QB in years... Irsay is no fool, he knows its a no-brainer, but is just trying to play safe publicity to not tick off the current fan base.

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I LOVE LaMichael James. He is a dynamic playmaker with great explosiveness and versatility. He reminds me so much of the Jag's MJD; he can catch the ball out of the backfield, and he can run through the tackles just as easily as he can run outside them. I kno we have more glaring needs on the other side of the ball, but if this guy falls in our lap in the 3rd round he would hard to pass on.

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I'm surprised Ryan Broyles didn't make this list. I know injuries hurt his stock, but I thought he was the most NFL ready receiver out of the entire draft. He is deceptively quick in and out of his breaks, he has strong hands, he can go over the middle and run those tough intermediate routes and he is great after the catch.

I know he tore his ACL this past season so a lot of teams aren't going to want to take the risk with him, but I know he would have been a late 1st rouind/ early 2nd round pick otherwise.

Kendal Wright out of Baylor is IMO the best deep threat in all college football, and was a integral part of RG3's heismen campaign this season. He can bring that Desean Jackson-type homerun ability and make an immediate impact on any team.

Mark Barron is the guy to get in this draft, but don't sleep on Robert Lester Jr. He is great in coverage, and one of the best tacklers I've seen at FS.

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You know.. I'm honestly going to feel for you when the reality sets in Manning signs with another team or retires. I've already gotten past the stage of denial. Its a fact, this dude is done. Everyone is talking about it in the media now and yet I've been saying it over and over for the last 5 months. Its a rare opportunity to have the #1 pick, let alone be gifted the best QB in years... Irsay is no fool, he knows its a no-brainer, but is just trying to play safe publicity to not tick off the current fan base.

So when Manning starts for the Colts next year, then what? I promise you, that's what will happen.

As for me, I won't be broken up if he retires, because he will know it's time. It's just football. It's just entertainment. I dont attach emotions to it, carry the burden of victory and defeat, or hold a grudge.

It is likely we take Luck, as it's the safe move by the standards of the uninformed. Why not take him instead of having to think about the picks, right? If we do take him, I hope he succeeds, because it's good for the Colts. But he won't be playing next year during anything but garbage time, or the year after, or the year after....

The fantasy you've fashioned for yourself doesn't line up with existing information from the Colts organization, or medical fact. So enjoy your hollow little mind and Luck pajamas while you wait five years for him to make an impact on our team.

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Man I am so tired of Luck. I don't want him on our team. Either trade the first pick and have a bevy of picks later, or use it on somebody that can contribute to the Super Bowl runs we'll be making in Big P's last 4 years. I'd much rather get a middle round QB with strong work ethic, who doesn't mind sitting the bench and learning from the best.

I really wouldn't mind us letting Mathis walk and bringing in that Coples guy. He sounds like a Julius Peppers kind of DE, and I would love to have Julius Peppers on our team. A guy that can rush the passer and play the run......imagine that. After that you gotta get a shutdown CB, a replacement for Wayne, and another guard since Saturday and Diem are probably gone. Address those issues, and I don't see any team being able to stop us.

QB - P. Money

HB - Addai, Brown, Carter (The Three Headed Monster)

FB - Felton

WR - Wayne, Garcon, Collie, AJ Jenkins (Illinois)

TE - Clark, Tamme, Eldridge

LT - Castonzo

LG - Reitz

C - Pollak

RG - Carl Nicks (I can dream right? Saints already have a lot tied up in Evans and they have to resign Brees)

RT - Ijalana

DE - Freeney, Quinton Coples, Anderson, Brayton, Hughes

DT - Nevis, Moala, Mookie, Derek Wolfe (Cincinnati)

OLB - Sims, Conner, Wheeler

MLB - Angerer

CB - Powers, Chase Minnifield (Virginia), Thomas, Lacey, Rucker

FS - Bethea

SS - Bullitt

Also we have a new defensive scheme in place, one that actually challenges the receivers a little bit. And a new Special Teams coach and Strength and Conditioning coach.

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  • 3 weeks later...

So when Manning starts for the Colts next year, then what? I promise you, that's what will happen.

As for me, I won't be broken up if he retires, because he will know it's time. It's just football. It's just entertainment. I dont attach emotions to it, carry the burden of victory and defeat, or hold a grudge.

It is likely we take Luck, as it's the safe move by the standards of the uninformed. Why not take him instead of having to think about the picks, right? If we do take him, I hope he succeeds, because it's good for the Colts. But he won't be playing next year during anything but garbage time, or the year after, or the year after....

The fantasy you've fashioned for yourself doesn't line up with existing information from the Colts organization, or medical fact. So enjoy your hollow little mind and Luck pajamas while you wait five years for him to make an impact on our team.

First off Dookie, the "standards of the uninformed" sounds like something that is better applied for those who have no faith in rebuilding the future with Luck. Peyton has 2 years max left in him.. his injury makes it so he'd be smart to walk away today.

I would have to say "hollow minds" exist in ignoring a career ending neck injury for a once-great QB, and leaving us once again vulnerable to a 2-14 season... instead of repeating history, i'd suggest moving on from it. That doesn't sound like a statement from a hollow mind now does it? And it won't take 5 seasons to allow Luck to catch on. The kid will at least get us at 8-8 in his first season. From there, the sky's the limit.

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So when Manning starts for the Colts next year, then what? I promise you, that's what will happen.

As for me, I won't be broken up if he retires, because he will know it's time. It's just football. It's just entertainment. I dont attach emotions to it, carry the burden of victory and defeat, or hold a grudge.

It is likely we take Luck, as it's the safe move by the standards of the uninformed. Why not take him instead of having to think about the picks, right? If we do take him, I hope he succeeds, because it's good for the Colts. But he won't be playing next year during anything but garbage time, or the year after, or the year after....

The fantasy you've fashioned for yourself doesn't line up with existing information from the Colts organization, or medical fact. So enjoy your hollow little mind and Luck pajamas while you wait five years for him to make an impact on our team.

You honestly think that if the colts draft luck he will ride the bench for 5 years?? IF the colts take luck he will be the starter by the 2014 season at the latest. Colts aren't going to draft a qb first overall to ride the bench for 5 years. Think about it before making childish comments about hollowed minds and luck pajamas. Who says that seriously?

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You know.. I'm honestly going to feel for you when the reality sets in Manning signs with another team or retires. I've already gotten past the stage of denial. Its a fact, this dude is done. Everyone is talking about it in the media now and yet I've been saying it over and over for the last 5 months. Its a rare opportunity to have the #1 pick, let alone be gifted the best QB in years... Irsay is no fool, he knows its a no-brainer, but is just trying to play safe publicity to not tick off the current fan base.

I don't know if this statment is true. Most of the time he seems like a very good NFL owner, but with the firing of Bill Polian, my confidence in him is shaken. During the season he was saying the Polian knows what he's doing and is a hall of famer. Now he fires him with no suitable replacement? It seems that he has listened to Bob Kravitz too much lately or something. NFL owners do not and probably should not run their teams. Look at the Steelers, Packers, and Ravens. I don't even know or remember who their owners are and the Packers don't even have an owner, they are a public company. I trust Bill Polian far more than I do Jim Irsay when it comes to running a succesful football team.

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First off Dookie, the "standards of the uninformed" sounds like something that is better applied for those who have no faith in rebuilding the future with Luck. Peyton has 2 years max left in him.. his injury makes it so he'd be smart to walk away today.

I would have to say "hollow minds" exist in ignoring a career ending neck injury for a once-great QB, and leaving us once again vulnerable to a 2-14 season... instead of repeating history, i'd suggest moving on from it. That doesn't sound like a statement from a hollow mind now does it? And it won't take 5 seasons to allow Luck to catch on. The kid will at least get us at 8-8 in his first season. From there, the sky's the limit.

The bolded part is your opinion.

And when he means five seasons till Andrew Luck would make an impact, he mean that Peyton Manning has 4 years left on his contract and Luck would have to sit behind him.

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4. David DeCastro*, Stanford, OG (6-4, 304): DeCastro is the complete package as an interior blocker. He is smart, tough and physical and possesses the athleticism to assimilate into any offensive system. When scouts closely examine the success of Stanford's running game, they will fall in love with DeCastro's superb play at the point of attack.

What round is this guy thought to go in? We need another lineman in the best case situation this off-season. We could do worse than bringing in a guy who played for Stanford and was on the same team as Luck if we go with LUck as the top pick.

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