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Are our quarterbacks smart or what?


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While killing time until tomorrow's game I stumbled upon some interesting stats while surfing the web...If wonderlic scores mean anything it looks like the Colts have some pretty smart quarterbacks.....Luck 37, Harnish, 34 Hasselbeck 29. Compare that if you will to quarterback greats, John Elway 29,Peyton Manning 28, RG3 24, Brett Farve 22, Cam Newton 21, Terry Bradshaw 16, Dan Marino 15, Jim Kelly 15, Donavan MaNabb 15, and Vince Young 6. As you can see,I'm a little bored!

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I've never really felt the Wonderlic was all that helpful to determine who will be great players, but it is a good baseline to see who has the aptitude to comprehend the more intellectual aspect of the sport.

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I've never really felt the Wonderlic was all that helpful to determine who will be great players, but it is a good baseline to see who has the aptitude to comprehend the more intellectual aspect of the sport.

yea blaine gabber shows you that
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I've never really felt the Wonderlic was all that helpful to determine who will be great players, but it is a good baseline to see who has the aptitude to comprehend the more intellectual aspect of the sport.

Yeah didn't Fitzpatrick score like a perfect 50 or something?

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Yeah didn't Fitzpatrick score like a perfect 50 or something?

 

Yeah, whatever the perfect score is, he got it.  It's just another measurable, like speed, strength or how far you can sling it.  None of those mean you'll be a good or bad QB.  

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raw intelligence and wisdom don't necessarily go hand in hand

 

peyton manning is probably the wisest qb i have ever witnessed

In his hey day...hands down.

Tho I would equal Brady but in a much different way.

Both make FEW mistakes.

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Yeah, whatever the perfect score is, he got it.  It's just another measurable, like speed, strength or how far you can sling it.  None of those mean you'll be a good or bad QB.

Hey guys, Your trying to read too much into my post. I simply stated "we have smart quarterbacks!" No more and no less. Let's just smile and go on.
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I've never really felt the Wonderlic was all that helpful to determine who will be great players, but it is a good baseline to see who has the aptitude to comprehend the more intellectual aspect of the sport.

Exactly. In my profession there is no applicable college degree out there, however my employer requires a degree, in anything. He says a degree proves you are willing and capable of learning what he wants to teach you. And he has a point.
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Some players purposely miss questions to avoid getting a perfect score. Having a perfect score is a turn-off for some coaches, because they don't want players over-analyzing things. Read what Pat McInally had to say about his perfect wonderlic:

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2011/02/28/pat-mcinally-thinks-perfect-wonderlic-score-hurt-his-draft-stoc/

The Wonderlic isn't easy enough that you would have to miss questions on purpose lol.

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The Wonderlic doesn't translate to the NFL.  I think Rex Grossman had a higher Wonderlic, but we all know how that turned out.  It's just a little quiz to keep the mental aspect involved in Combine testing.  And I believe the NFL is looking at changing it or using a different test

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The Wonderlic isn't easy enough that you would have to miss questions on purpose lol.

The wonderlic is a measure of how quickly a player can think, as all 50 questions must be answered in 12 MINUTES! Given enough time we all could come up with the answers and score high. You have to be preform quickly and accurately to score high. Much more than an IQ test.
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Wonderlic is as useless as the SATs

The Wonderlic is actually a really good aptitude test. That's why it's been around so long. However, when it comes to football a high Wonderlic doesn't always translate to a great player.

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The wonderlic is a measure of how quickly a player can think, as all 50 questions must be answered in 12 MINUTES! Given enough time we all could come up with the answers and score high. You have to be preform quickly and accurately to score high. Much more than an IQ test.

If you gave test takers an unlimited time limit,they would score higher no doubt, but the time limit itself isn't what stops people from getting a perfect score. The questions on the later half of the test get increasingly difficult.

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If you gave test takers an unlimited time limit,they would score higher no doubt, but the time limit itself isn't what stops people from getting a perfect score. The questions on the later half of the test get increasingly difficult.

 

the wonderlic doesnt prove anything though

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the wonderlic doesnt prove anything though

Absolutely false.

The Wonderlic is mostly used in business, and in the hiring process. It is used to judge aptitude, and it does a very good job at that. In many work forces having a high Wonderlic score is an extremely good indicator of future job success. There's a reason it's been around since the 1930's, and still hasn't been phased out.

In the NFL however, intelligence/high aptitude is only a fraction of what it takes to be great. The Wonderlic in the NFL is used to see if players can grasp higher concepts, and depending on how you look at it, willingness to learn. It's not meant to predict with 100% accuracy football success or failure.

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Absolutely false.

The Wonderlic is mostly used in business, and in the hiring process. It is used to judge aptitude, and it does a very good job at that. In many work forces having a high Wonderlic score is an extremely good indicator of future job success. There's a reason it's been around since the 1930's, and still hasn't been phased out.

In the NFL however, intelligence/high aptitude is only a fraction of what it takes to be great. The Wonderlic in the NFL is used to see if players can grasp higher concepts, and depending on how you look at it, willingness to learn. It's not meant to predict with 100% accuracy football success or failure.

Standardized tests don't prove anything. I bombed my SATs and finished my college career with a 3.5 gpa as an accounting major

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Standardized tests don't prove anything. I bombed my SATs and finished my college career with a 3.5 gpa as an accounting major

Standardized tests absolutely prove things. Take everything I say with a grain of salt and my own opinion, but my background is in psychology and psychological testing. Part of which you learn about many many types of tests, like the SAT, ACT, and tests such as the Wonderlic.

Standardized tests aren't results cast in stone. They don't tell you where you are and always will be, just where you are when you take the test.

I didn't do overly well on my SATs either, but they aren't used to tell colleges how smart you can be, they're used to show colleges where you stand in relation to other perspective students. Then they use that information to decide who is accepted and denied. Now you can argue the merits of that system, but the SAT measures what it claims to measure quite well. As does the Wonderlic.

I can tell you I was not as intelligent as I am now, as I was when I took the SAT, so comparing my collegiate success to back then doesn't apply. Because I've learned since then. When I took the SAT I was a bit of a screw up, and had like a 2.5 GPA lol. So I'm sure my score accurately reflected how much I had actually learned in my time at highschool.

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While killing time until tomorrow's game I stumbled upon some interesting stats while surfing the web...If wonderlic scores mean anything it looks like the Colts have some pretty smart quarterbacks.....Luck 37, Harnish, 34 Hasselbeck 29. Compare that if you will to quarterback greats, John Elway 29,Peyton Manning 28, RG3 24, Brett Farve 22, Cam Newton 21, Terry Bradshaw 16, Dan Marino 15, Jim Kelly 15, Donavan MaNabb 15, and Vince Young 6. As you can see,I'm a little bored!

What was Mark Sanchez' score?

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Standardized tests absolutely prove things. Take everything I say with a grain of salt and my own opinion, but my background is in psychology and psychological testing. Part of which you learn about many many types of tests, like the SAT, ACT, and tests such as the Wonderlic.

Standardized tests aren't results cast in stone. They don't tell you where you are and always will be, just where you are when you take the test.

I didn't do overly well on my SATs either, but they aren't used to tell colleges how smart you can be, they're used to show colleges where you stand in relation to other perspective students. Then they use that information to decide who is accepted and denied. Now you can argue the merits of that system, but the SAT measures what it claims to measure quite well. As does the Wonderlic.

I can tell you I was not as intelligent as I am now, as I was when I took the SAT, so comparing my collegiate success to back then doesn't apply. Because I've learned since then. When I took the SAT I was a bit of a screw up, and had like a 2.5 GPA lol. So I'm sure my score accurately reflected how much I had actually learned in my time at highschool.

 

I was looking into graduate school a while ago in business and I had an admissions person tell me that the GMAT is the most reliable indicator of success in graduate school, more so then undergraduate GPA.

 

But you are right standardized tests can only tell you so much.

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I was looking into graduate school a while ago in business and I had an admissions person tell me that the GMAT is the most reliable indicator of success in graduate school, more so then undergraduate GPA.

But you are right standardized tests can only tell you so much.

Oh yeah, the tests they want from you for graduate school are definitely the next level, and also much more specific about what they feel you should know. Like the LSAT, GRE, MCAT, much more narrow testing than a test like the SAT which is testing very broad concepts.

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