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Book club thread - what are you reading

56 posts in this topic

51 minutes ago, Coffeedrinker said:

Only unabridged audiobooks count. :)

 

I listen to audiobooks all the time, with a 30 minute drive one way to work and an hour walk at lunch, I can listen to quite a few audiobooks during the year.

I just like listening to books because it keeps a different part of the brain sharp that doesn't always get flexed or utilized normally. It's that section of your noggin that compels you to conjure up imagery you can't see AKA imagination & one's own ability to apply meaning, tone, & nuance to sounds not actually present for plot twists & turns. A lot like early radio mystery programs in the 40's & 50's. 

 

True CD, a cliff notes condensed version of a book on tape is cheating or 2nd guessing the author's original vision. So yes, I agree wholeheartedly with that position. 

 

Wow, you walk an hour every day at lunch exercising both your body & mind? Very impressive. Here's the real question though: If you pop in a CD & the narrator sucks, do you still complete the book from beginning to end or not? A narrator who reads text too fast or has a thick accent can sometimes make a novel an unbearable experience to cross the finish line with. I speak from experience myself here BTW. 

 

 

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Just now, southwest1 said:

I just like listening to books because it keeps a different part of the brain sharp that doesn't always get flexed or utilized normally. It's that section of your noggin that compels you to conjure up imagery you can't see AKA imagination & one's own ability to apply meaning, tone, & nuance to sounds not actually present for plot twists & turns. A lot like early radio mystery programs in the 40's & 50's. 

 

True CD, a cliff notes condensed version of a book on tape is cheating or 2nd guessing the author's original vision. So yes, I agree wholeheartedly with that position. 

 

Wow, you walk an hour every day at lunch exercising both your body & mind? Very impressive. Here's the real question though: If you pop in a CD & the narrator sucks, do you still complete the book from beginning to end or not? A narrator who reads text too fast or has a thick accent can sometimes make a novel an unbearable experience to cross the finish line with. I speak from experience myself here BTW. 

My walking pace at lunch is slow enough I don't think it counts as exercise.  And it's not my choice, doctor's orders, but at least my company has a nice walking path thru the complex so it makes it easy.

 

It depends, while I am a huge fan and support of Librivox, there are some readers on there that I just cannot listen to because they are so bland and dry and often times put the EMphasis on the wrong syLAble.  But I usually only listen to ausiobooks that are professionally done and usually read by an actor or professional audiobook reader, so I don't run into many that are so bad I can't finish the book.

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Off topic slightly:  

 

If we live in a world where they can make GPS with different voices, why can't we have an app where say Christopher Walken reads "War & Peace" just for laughs. Or maybe Joe Pesci reads a classic like "The Merchant Of Venice?" 

 

Just goofing around. It would be hilarious though. 

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29 minutes ago, Coffeedrinker said:

My walking pace at lunch is slow enough I don't think it counts as exercise.  And it's not my choice, doctor's orders, but at least my company has a nice walking path thru the complex so it makes it easy.

 

It depends, while I am a huge fan and support of Librivox, there are some readers on there that I just cannot listen to because they are so bland and dry and often times put the EMphasis on the wrong syLAble.  But I usually only listen to ausiobooks that are professionally done and usually read by an actor or professional audiobook reader, so I don't run into many that are so bad I can't finish the book.

I'm glad that your employer has a nice path to leisurely stroll through. Speed doesn't matter my friend. Remember, the tortoise won the race not the rabbit. It's a children's fable I know, but just roll with me here. I'm trying to make you feel better man. :hat:

 

Well said--what I bolded I mean. You encapsulated the problem perfectly. You're a better man than I am CD because if I find the narrator disturbing 9 chances out of 10 I won't finish the work. It's not a cultural or dialect bias BTW; It's more of a lack of rhythm, tempo, & enunciation thing, which ties into my percussion musician background actually. 

 

Just in case you are wondering, I usually give the author about 2 hours to save themselves if I react poorly to their diction initially, but if I still struggle after that; then I move onto something else. Besides, it takes awhile to lay down the setting & key characters anyway. 

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Just started reading Boys in the Boat, Andrew Lucks' Book Club book.  I usually like fiction, but so far, it's pretty good. :thmup:

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Last weekend I finished rereading my all time favorite, Catch 22 by Joseph Heller.  It is set in Italy during World War II, and it is a very cynical look at the workings of our military, specifically, and militaries in general.  It has a story to it, but the story is mostly irrelevant as the power of this book is more in the writing style and the point that is being made through absurdity than on the events that are actually being described in the text.  I highly recommend it to anybody that enjoys good satire.  This book, in my opinion, stands by itself.  There is nothing that I can compare it to.  I've never read another book that made me think, "This kind of reminds me or Catch 22."  The only way to give somebody a sense of what this book is like is just to have them read it.

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I just finished The Silent Sister by Diane Chamberlain.  It was pretty good.  I've tried three or four times now to type some kind of brief little review, but every time I have deleted what I wrote because I am afraid that I am going to give spoilers that will ruin the book for somebody.  It is the type of book that is best if you have no idea what is going to happen.  I wanted to comment on the structure of the storytelling, but I am kind of afraid that even that would be a spoiler.  So, all I will say is this.  It started out kind of slow, but about halfway through it picked up and I couldn't put it down today.  By this evening, I ended up saying to heck with watching Giants/Cowboys and elected to read instead.  Which kind of sucks because I had stuff that I needed to get done today, and I didn't do any of it.

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I'm reading a novel called Play Dirty by Sandra Brown.  

 

It's main character is a QB for the Cowboys who was paid to throw a playoff game vs. the Redskins.  After serving time, he is now having trouble fitting back into society.

 

I waver from feeling bad for this man's present dilemma and wanting to give him a swift kick for throwing a game.

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13 hours ago, shecolt said:

I'm reading a novel called Play Dirty by Sandra Brown.  

 

It's main character is a QB for the Cowboys who was paid to throw a playoff game vs. the Redskins.  After serving time, he is now having trouble fitting back into society.

 

I waver from feeling bad for this man's present dilemma and wanting to give him a swift kick for throwing a game.

 

Sounds like a good book. I may pick it up. I love to read and used to read at least two books every month. I have not been reading many books in the last year or so.  One of my favorite authors is Richard Russo, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Empire Falls and The Bridge of Sighs. 

 

I hope to resume reading books on a regular basis again in 2017.  Perhaps  Andrew Luck can give me some suggestions. :)

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I'm currently reading Hustler magazine. But it's not what you think, I read it strictly for the pictures.

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11 hours ago, shakedownstreet said:

I'm currently reading Hustler magazine. But it's not what you think, I read it strictly for the pictures.

 

On a related topic, it still feels kind of weird to see Playboy out in the open on the magazine rack at mainstream bookstores.

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Rereading "Savannah Monitors: A Complete Guide to Varanus Exanthematicus and Others (Complete Herp Care) "

 

What can I say?  I'm a weirdo with a soft spot for my lizards 

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Just finished "Revival" by Stephen King... eh.  Not my favorite.

 

If anyone likes suspense/mystery/save the world novels involving science and history, I'd recommend James Rollins' "Sigma Force" series.  They're kinda like Dan Brown novels with slightly less religion, a lot more science, and more action.

 

I'm reading the latest "Seventh Plague" and it's just as good as his early novels.

 

His books are a weird mix of nerdy plots and suspenseful action.

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I just finished The Gnostic Gospels by Elaine Pagels.  I probably wouldn't recommend it, although I did find it kind of interesting.  It wasn't what I expected.  For those who do not know (I was among those before reading this book), the Gnostic Gospels refer to a collection of early Christian texts that were discovered in the 1940s near Naj Hammadi, Egypt.  These are Christian texts that were ultimately excluded from the Bible and were considered heretical and mostly destroyed by the leadership of the early orthodox Christian church.  Prior to the discovery in the 1940s, many of these texts were known to have existed from references in other texts but the actual text of these documents had never been seen by the modern world.  I figured this book would be a description or summary of these texts, which I figured would be interesting because it shines a light on what the competing ideas were and how Christian ideology and dogma were shaped in the early days of the church.  It turns out that there is actually very little discussion in this book about what is actually contained in the Naj Hammadi texts.  Instead, this book is more of an analysis of the social and political factors that allowed orthodox Christianity to spread and eventually dominate the religious landscape while simultaneously limiting the spread of Gnostic Christianity and leading to its eventual demise.  It was interesting, although kind of dry reading and not what I was expecting when I started reading it.

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