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Book club thread - what are you reading

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Hi all,

 

I had been thinking about starting this thread for awhile for those of us that are readers to share what we are reading. I am always interested in good books out there and will read just about anything in terms of genre and topic.

 

I had mentioned on another thread that in two weeks Harper Lee's prequel to "To Kill a Mockingbird" is due to come out. It is called "To Set a Watchman." I am not sure I have ever looked more forward to a book before. I love Lee. Her writing style, conversational tone and ability to make you feel like you know her characters through moving dialog. Once I read it, I will share up here.

 

I also recently read 'Wild" by Cheryl Strayed, http://www.amazon.com/Wild-Found-Pacific-Crest-Trail/dp/0307476073

It is a memoir of her life where she goes on a hike to sort out her life's issues. I am not a hiker but I have to say this book got me interested in it and was well written with lots of metaphors which were very cool. I did feel like Strayed was a bit whiny but overall a good read.

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Thanks for the tips!

 

Just Finished

 

The Midwife by Jennifer Worth

http://www.amazon.com/MIDWIFE-Jennifer-Worth-Midwife-Memoir/dp/B00C9ETWTK/ref=sr_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1435784788&sr=1-4&keywords=the+midwife

 

autobiographical stories of a midwife in 1950s London.  Educational from a historical perspective but mainly both interesting and entertaining stories about the various people she works with and meets through the course of her day to day job

 

There's a PBS series based on the book.  I've not seen it but I hear it's quite good

http://www.pbs.org/call-the-midwife/home/

 

Currently reading a series of 6 young adult sci fi novels: The Secrets of the Immortal Nicholas Flammel by Michael Scott

http://www.amazon.com/Alchemyst-Secrets-Immortal-Nicholas-Flamel/dp/0385736002/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1435784988&sr=1-3&keywords=Nicholas+Flammel

 

It's a guilty pleasure.  Young adult novels full of magic and giant spiders and immortal humans such as William Shakespeare.

 

Each of these books is better than the one before it, if you like this genre

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Thanks for the tips!

 

Just Finished

 

The Midwife by Jennifer Worth

http://www.amazon.com/MIDWIFE-Jennifer-Worth-Midwife-Memoir/dp/B00C9ETWTK/ref=sr_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1435784788&sr=1-4&keywords=the+midwife

 

autobiographical stories of a midwife in 1950s London.  Educational from a historical perspective but mainly both interesting and entertaining stories about the various people she works with and meets through the course of her day to day job

 

There's a PBS series based on the book.  I've not seen it but I hear it's quite good

http://www.pbs.org/call-the-midwife/home/

 

Currently reading a series of 6 young adult sci fi novels: The Secrets of the Immortal Nicholas Flammel by Michael Scott

http://www.amazon.com/Alchemyst-Secrets-Immortal-Nicholas-Flamel/dp/0385736002/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1435784988&sr=1-3&keywords=Nicholas+Flammel

 

It's a guilty pleasure.  Young adult novels full of magic and giant spiders and immortal humans such as William Shakespeare.

 

Each of these books is better than the one before it, if you like this genre

You know I have never been a big sci fi fan I think just because I am a realist in my every day life. lol.  I saw all the Matrix movies years ago and loved them and decided then that I should really give sci fi a chance. I will check out the Secrets of the Immortal.

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You know I have never been a big sci fi fan I think just because I am a realist in my every day life. lol.  I saw all the Matrix movies years ago and loved them and decided then that I should really give sci fi a chance. I will check out the Secrets of the Immortal.

It's not the best sci fi, but it'll do if you are a fan.

 

I'll have to think of what my favorite is.  I do love Dean Koontz.  You should check out his series about Odd Thomas.  

http://www.amazon.com/s/?ie=UTF8&keywords=odd+thomas+series+in+order&tag=googhydr-20&index=stripbooks&hvadid=33830379355&hvpos=1t1&hvexid=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=4430681746205402780&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=b&hvdev=c&ref=pd_sl_6e4ly9scv9_b

 

Also, I was a big fan of Ann Rice's Vampire Chronicals.  

Beginning with "Interview with a Vampire"

http://www.amazon.com/Interview-Vampire-Anne-Rice/dp/0345337662/ref=sr_1_5?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1435840404&sr=1-5&keywords=anne+rice

 

I'm also a fan of the post apocalypse genre.  I'll have to think about what to recommend

 

I'm not a massive fan of reality when I read lol

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I am reading "The Kill Room" by Jeffery Deaver

A Lincoln Rhyme Mystery

and have these books waiting in the wings

"xO" by Jeffery Deaver

A Kathryn Dance Mystery

A Collection of H. G. Wells novels featuring "The Time Machine" , "The Island of Dr. Moreau" , "The Invisible Man" , "The War of the Worlds" , "The First Man on the Moon" , and "The Fruit of the Gods"

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Dan Simmons' "Hyperion" series is some of the best science fiction I've ever read. The books are, in order, "Hyperion"; Fall of Hyperion"; "Endymion"; "Rise of Endymion.". Recommended reading for fans of science fiction and apocalytic novels.

 

I also like Anne Rice Vampire Chronicles. Her newest book in that genre, "Prince Lestat,", however, is kind of a disappointment. Difficult to explain, but the characters  and writing just wasn't up to her previous vampire books. It's like she didn't put much thought into "Prince Lestat.", just wrote it in a hurry. That's strictly my opinion, so Nadine, if you hadn't read it yet, you could check it out for yourself.to see.

 

Terry Pratchett's "Discworld" novels are very good. They're fantasy mixed in with satire. I was sad to hear of the author's passing. He was in a class by himself.

 

Danile Silva writes some excellent spy/adventure novels. The main character is Gabriel Allon, an Israeli assassin and part time restorer of famous paintings.. The books bring the world of espionage and art together.

 

There are others , but that's all I can think of for now.

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The Hyperion series sounds interesting. I might have to give that a look. 

 

I'm currently reading David Quammen's "Spillover." It's non-fiction focusing on the history of zoonotic diseases (e.g. ebola, SARS, lyme), their initial discoveries, treatment, and the future. David Quammen is a spectacular science writer.

http://www.davidquammen.com/spillover

 

I'm also in the middle of Glen Cook's "Chronicles of the Black Company." It's military fantasy. Enjoyable, quick reads. I think there are ten books in the series.

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Great thread AM,

 

I am a big book nut.

 

I loved the classics they forced you to read in high school.

 

Jane Eyre  - I'm a sucker for the tortured orphan story, powerful

The Sun Also Rises  -  The most powerful use of setting ever

The Clockwork Orange - forget the movie, great story, made up own language

The Count of Monte Christo  - the best revenge book ever made

 

Nadine

I too loved the vampire chronicles.

The Vampire Lestadt was my favorite book of the series - he made someone who wanted to die immortal

I am also a huge fan of Koontz's Odd Thomas novels.  Some of his best stuff.  Koontz keeps getting better, while King kept getting worse.

 

I love some of the young adult novels.  Harry Potter blew the socks off of Narnia.  I enjoyed the twillight series too.  New Moon was my favorite.  I did however hate the Hunger Games books.  Painfully written.

One more tortured orphan story - Ender's Game - the movie was trash.

 

Finally,  I'm a sucker for Robert Ludlam spy novels and the Connolly Bosch and Lincoln Lawyer novels. 

 

With fantasy, The Dragonlance Twins Trilogy will blow your mind, and Robert Jordan's Eye of the world isn't bad.  After the first ten in the series it goes downhill fast.

 

Popular books that I think missed. - The Girl On The Train - well written, great characters, bad story, The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo, unless the Ending was incredible, it bored my socks off and I couldn't finish it.

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Do books on cd count? I like listening to books with narrators since I it reminds me of storytelling in high school Forensics. Soon, I will be listening to Red: My Uncensored Life in Rock by Sammy Hagar. Former lead singer of the band Van Halen published in 2011. 

 

I also will be checking out this audio book too Kicking and Dreaming: A Story of Heart, Soul, and Rock and Roll by Ann & Nancy Wilson of the band Heart published in 2012. 

 

I'm a big music buff as anybody who follows me knows. 

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Hi all,

I had been thinking about starting this thread for awhile for those of us that are readers to share what we are reading. I am always interested in good books out there and will read just about anything in terms of genre and topic.

I had mentioned on another thread that in two weeks Harper Lee's prequel to "To Kill a Mockingbird" is due to come out. It is called "To Set a Watchman." I am not sure I have ever looked more forward to a book before. I love Lee. Her writing style, conversational tone and ability to make you feel like you know her characters through moving dialog. Once I read it, I will share up here.

Is the new Harper Lee book out yet? I am looking forward to reading it too.

I love to read books. I enjoy reading classics by authors like Faulkner and Hemingway. One of my favorite writers now is Richard Russo (Empire Falls; The Bridge of Sighs). I enjoy Asian Indian writers like Jhumpa Lahiri (The Namesake). I also enjoy historical novels like Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides.

Like you, I am not a fan of science fiction for the same reason -- too unrealistic.

Thanks for the thread.

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Is the new Harper Lee book out yet? I am looking forward to reading it too.

I love to read books too. I enjoy reading classics by authors like Faulkner and Hemingway. One of my favorite writers now is Richard Russo (Empire Falls; The Bridge of Sighs). I enjoy Asian Indian writers like Jhumpa Lahiri (The Namesake). I also enjoy historical novels like Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides.

Like you, I am not a fan of science fiction for the same reason -- too unrealistic.

Thanks for the thread.

It is coming out this week!! :)

 

I will discuss up here as I read it.

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It is coming out this week!! :)

I will discuss up here as I read it.

I will purchase the book today or tomorrow. I found the first chapter online and will read it on my way to work this morning.

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Reading Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas by Hunter S Thompson. Something I wish I had read 20 years ago. 

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Great thread AM,

 

I am a big book nut.

 

I loved the classics they forced you to read in high school.

 

Jane Eyre  - I'm a sucker for the tortured orphan story, powerful

The Sun Also Rises  -  The most powerful use of setting ever

The Clockwork Orange - forget the movie, great story, made up own language

The Count of Monte Christo  - the best revenge book ever made

 

Nadine

I too loved the vampire chronicles.

The Vampire Lestadt was my favorite book of the series - he made someone who wanted to die immortal

I am also a huge fan of Koontz's Odd Thomas novels.  Some of his best stuff.  Koontz keeps getting better, while King kept getting worse.

 

I love some of the young adult novels.  Harry Potter blew the socks off of Narnia.  I enjoyed the twillight series too.  New Moon was my favorite.  I did however hate the Hunger Games books.  Painfully written.

One more tortured orphan story - Ender's Game - the movie was trash.

 

Finally,  I'm a sucker for Robert Ludlam spy novels and the Connolly Bosch and Lincoln Lawyer novels. 

 

With fantasy, The Dragonlance Twins Trilogy will blow your mind, and Robert Jordan's Eye of the world isn't bad.  After the first ten in the series it goes downhill fast.

 

Popular books that I think missed. - The Girl On The Train - well written, great characters, bad story, The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo, unless the Ending was incredible, it bored my socks off and I couldn't finish it.

Wow, I really enjoyed the girl with the dragon tattoo. To each their own I guess. Predictably, the U.S. movie adaptation was horrible.

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I finished "Go Set a Watchman" by Harper Lee and have to say it was better than I anticipated. For all the talk that this book was actually written by her publisher, it was definitely Lee. No one can mimic her writing style and brilliant dialogue exchanges. Also for those that don't know, this is a prequel to "Killing a Mocking Bird" as it was written first but when reading it, it feels more like a sequel given Scout is an adult in it.

 

I don't want to share too many details in case others are reading it but the book made me laugh out loud several times as Scout flashes back to memories of her adolescence. She is 26 when the book opens and has been living in New York and then comes back to Maycomb. As is typical with Lee, there is a lot of talk with race relations in the south but somehow she is able to discuss these things without making you feel like you have to pick sides. It is such an honest portrayal of the struggles the south was going through in the 50s with the NAACP came in.

 

There are supposedly more novels in Lee's Alabama home that are supposed to publish so I will look eagerly forward to those and sharing on this thread.

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Currently reading Rubicon: The Last Years of the Roman Republic by Tom Holland

 

After I finish that I have The Landmark Arrian: The Campaigns of Alexander by (history recorded by Arrian and edited by James Romm) and Carthage Must Be Destroyed: The Rise and Fall of an Ancient Civilization by Richard Miles. 

I see you like history books. Anything in particular you would recommend reading pertaining to Germany in the 19th and 20th centuries? I had minored in European history with a focus on Germany (World War 1 through World War 2) and an always looking for more books on their history.

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I am currently reading "Either/Or" by Soren Kierkegaard.

I have "As I Lay Dying" by Willam Faulkner and "Being and Nothingness" by Jean-Paul Sartre on cue.

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I see you like history books. Anything in particular you would recommend reading pertaining to Germany in the 19th and 20th centuries? I had minored in European history with a focus on Germany (World War 1 through World War 2) and an always looking for more books on their history.

 

I haven't really read much about that time period. I mostly stick to ancient rome, greece, feudal china/japan, and the crusades. 

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Constant Reader reading Duma Key by Stephen King

Seems like King turns out a new book every few months. His production of new material is unbelievable.

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I figured I would stick this here as I don't want to start any issues on the main thread but Gary Myers has written a book called, "Brady vs Manning: The Untold Story of the Rivalry That Transformed the NFL" http://www.amazon.com/Brady-Manning-Untold-Rivalry-Transformed/dp/0804139377/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1442575010&sr=1-1&keywords=brady+vs+manning

 

I don't normally read sports books but this one seems great as it delves into both these players who apparently gave unprecedented access to Myers.

 

It literally was just released and I have a copy coming to my local library. Here is the scope of the book:

 

From Acclaimed sports journalist Gary Myers comes the definitive inside account of the greatest rivalry in NFL history

Tom Brady and Peyton Manning are perhaps the two greatest quarterbacks of all time. They are living legends who have come to embody the quarterback position and shape an entire generation of the NFL. They have also been fierce rivals every step of the way, and their many epic duels have not only ranked among the best and most exciting games ever played, they have fundamentally shaped the lives of and careers of both men.

But for all their shared brilliance, they are a study in contrasts. Tom is the underdog turned ultimate winner, an unheralded draft pick who went on to win a miraculous Super Bowl and become the leader of one of the NFL’s greatest dynasties. He is as firmly associated with big game brilliance as anyone who has ever played. Meanwhile Peyton was born into NFL royalty and a mountain of outsized expectations, yet somehow lived up to and exceeded all the hype, claiming virtually every passing record along his path to football immortality.

The contrast in greatness—between the overachieving underdog and the crown prince of football, between postseason brilliance and statistical dominance—has served as an endless source of fascination for fans and media, and over the years as the two players have faced off again and again in classic games, the argument has only intensified.

But until now, there has never been a definitive treatment of the debate that tells the real story.
What do Tom and Peyton actually think of each other? What do their coaches think of them? What about teammates and opposing players? What are they like behind closed doors and in the locker room, and how does that influence their careers? How did their vastly different upbringings shape them, and how has each handled the injuries, setbacks and defeats they’ve dealt with over their careers?

In this extraordinary book, veteran NFL correspondent Gary Myers tackles this subject from every angle and with unprecedented access and insight, drawing on a huge number of never-before-heard interviews with Brady and Manning, their coaches, their families, and those who have played with them and against them. The result is a remarkable collection of the most entertaining and revealing stories ever told about Peyton and Tom, from how they developed their vastly different leadership styles, to the unlikely friendship they’ve built over the years, to their respective exploits as locker room pranksters.

Wildly entertaining and deeply thought-provoking, Brady vs Manning is essential reading for anyone who truly wants to understand these extraordinary players.

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I finished a couple Cormac McCarthy novels. Been meaning to read him for a while but just never got around to it.

I read Blood Meridian, The Road, and Child of God and I'd put them in that order quality wise.

 

Blood Meridian probably shot all the way up to my new favorite fiction book of all time. The vivid imagery and biblical prose were magnificent. Incredibly thought-provoking and violent. Definitely not a book for the weak of heart. 

 

The Road was also a fantastic (albeit short) read depicting the end of humanity. Definitely one of the more depressing books I've ever read. Much better than the movie (which i also thought was good).

 

Child of God was IMO the weakest of the three (also by far the shortest), but was another good read depicting mental illness, and loneliness in the form of serial killer Lester Ballard. Like blood meridian, this isn't a book for the easily squeamish,.

 

I bought a few more books as I'm currently trying to get into fiction novels. American Psycho is next and then A Clockwork Orange. Love both movies, and I've read that the books are very good. 

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On 9/23/2015 at 6:30 PM, Dustin said:

Just bought Devil in the White City. Anyone read this?

My husband read it and liked it.  I have not read it yet

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On Sunday, July 12, 2015 at 1:02 AM, Coltscrazy said:

I loved the classics they forced you to read in high school.

 

Jane Eyre  - I'm a sucker for the tortured orphan story, powerful

The Sun Also Rises  -  The most powerful use of setting ever

The Clockwork Orange - forget the movie, great story, made up own language

The Count of Monte Christo  - the best revenge book ever made

 

Wait, you were forced to read A Clockwork Orange in high school?  Wow.  It's been a long time since I've read that book, but I remember it being...........well, not high school material.  Not because it is a particularly challenging book to read but because of the content.  I remember it being rather graphic at times.

 

I just finished Jurassic Park last week.  The last time I read it I was in junior high and I was bored, so I gave it another go.  Still a pretty good book, but I never realized how inexplicably dumb the ending is when I was in junior high.

 

I started another dinosaur book a few weeks ago, but I can't remember what it is called.  I'll post something about it later.  I am reading it in short spurts once every one or two weeks, so it will take me a little while to get through it.

 

I started The da Vinci Code yesterday.  I'm only five or six chapters in at this point (the chapters are very short), so I have no idea whether or not it is any good.

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On 7/14/2015 at 1:06 AM, southwest1 said:

Do books on cd count? I like listening to books with narrators since I it reminds me of storytelling in high school Forensics. Soon, I will be listening to Red: My Uncensored Life in Rock by Sammy Hagar. Former lead singer of the band Van Halen published in 2011. 

 

I also will be checking out this audio book too Kicking and Dreaming: A Story of Heart, Soul, and Rock and Roll by Ann & Nancy Wilson of the band Heart published in 2012. 

 

I'm a big music buff as anybody who follows me knows. 

I drive 150,000+ miles a year and I spend the majority of my time listening to books on cd. Helps keep my mind active. lol  In fact I listen to books on cd more then I listen to the radio.

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10 hours ago, jet1968 said:

I drive 150,000+ miles a year and I spend the majority of my time listening to books on cd. Helps keep my mind active. lol  In fact I listen to books on cd more then I listen to the radio.

Glad to hear that you enjoy listening to books on the go while you drive Jet 68 too. 

 

Listening to the written word does keep a person's mind sharp. You're absolutely right about that. Plus, it taps into a section of the brain seldom used by a vast majority of people. I just like being read to. I'm strange that way. In a lot of ways really, but I won't bore you with that. Besides, nobody has that kind of free time anymore. haha

 

Nice chatting with you Jet. Yes, it sounds like the perfect ways to stay alert on long highway trips down the freeway. 

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Anything Stephen King, Richard Matheson and of course my favorite of time:  The three Tolkien masterpieces. 

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It's kind of bad form quoting myself, but I'm referencing something that I wrote a long time ago.

 

On Wednesday, December 30, 2015 at 7:29 PM, JCPatriot said:

I started another dinosaur book a few weeks ago, but I can't remember what it is called.  I'll post something about it later.  I am reading it in short spurts once every one or two weeks, so it will take me a little while to get through it.

 

I finally finished this book this past weekend.  The book is called Raptor Red, and it is by Robert Bakker.  It follows a year in the life of a female Utahraptor during the hypothesized migration from Asia to North America over the Arctic land bridge.  I'm not really sure what I thought of it.  It is kind of a quirky book.  That is partly because the author is a paleontologist and not a writer, persay, and partly because of the way the story is told.  The story is written in the third person but from the perspective of the Utahraptor, so you see the world through her eyes and are privy to her thoughts and feelings.  It is a somewhat novel perspective that at times makes the story interesting but at other times makes it kind of clunky and awkward.  I think the awkwardness comes from the challenge that comes from writing a story through the eyes of an animal (even an intelligent animal) without overly personifying the animal.  When you're writing a story in that way, you have to keep in mind that the animal doesn't have human thoughts and emotions and take care to avoid the urge to write those traits into the characters.  This is done successfully at times.  At other times, I felt that the raptor was overly personified.  And at other times, I felt that the effort to avoid personifying the raptor made the text clunky and awkard.  All in all, it was worth reading just for the novel approach but I probably won't ever read it again.

 

 

On Wednesday, December 30, 2015 at 7:29 PM, JCPatriot said:

I started The da Vinci Code yesterday.  I'm only five or six chapters in at this point (the chapters are very short), so I have no idea whether or not it is any good.

 

The da Vinci Code was really good.  I tore through that book in about two days, staying up practically all night on a Saturday night to finish it.  If I remember correctly, I think I had planned to go to a concert that night and skipped it.  It was one of those books that I just couldn't stop reading.  With that said, though, I have never seen the movie and had no clue what the book was about before I started it.  I think if you have seen the movie or know what the book is about, then this book might be ruined for you before you even begin.

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4 hours ago, JCPatriot said:

It's kind of bad form quoting myself, but I'm referencing something that I wrote a long time ago.

 

 

I finally finished this book this past weekend.  The book is called Raptor Red, and it is by Robert Bakker.  It follows a year in the life of a female Utahraptor during the hypothesized migration from Asia to North America over the Arctic land bridge.  I'm not really sure what I thought of it.  It is kind of a quirky book.  That is partly because the author is a paleontologist and not a writer, persay, and partly because of the way the story is told.  The story is written in the third person but from the perspective of the Utahraptor, so you see the world through her eyes and are privy to her thoughts and feelings.  It is a somewhat novel perspective that at times makes the story interesting but at other times makes it kind of clunky and awkward.  I think the awkwardness comes from the challenge that comes from writing a story through the eyes of an animal (even an intelligent animal) without overly personifying the animal.  When you're writing a story in that way, you have to keep in mind that the animal doesn't have human thoughts and emotions and take care to avoid the urge to write those traits into the characters.  This is done successfully at times.  At other times, I felt that the raptor was overly personified.  And at other times, I felt that the effort to avoid personifying the raptor made the text clunky and awkard.  All in all, it was worth reading just for the novel approach but I probably won't ever read it again.

 

 

 

The da Vinci Code was really good.  I tore through that book in about two days, staying up practically all night on a Saturday night to finish it.  If I remember correctly, I think I had planned to go to a concert that night and skipped it.  It was one of those books that I just couldn't stop reading.  With that said, though, I have never seen the movie and had no clue what the book was about before I started it.  I think if you have seen the movie or know what the book is about, then this book might be ruined for you before you even begin.

I hate Raptor Red sitting on my shelf right now. I might pick it up for my next book.

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On 12/22/2015 at 2:12 PM, Dustin said:

I finished a couple Cormac McCarthy novels. Been meaning to read him for a while but just never got around to it.

I read Blood Meridian, The Road, and Child of God and I'd put them in that order quality wise.

 

Blood Meridian probably shot all the way up to my new favorite fiction book of all time. The vivid imagery and biblical prose were magnificent. Incredibly thought-provoking and violent. Definitely not a book for the weak of heart. 

 

The Road was also a fantastic (albeit short) read depicting the end of humanity. Definitely one of the more depressing books I've ever read. Much better than the movie (which i also thought was good).

 

Child of God was IMO the weakest of the three (also by far the shortest), but was another good read depicting mental illness, and loneliness in the form of serial killer Lester Ballard. Like blood meridian, this isn't a book for the easily squeamish,.

 

I bought a few more books as I'm currently trying to get into fiction novels. American Psycho is next and then A Clockwork Orange. Love both movies, and I've read that the books are very good. 

 

James Franco made the movie for this book a couple of years ago. It's okay, the acting is better than the movie but it's worth a watch if you enjoyed the book. Probably not something you'll want to watch with your friends or kids though, but it's on Netflix.

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I usually read business related books but I'm currently finishing up Other People's Money by John Kay. Pretty interesting read and deep dive on the industry and regulation of big banking in the United States and European Union. I've also just finished Donald Trump's Crippled America and the book Sinatra's Century. As you can imagine, both were rewarding in their own special way.

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On Tuesday, May 10, 2016 at 11:41 PM, nburgmei said:

I hate Raptor Red sitting on my shelf right now. I might pick it up for my next book.

 

That's weird.  I don't remember it being a particularly popular book.  I was not aware of it at all when it was published.  I just happened to run across it while I was browsing books in the library over the winter and decided to give it a shot.  Although our library does have two copies of it, which is strange for a small library.  I can't think of any other book in the library for which I have seen two copies.  I would be curious to know what you think of it if you do end up reading it.

 

I read At First Sight by Nicholas Sparks this past week.  It wasn't bad, but I wouldn't recommend it to anybody either.  It is a pretty run-of-the-mill love story, so if you like love stories you'll probably like it and if you don't you probably won't.  It's a pretty quick, simple read, so it would be good for somebody that likes the genre and wants something that they can tear through quickly without much effort.  I won't say any more than that because it is one of those books that if you have any idea what is going to happen, it will ruin it for you.

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I'm reading Dean Koontz' book "Odd Thomas" the first one in the series. So far I've read almost 200 pages, and not sure what to think about it. The book is bizarre. Koontz does write strange novels, though, so this was probably expected.

I like his descriptions, but sometimes he overdoes it. and uses too much description. That tends to slow down the reading and take up too much space.

 

I plan on finishing the book because I want to see how everything connects in the end. However, unless something really exciting happens, I don't plan on entering Odd Thomas's  world again. This first novel is enough for me.

 

I like some of Koontz's other books: "Watchers" , "Strangers", and the Frankenstein series were good. "Odd Thomas" just doesn't live up to some of his previous works IMO. The name fits because the book is very odd.

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On 7/2/2015 at 5:45 AM, amfootball said:

You know I have never been a big sci fi fan I think just because I am a realist in my every day life. lol.  I saw all the Matrix movies years ago and loved them and decided then that I should really give sci fi a chance. I will check out the Secrets of the Immortal.

If you want some excellent Sci-Fi read David Weber.  He has a couple of series that are among my favorites:  The Honor Harrington Series is, IMO, the best Military Sci Fi series ever written.  Not only are there great space battles, but also in depth look at and understanding of technology used in space travel (basically his explanations are believable) and deep in the political systems of space colonizing regimes.  Additionally the protagonist (Honor Harrington obviously) is the type of character I like to read, smart, logical, unwavering moral compass.

 

Right now, I am going back and re-reading a series from my favorite author, Jim Butcher, called the Furies of Calderon.  Excellent fantasy/magical 6 book series.  Butcher also rights my favorite overall series, The Dresden Files and urban fantasy series around a Wizard Private Investigator, Harry Dresden.  I cannot do the series justice in a few words on a forum but in the 15 book (so far) series, he deals with vampires, werewolves, cults, zombies, fallen angels, the fae, bigfoot, movie monsters,death, Santa Clause, the ErlKing, the mob and more.  

 

Also I am reading the Legion of the Damned series by William C. Deitz.  Another military sci-fi.  He does not have the breadth and depth of Davis Weber but some good military action and an interesting take on what will become of the French Foreign Legion in the future.

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On 6/10/2016 at 5:21 PM, teganslaw said:

I'm reading Dean Koontz' book "Odd Thomas" the first one in the series. So far I've read almost 200 pages, and not sure what to think about it. The book is bizarre. Koontz does write strange novels, though, so this was probably expected.

I like his descriptions, but sometimes he overdoes it. and uses too much description. That tends to slow down the reading and take up too much space.

 

I plan on finishing the book because I want to see how everything connects in the end. However, unless something really exciting happens, I don't plan on entering Odd Thomas's  world again. This first novel is enough for me.

 

I like some of Koontz's other books: "Watchers" , "Strangers", and the Frankenstein series were good. "Odd Thomas" just doesn't live up to some of his previous works IMO. The name fits because the book is very odd.

I LOVE the entire Odd Thomas series and the character in particular.  Very quirky but I found him compelling.  Love Koontz

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On 6/10/2016 at 4:21 PM, teganslaw said:

I'm reading Dean Koontz' book "Odd Thomas" the first one in the series. So far I've read almost 200 pages, and not sure what to think about it. The book is bizarre. Koontz does write strange novels, though, so this was probably expected.

I like his descriptions, but sometimes he overdoes it. and uses too much description. That tends to slow down the reading and take up too much space.

 

I plan on finishing the book because I want to see how everything connects in the end. However, unless something really exciting happens, I don't plan on entering Odd Thomas's  world again. This first novel is enough for me.

 

I like some of Koontz's other books: "Watchers" , "Strangers", and the Frankenstein series were good. "Odd Thomas" just doesn't live up to some of his previous works IMO. The name fits because the book is very odd.

I am a huge Koontz fan, I personally liked the Odd Thomas series a lot but it is weird.  I have been disappointed in Koontz never continuing on with the Chris Snow series (Seize the Night and Fear Nothing).  He hinted at more to come in the 2nd book but he's never done anything with it.  At one point it seemed like he was going to tie in the Odd Thomas series with the Chris Snow series but that never materialized either.

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On 7/14/2015 at 1:06 AM, southwest1 said:

Do books on cd count? I like listening to books with narrators since I it reminds me of storytelling in high school Forensics. Soon, I will be listening to Red: My Uncensored Life in Rock by Sammy Hagar. Former lead singer of the band Van Halen published in 2011. 

 

I also will be checking out this audio book too Kicking and Dreaming: A Story of Heart, Soul, and Rock and Roll by Ann & Nancy Wilson of the band Heart published in 2012. 

 

I'm a big music buff as anybody who follows me knows. 

Only unabridged audiobooks count. :)

 

I listen to audiobooks all the time, with a 30 minute drive one way to work and an hour walk at lunch, I can listen to quite a few audiobooks during the year.

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