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The Grey Hoodie, Bill Belichick, And "The Patriot Way"...


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#81 Brooklyn Colt

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Posted 10 October 2012 - 03:52 AM

I came here expecting to see some Patriots bashing.....and I was wrong... :barf:


*throws up*

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#82 southwest1

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Posted 10 October 2012 - 06:32 PM

I came here expecting to see some Patriots bashing.....and I was wrong... :barf:


*throws up*


With all due respect Brooklyn Colt, you are certainly entitled to your opinion and I certainly understand that they are our #1 football rival. But, it is extremely petty and shortsighted to leave a vomit reference here. Usually, people have a strong dislike and distain for the Patriots simply because of their winning percentage every year, their division titles, their SB appearances, and their Lombardi hardware. Their first inclination is to point to Spygate in 2007/2008 and say "Ah Haw! You see! The Patriots are cheaters! I told Ya. I knew it!"

What evidence are you basing that speculation on exactly? Videotape of hand signals from the QB? How can you prove that hypothesis exactly? Commissioner Goodell destroyed all the tapes. Personally, I wanted all the tapes released to the public. Either NE will be exonerated of all charges or found guilty. The Patriots got all the way to the SB and lost to the NY Giants in 2012. If Spygate broke in 2007, you can't use the flawed argument that tapes that don't exist anymore got NE all the way back to the SB in 2012. Bill Belichick's brilliance is undeniable. Look at his tenure in New York under Bill Parcells, working with LB Lawrence Taylor, his tenure in Cleveland, and his tenure in Massachusetts...This man has a record of winning and turning around pathetic and lackluster franchises into Playoff teams. No one can argue this. Bill Belichick's seal of approval got both Ozzie Newsome and Jim Harbaugh hired in Baltimore for the Ravens franchise.

I am a diehard Indianapolis Colts fan, but I respect Bill Belichick immensely for the Championship franchise he has singlehandedly built the NE into year after year for over a decade. Not Pete Carroll Bill Belichick. To deny this fact would an exercise in futility. This arch rival of mine...This chief nemesis of mine has earned all 3 of their Championships fair and square and I won't allow any individual to negate, dismiss, neglect, or gloss over that crucial fact. Championships are bleeping hard to acquire and obtain in this league and I refuse to permit all those player and coaching sacrifices get "regurgitated" upon. If LB Tedi Bruschi says that the Patriots worked their cabooses off on the field and in the meeting rooms to obtain all 3 Lombardi trophies, I believe him. His word is gospel to me; just like Jeff Saturday's word. That's all I need to hear.

Have a nice day sir.
"Invincibility lies in the defense; the possibility of victory in the attack." Sun Tzu

#83 southwest1

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Posted 12 October 2012 - 09:27 PM

Belichick is the greatest modern day football coach, better than Parcells and just as good as Bill Walsh, IMO.

However, I still despise the Patriots and will never root for them to get to a SB or win it, that is just me!!! :)


Chad72,

You bring up an excellent point. Bill Belichick is a defensive wizard equal to or greater than offensive wizard Joe Walsh. Why is defense prowess never given the same accolades as moving the ball through the air? Yes, I know NFL rules change over time and teams evolve and adapt or they redefine the record books with the St. Louis Rams Kurt Warner and Marshal Faulk in 1999.

When I think back to the NY Giants 1st 2 SB's under Bill Parcells, it was Lawrence Taylor under the guidance and tutelage of Bill Belichick that had a direct bearing on SB victories IMO. Oh sure, QBs Phil Sims and Jeff Hostetler played significant roles in obtaining Championships as did their TE's and WR's, but LT's intimidation of opposing field generals cannot be overlooked and Bill Belichick molded him into the HOF player he ultimately became.

http://youtu.be/oxppgTXECK4

http://youtu.be/n826EL1T6q8

I also love what Belichick said to Brady about his tenure in NY as a DC. "People don't leave there [The Giants] they just die there." haha

People can dislike Belichick's management style perhaps even hate it. But the man wins where ever he goes. Since I firmly believe in the old NFL adage that "defense wins championships;" I would say that given the league's obsession with the passing game, stopping the run and intimidating the QB through a relentless pass rush takes on more importance now. Therefore, a stifling and crippling defense that wins Championships should now be given more relevance and significance IMO. And Bill Belichick did precisely that in NY as the DC. Even in 2000, when the Patriots won their first SB against the Rams, it was the defense that held QB Kurt Warner in check, hit him frequently, and won the game along with Adam Vinatieri's FG kick.
"Invincibility lies in the defense; the possibility of victory in the attack." Sun Tzu

#84 -JJ-

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Posted 12 October 2012 - 11:01 PM

Chad72,

You bring up an excellent point. Bill Belichick is a defensive wizard equal to or greater than offensive wizard Joe Walsh. Why is defense prowess never given the same accolades as moving the ball through the air? Yes, I know NFL rules change over time and teams evolve and adapt or they redefine the record books with the St. Louis Rams Kurt Warner and Marshal Faulk in 1999.

When I think back to the NY Giants 1st 2 SB's under Bill Parcells, it was Lawrence Taylor under the guidance and tutelage of Bill Belichick that had a direct bearing on SB victories IMO. Oh sure, QBs Phil Sims and Jeff Hostetler played significant roles in obtaining Championships as did their TE's and WR's, but LT's intimidation of opposing field generals cannot be overlooked and Bill Belichick molded him into the HOF player he ultimately became.



I also love what Belichick said to Brady about his tenure in NY as a DC. "People don't leave there [The Giants] they just die there." haha

People can dislike Belichick's management style perhaps even hate it. But the man wins where ever he goes. Since I firmly believe in the old NFL adage that "defense wins championships;" I would say that given the league's obsession with the passing game, stopping the run and intimidating the QB through a relentless pass rush takes on more importance now. Therefore, a stifling and crippling defense that wins Championships should now be given more relevance and significance IMO. And Bill Belichick did precisely that in NY as the DC. Even in 2000, when the Patriots won their first SB against the Rams, it was the defense that held QB Kurt Warner in check, hit him frequently, and won the game along with Adam Vinatieri's FG kick.


Paraphrasing from that book I mentioned about that Rams 2000 SB

After getting beat (abeit a close game) by the Rams in the regular season by blitizing Warner, BB went to his friend Ernie before the SB and said I am outclassed at every position. What are we going to do. You think of something and I'll think of something.

They got back together and BB was pleased Ernie came up with the same idea. Stop Marshall Faulk! Hit him on every play whether he has the ball or not. Don't blitz Warner. As Faulk goes..so do the Rams. Let him get his 9 yards running occasionally.But don't let him catch all those passes. (they only blitzed Warner 3 times in the game).

So they had a patriot player be Faulk in practice and BB drilled his defense to know where he was at all times.

The night before the SB while walking behind some D players on the way to dinner he overheard them talking..."where's Faulk, where's Faulk"

BB smiled. He knew he had done his job.

#85 southwest1

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Posted 12 October 2012 - 11:38 PM

Paraphrasing from that book I mentioned about that Rams 2000 SB

After getting beat (abeit a close game) by the Rams in the regular season by blitizing Warner, BB went to his friend Ernie before the SB and said I am outclassed at every position. What are we going to do. You think of something and I'll think of something.

They got back together and BB was pleased Ernie came up with the same idea. Stop Marshall Faulk! Hit him on every play whether he has the ball or not. Don't blitz Warner. As Faulk goes..so do the Rams. Let him get his 9 yards running occasionally.But don't let him catch all those passes. (they only blitzed Warner 3 times in the game).

So they had a patriot player be Faulk in practice and BB drilled his defense to know where he was at all times.

The night before the SB while walking behind some D players on the way to dinner he overheard them talking..."where's Faulk, where's Faulk"

BB smiled. He knew he had done his job.


An intriguing point JJ. Jam the WR's off the line of scrimmage, don't allow them to get a free release, rarely blitz QB Kurt Warner, and wear down RB Marshall Faulk.

Thanks for the vital insight JJ. I appreciate it. :thmup:
"Invincibility lies in the defense; the possibility of victory in the attack." Sun Tzu

#86 southwest1

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 03:10 AM

Here is Part I of my review on the NFL career of Bill Belichick. Part II of my review will follow soon...I am not done yet. I hope that I have given the Grey Hoodie Justice Foxboro fans worldwide... :flyingelvis:


I just completed one of the best biographies on the professional NFL coaching career of 3 time SuperBowl Champion Bill Belichick called "The Education Of A Coach" by David Halberstram.

Before I go any further, I need to let my audience know a few things: I am not preoccupied with schemes, formations, and plays overall. I will do my best to keep all the names & dates straight, but I will undoubtedly apologize in advance for any accidental mistakes that I make. I want to know what motivates Bill Belichick. What makes this man tick? Why was he so apprehensive toward the media? What was it like molding HOF LB Lawrence Taylor? How did Bill create the Patriot Way? How is Bill Belichick different than Bill Parcells? What kind of mindset does it take to choose coaching as one’s chosen profession? How would I define his legacy after reading this book?

In the interest of full disclosure, I listened to this entire book on tape or rather 9 compact discs with an accompanying narrator laying out Bill’s entire story from his birth in 1952 to his 3rd SuperBowl victory against the Eagles in 2004. A span of 52 years. Also, in high school, I took Forensics and I became a pretty decent storyteller myself with hand gestures, voices, raised eyebrows, and creating vivid imagery with words. My point is a good narrator or storyteller above all else transports the reader into the subject’s shoes and makes them feel every emotion: quiet confidence, rampant insecurity, pure furry and rage, and the liberation of groundbreaking success...

As with all biographies, one central figure looms larger than any other: Steve Belichick his father, a superb scout of athletic talent in his own right who wrote a book called “Football Scouting Methods.” Steve was born in the age of Prohibition in 1919 who survived through the 1930’s Great Depression through hard labor millwork and scouting for college football teams like Vanderbilt in Nashville, Tennessee from 1949-1953 and the Navy football team from 1956 to 1989 a tenure of 33 years there in Annapolis, Maryland. Steve loved it at the Naval Academy the perfect blend of discipline, motivation, honor, and passion among coaches, athletes, and instructors. His expertise was defense.

What made Steve Belichick a great scout/evaluator of player talent was his great eyesight and peripheral vision, seeing the complete play from all vantage points as it unfolded, take away what your opponent does best and makes the quarterback the most uncomfortable forcing them to do what they don’t want to do or cannot do very well. Quality control or breaking down film on both the offense and defense is essential. By age 9 in 1961, Bill Belichick was breaking down film with his father. Once a year Bill traveled with his dad on a scouting trip. Bill learned how seriously his father took talent evaluation. Scouting is a professional job not a time to eat, drink coffee, and socialize. Always be aware of distance, field position, wind speed, weather conditions, QB cadence, what formation is the offense lining up in and what defense counteracts it? Zone or nickel? Waste nothing and teach all your players to be versatile and do more than 1 specialty. Know all your opposition tendencies: Do they use screens a lot? What do they like to do on 3rd & short? 3rd & long? How mentally strong are they in the second half? Attention to detail. Know the history of the NFL & which defenses stopped what offenses. Film study will give you all the answers about another team’s vulnerabilities you will ever need. Run it backwards and forwards as often as possible.

From his father Steve Bill learned that knowledge equals power and respect among the men on a football squad. If your men saw that you knew how to counteract an offensive scheme, they gained confidence and with confidence comes loyalty and respect. You didn’t need to be gruff or mean just better prepared than the other team. Know them better than they know themselves. Intelligence is more important than speed or brute strength. Always remember to thank the men who do the little things right which spells the difference between victory or defeat. Your players must buy into a program 100% Teach them to sacrifice their individual pride or egos for the good of the collective unit, brotherhood, or team. A bedrock principle at Annapolis. The mission or universal goal trumps all accolades and personal glory. Make a commitment to something bigger than yourself. The very essence of the word sacrifice.

I have a friend named Steve Carlson who almost graduated from Annapolis. He used to tell me about an almost blind devotion to the mission in the Navy. An almost crisp and singular focus to have your brother’s back and that failure was never an option because you didn’t want to disappoint your friends, your authority figures, and your respect for the chain of command.

Steve Belichick knew his son had think ankles, which meant that speed would never be an asset to him. More like a liability. Therefore, in high school, Steve encouraged Bill to be a center; the most important position in football next to the QB since the center was responsible for all the protection calls and o-line shifts on every play. Bill learned the value of intelligence. The football game isn’t usually by the fastest guy, but the smartest set of guys who can grasp and apply situational football correctly at the right moment.

Another man named Ernie Adams who taught Lacrosse in the same high school in Maryland taught Bill the value of being shrewd and inventive. Adams took the position by default and he had to teach himself the game. Through Adams Bill Belichick learned to adapt, to be self reliant, to think independently on your feet as the game unfolds naturally, and to inspire the play of everyone else around you. Key ingredients of lasting leadership.

In 1975, after graduating from college, Bill was hired by head coach Ted Marchibroda of the then Baltimore Colts for only $50 dollars a week where he was told “don’t spend it all in one place.” His main duty was film study or quality control work. Second nature to him by now since he often dissected film with his father Steve. Bill stayed locked in a room until he knew all opposing team’s tendencies backwards & forwards he was a Zen master at it. “He absorbed it like a sponge. It’s 2 A.M. what more can I do give me more & more film to decipher in order to help the team win?”

Bill soon learned that his mastery of film gave him both power, influence, and authority among players. He was the “King of posted” notes; nothing escaped his attention. He was through and methodical like a Pathologist studying a tiny organism under a microscope. Always search for vulnerabilities, weaknesses, & shortcomings among the competition each week. Often called “the wizard who broke down film from the cradle.” Disciplined, eager to learn, worked harder & longer than everybody else, and was natural at devising ways in which to neutral another teams offense.


By 1979, head coach Ray Perkins hires Bill Belichick to work with the Special teams and perform quality control film study duties. Bill Parcells was hired as the LB Coach. Bill was also granted permission to work with Bill Parcells too. Belichick got $30,000 in an annual salary now too. The New York Giants had a losing record, were not a contender for division titles let alone SuperBowls and a major culture change was necessary. Veteran players were lazy, were not disciplined, and it was as if the inmates were running the insane asylum. Bill learned from his father not to be the players’ friend.

Authority needed to be established immediately & Bill knew it. No “Lord of the Flies” mentality/attitude would be tolerated period. During one Special Teams meeting that Bill oversaw, a player kept talking as Bill addressed everyone in the room about their next opponent. Gary Jeter made some condescending joke about Bill’s authority & knowledge of the game. To which Bill replied “Hey Jeter, your Special Team’s play was 5-11 last year so shut the bleep up or leave the god darn room now!” Order had been restored & no other Giants player questioned his authority again. Bill learned that everyone has to toe the line, be on the same page or they are gone. No excuses! Like the cadets at Annapolis, every one must have a single uniform focus: Team First. Everything else is irrelevant.

By 1986, Bill Parcells was the head coach of the NY Giants and Bill Parcells was named his defensive coordinator. These 2 men had different motivational styles. Parcells was a meat and potatoes bully who always pushed players and coordinators buttons by questioning their manhood, toughness, or intelligence. He was crude, abrasive, dressed people down publicly in front of the staff or team. Ridicule, insults, hazing, and mocking were the order of the day. His man means of pushing peoples buttons was by loud intimidation and shame. In one meeting, Parcells brought in a trash receptacle and poured the contents on the floor and then he proclaimed “ That’s all you guys are garbage!” Parcells was also a master of sarcastic wit who often slammed reporters for asking stupid questions. But, the media loved Parcells because he provided journalists with the best sound bites and comebacks. “We call this guy toast because he gets burned so often.” “If you expect me to do the cooking i.e. win let me buy the groceries” i.e. seek my feedback on what kind of players this team needs [New York Jets tenure.]

Bill Belichick on the other hand was not a physically imposing figure. He hated the press and viewed it as a distraction from helping a team win. Adopt a collective we versus me attitude. Just leave him alone to teach and instruct without any interruptions. The more organized and prepared you are the less mistakes you make; the more wins you will likely accumulate and the the greater the respect and authority you will exhibit or an entire team. Although Belichick was not charismatic publicly, he was a master at situational football, believed intelligence was more important than size or strength which could be fixed with a full off season training and conditioning program, DO YOUR JOB WELL & LEAVE YOUR EGO AT THE DOOR. No one is immune from criticism or scrutiny on the team. There is always room for improvement regardless of ones experience or position period on the field or on the sidelines. Staff & players alike.

In both New York Giants SuperBowl years under Belichick’s regime as DC in 1986 & 1990 versus Denver and Buffalo, he had one memorable HOF LB he got to work with named Lawrence Taylor. LT was incredibly strong, knew everybody else role on defense, put all his team mates in the right spot, and he always had a rare instinct for making game changing plays or “hinge plays” at just the right time. On Game day, he always played with a fierce intensity like it was his mission to kill the opposing on turf or grass it didn’t matter. You better bring the ambulance and have the stretcher on standby. Maybe even a priest to administer last rites...

Sadly though, LT’s candle burned brightly at both ends. He had a drinking problem, a drug problem, and he often slept around with loose women. Once, he even showed up to the franchise complex with handcuffs on that needed to be removed with a bolt cutter. LT was often hung over at team meetings and he never memorized the playbook either. He didn’t have to. He always managed to pull it together on game day and his instincts almost always seemed to be right especially at the most crucial moment. Lawrence Taylor taught Bill Belichick an important lesson: Rules must apply to everyone equally with no exceptions/preferential treatment. Drugs, booze, & women can become a gigantic team distraction if left unchecked. Therefore, like his father Steve always told him pick men that are smart, selfless, with no egos, who buy completely into your system, and who follow everything you say for the benefit of the greater team concept. A we not me approach. No pre Madonna’s, no self-promoters, no show boaters, no Deion Sanders personality Cancers in an organizations locker room.

Following the 2nd SuperBowl victory in 1990, Bill Belichick was hired by Art Modell to be the new head coach of the Cleveland Browns. A then 38 year old defensive genius showed up in Ohio with a 5 year highly detailed binder program designed to get the Browns to the BIG Dance & win a ring in half a decade. All those years of film studying, dissecting vulnerabilities, strength & conditioning knowledge, breaking down throwing mechanics, foot mechanics, gap control assignments, and constant moving for little to no pay had finally paid off. However, Murphy’s Law was the only thing that followed Bill to this franchise, team, and city. “What Could Go Wrong Did Go Wrong.”

Owner Art Modell loved the press and wanted to be beloved by them every chance he got. He wanted open access with no barriers put on reporters at all. Often, freely disclosing player injuries and playbook scheme tendencies. Also, Modell kept raising fan expectations regarding how good the team was roster wise when in fact the players were old, slow, & not skilled in fundamental football.

Bill loved the idea of being hired to run the Browns franchise, oldest in the NFL, and HOF running back Jim Brown loved Belichick’s new ideas to reinvigorate & replenish this tired, obsolete, & once proud organization. Again Bill felt the press was a distraction that kept him away from plotting, planning, and winning. He valued loyalty and privacy above all else. Ask him X’s & O’s questions only or questions about schemes & a player’s ability to adapt. Just like players, Bill’s not there to rub elbows with celebrities or crave the limelight.

Always be evaluating, always be looking for ways to improve the starting lineup, the practice squad, and to avoid injuries. He always dressed simple attire either sweatshirts or hooded sweatshirts, he seldom threw anything away that might have dual value [Depression mindset like his dad], he had a voice like an undertaker with a deep monotone resonance and no humor being publicly displayed. Bill restricted media access in the locker room, didn’t believe in socializing with the media, and refused to unveil any emotional weakness or anything that might show a crack in your team’s competitive armor. His job was to find other squad’s soft spots not expose their own organizational responsibilities. The media backlash Belichick faced over this new tighter leash on the press lead to him being classified rigid, stoic, unemotional, and “the voice of doom with all the pin ash of a toaster oven.”

In addition, Bill’s decision to release starting QB Bernie Kosar on November 7, 1993 was not well received by the Ohio fan base at large. Bill grew upset with Kosar questioning his authority, running audibles, and defying his authority in the press. “I drew it up in the dirt”...a game winning drive against Belichick’s wishes until he has learned to trust you or you have earned his trust to improvise on the fly rather. Like his father Steve taught him, toe the line & buy into the program 100% or you are gone. No dissention in the locker room or in public; privacy of all company business is always paramount & never divulged outside company walls.

From 1993-1995, Bill faced death threats, fans ripped the home stadium apart down to the benches, and doll lynching were symbolically carried out at the team facility. Bill learned 2 important lessons in Art Modell moving the Browns to Baltimore...#1 Always keep the media at a distance because they threaten a team’s privacy, loyalty, & ability to gel & solidify as a collective unit united in a common goal of true sacrifice and #2 Make sure that the head coach & owner are on the exact same page regarding all decisions about the media, winning, the ability to always hit the reset button after every season, & find play who care less who gets credit for what. A we vs me mentality at all times.

When I think about the adversity Bill faced in Cleveland, I am amazed at how well he conducted himself & his staff. Death threats for a football coach. Just ponder that for a moment. There are dictators in this world who commit mass genocide of their citizens who never receive death threats. And, what does Belichick say “I need to work harder.” Wow, bury yourself in your work & control what you can control. What an enlightened attitude & a remarkable way to avoid a bodily harm, real life, dire, life & death circumstance. Years later in New England after winning his 2nd SuperBowl against Carolina, Bill was asked, “What the secret to winning a championship?” Bill replied,”Not to move your team to another city in the middle of the season.” A direct reference to his experience in Cleveland.” A hilarious response & very clever to boot in my humble opinion.

To Be Continued...

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"Invincibility lies in the defense; the possibility of victory in the attack." Sun Tzu

#87 PrincetonTiger

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 09:38 AM

Nice Thread SW
Onward Princeton Forward Princeton

PrincetonTiger77

#88 southwest1

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 07:41 PM

Here it is...The Conclusion...Part II on "The Education Of A Coach."


Bill Belichick’s NFL career at a glance:

Team(s) as a coach/administrator:

1975 Baltimore Colts *Special Assistant

1976 Detroit Lions *Assistant Special Teams Coach

1977 Detroit Lions *WR & Special Teams Coach

1978 Denver Broncos *Assistant Special Teams Coach & Defensive Assistant

1979 New York Giants *Special Teams Coach & Defensive Assistant

1980–1984 New York Giants Coach *LB's Coach & Special Teams Coach

1985–1990 New York Giants Defensive Coordinator

1991–1995 Cleveland Browns Head Coach

1996: New England Patriots *Assistant Head Coach & Secondary Head Coach

1997–1999 New York Jets *Assistant Head Coach & Defensive Backs Coach

2000–Present New England Patriots Head Coach

Graduates of Belichick’s coaching program/tree & where they are now…

Six of Belichick's assistant coaches have become NFL head coaches:

• Romeo Crennel, Cleveland Browns (2005–2008), Kansas City Chiefs (2011–present)

• Al Groh, New York Jets (2000)

• Josh McDaniels, Denver Broncos (2009–2010)

• Eric Mangini, New York Jets (2006–2008), Cleveland Browns (2009–2010) Now, an ESPN NFL Analyst

• Nick Saban, Miami Dolphins (2005–2006)

• Jim Schwartz, Detroit Lions (2009–present)

Six assistant coaches have become NCAA Division I head coaches:

• Kirk Ferentz, Iowa (1999–present)

• Ferentz's son Brian Ferentz, who played for his father at Iowa from 2001–2005, joined the Patriots scouting department in 2008 and later their coaching staff in 2009

• Al Groh, Wake Forest (1981–1986), Virginia (2001–2009)

• Pat Hill, Fresno State (1997–2011)

• Bill O'Brien, Penn State (2012–present)

• Nick Saban, Michigan State (1995–1999), LSU (2000–2004), Alabama (2007–present)

• Josh McDaniels was a graduate assistant under Saban in 1999 before joining the Patriots. Back with Patriots as their Offensive Coordinator again

• Charlie Weis, Notre Dame (2005–2009), Kansas (2011–present)

• Two graduate assistants for Weis at Notre Dame, Shane Waldron and Patrick Graham, are now assistant coaches for Belichick

One assistant coach has become a Canadian Football League head coach:

• John Hufnagel, Calgary Stampeders (2008–present)

Eleven assistant coaches or executives under Belichick have become assistant head coaches, coordinators or executives in the NFL:

• Jeff Davidson, offensive coordinator of the Carolina Panthers (2007–2010), assistant head coach and offensive coordinator for the Cleveland Browns (2006)

• Thomas Dimitroff, general manager for the Atlanta Falcons (2008–present)

• John Mitchell, assistant head coach of the Pittsburgh Steelers (2007–present)

• Ozzie Newsome, general manager for the Baltimore Ravens (2002–present)

• Scott Pioli, general manager for the Kansas City Chiefs (2009–present)

• Joel Collier, assistant general manager for the Kansas City Chiefs (2009–present)

• Mike Tannenbaum, general manager for the New York Jets (2006–present)

• Brian Daboll, offensive coordinator for the Cleveland Browns (2009–2011), offensive coordinator for the Miami Dolphins (2011), offensive coordinator for the Kansas City Chiefs (2012–present)

• Rob Ryan, defensive coordinator for the Dallas Cowboys (2011–), defensive coordinator for the Cleveland Browns (2009–2010), defensive coordinator for the Oakland Raiders (2004–2008)

• Brad Seely, special teams coordinator of the San Francisco 49ers (2011–present), assistant head coach/special teams coordinator for the Cleveland Browns (2009–2011)

• Charlie Weis, offensive coordinator for the Kansas City Chiefs (2010)

• Josh McDaniels, offensive coordinator for the St. Louis Rams (2011)

• Michael Lombardi, An Analyst for NFL Network.


By 1996, Bill Parcells and Bill Belichick had gotten New England to the SuperBowl again. Unfortunately, a miraculous return from Desmond Howard led to a victory for Brett Favre and the Green Bay Packers 35-21 as the final score in SuperBowl XXXI.

The following year in 1997 Parcells leaves New England to become the Head Coach for the New York Jets and Belichick follows him there as the defensive coordinator. The new owner of the Patriots Robert Kraft hires Pete Carroll as his new HC of the Patriots.
At this stage in Belichick’s professional life, he really wants to be more than just be known as a brilliant defensive coordinator. He learned from his mistakes in Cleveland…Be on the same page with your owner, keep the media at an arm’s length focusing only on X’s and O’s questions as they strictly pertain to football alone, always let the team and city know that you are in complete control never allowing “the inmates to run the asylum,” and let everyone in the complex know that team needs always come before individual or selfish needs. In addition, Bill learned not to wine and dine players, but to sell them on the sophistication of the program, wanting smart guys on the field to run it, and not being a sentimental slave to favorite sons of the community. Case in point Bernie Kosar. Also, Bill learned never to make a situation personal with a player. With Bernie, he made it public that he thought his QB was too old, too slow, too broken as an athlete to be productive on the field anymore.

A mistake by his own admission. Never let the media or your opponents see a crack in your team’s armor or anything that prevents an exposed vulnerability to an outsider. You will lose your authority; your competitive edge & victory & defeat in this league was razor thin. Control what you can control. Shield your locker room from the outside world like a stout defense make it almost impenetrable like a fortress guarded 24/7 at Annapolis.

Prior to leaving for New York in 1997, Belichick appreciated that Robert Kraft always appreciated his skills as a patient teacher and Bill admired Robert’s willingness to listen, learn, and his intense desire to win at any & costs…Competitively driven people always tend to flock toward one another.

This affection for each other’s drive to succeed led Robert Kraft to pull Belichick away from the New York Jets and hire him as the new HC of the New England Patriots in 2000. Robert had complete trust in Bill’s intelligence to lead the Patriots in the right direction & his was smart enough to know what he did know. To quote Tedy Bruschi: “Owners own, coaches coach, & players play.” Have faith in your staff & stay the heck out of the way. Let Bill make whatever judgments he sees it.



Bill Belichick revolutionized how a franchise approached the draft & the evaluation process…Scouting/evaluation never stops there is no off season, stockpile intelligent players who can adapt quickly on their feet, eat sleep & drink football every minute of the day or night, don’t tank your team’s salary cap by throwing tons of money at free agents, priority 1: Team first at all times, Priority 2: Do your job well no one else’s, & Priority 3: Leave your ego & personal issues at the door. When you enter the complex, football & finding a way to improve this team is your only objective.

In the age of free agency, maintaining an excellent level of success was almost impossible to achieve. Athletes constantly left for larger salaries and bigger paydays meaning you constantly had to replenish your talent to fill voids on the field & on your practice squad. Winning & dynasties mean more now because unlike the Steelers of the 1970’s & the 49ers of the 1980’s you can’t collect superstar athletes at every position like a Pez gum dispenser anymore.

When I think of the talent Belichick assembled since landing in New England, I am blown away…Richard Seymour, Mike Vrabel, Tedy Bruschi, Ty Law, Troy Brown, and of course Tom Brady. To say Brady was a reclamation project would be a glaring understatement. Not a physical piece of chiseled perfection. He needed to lift and his footwork was not refined yet. But, he was wicked smart and incredibly competitive going back to his Michigan college days. A body can be molded & sloppy footwork fixed, but you can’t teach innate intellect or a high football I.Q. You either have it or you don’t & Brady had it in spades…Just like Belichick, Brady had an uncanny ability to comprehend situational football and he was very disciplined…He mastered the playbook quietly, he stayed after practice throwing to WR’s saying “if we all work to hone our crafts. We will all make this team.” Brady came in early & motivated others around him to lift weights, master their playbooks, & get better on the field with reads, receptions, & completions=genuine leadership by quiet example. He hated to lose & he soon knew everyone’s role on the field as well as how defenses tried to neutralize him & prevent him from doing what he preferred to do on game day initially.


Drew Bledsoe was the actual QB starter ahead of Brady, but Brady’s long hours of film study & timing with the WR’s got him elevated from 4th string, to 2nd string, to 1st string field general. Bill had worked with Bledsoe in 1996 and he knew what his tendencies & vulnerabilities were. And he didn’t read disguised defensive coverages that well.

Brady, on the other hand, almost always made the right read going through all his progressions first & his mind wasn’t clouded by other schemes, systems, & playbooks like Bledsoe was either. Brady also had a quick release of the ball, was very decisive with no hesitation whatsoever. BANG! The ball is gone. Offensive line love that because it reduces sacks & pocket collapses too. In addition, Brady, due to his countless hours of film study, had a great feel for the pass rush & how to elude LB’s & DE’s through proper footwork & shoulder placement never being afraid to take what the defensive gave him & he had a great rhythm for understanding the flow of the game…When to pick up the tempo & go to the no huddle offense to prevent defensive substitutions on the field. Also, Brady, unlike Bledsoe, knew when to throw the ball away & live another down & not force the ball into double & triple coverage forcing a turnover & altering the final outcome of a critical game.

When I think back about Bledsoe’s injury, his return to the field, & the decision to roll with Brady, I am simply speechless now…Make the wrong choice here & it’s Cleveland 2.0 all over again. Okay, perhaps not death threats this time, but Bill’s tenure in New England would have been over.

What sold Belichick on Brady was his relentless work ethic, his tremendous leadership to lift the play of all his team mates around him, his knack for not letting any confidential information of the Patriots plans outside of the locker room to the media, & he loved the process of sacrifice: Hit the reset button every season, start over from scratch, forget ProBowls, MVP Awards, positive press clippings, & if you concentrate hard enough & maintain focus long enough & the ball bounces in your favor at the right time…a World Championship is within your reach. Immortality in Canton with the Football Hall Of Fame is what we are striving for team unity=Championship Glory.


ESPN reporter Sal Paolantonio once referred to QB Tom Brady working with unknown offensive players like jamming with Eric Clapton “if you need him to work off the written page he’s fine, but if you need him to improvise he will amaze you.” I happen to revere guitar legend Eric Clapton by the way & knowing both Belichick & Brady now like I do the comparison makes perfect sense. Both Clapton & Brady slide a new performer in the studio or the field & they find a way to mold either the musicians or the fresh recruits into action and produce a masterpiece of flawless execution once the final track has been played & final drive ended with a touchdown.

I’m not going to breakdown every SuperBowl victory in 2001, 2003, & 2004. In 200l versus the St. Louis Rams, Bill had 1 fundamental goal: “Butch the Back!” Ignore blitzing Kurt Warner…Always know where running back Marshall Faulk is at all times & hit him hard & frequently to wear him done by the 4th quarter. Neutral Faulk & you end the Rams Championship dreams. The Patriots who were introduced as an entire team that day in the tunnel won as a team and collective unit reminiscent of his father Steve’s year’s at Annapolis via…SELFLESS SACRIFICE…

When I think back on Bill Belichick’s legacy as a coach, man, father, son, & mentor, I think of stages in a revolution…First the establishment in charge ignores you, then they mock/ridicule you, then they resist & despise you, & finally they accept your contributions as groundbreaking and replicate all your ideas as their own permanently altering the collective landscape of your field forever.

The other thing that fascinates me about this profession coaching is the long tedious hours of isolation breaking down film, coming up with new schemes & countermeasures to prevent vulnerabilities from being exposed, a process that never ever stops because even when you win to quote Dallas Cowboys Coach Jimmy Johnson “the virus of personal expectations”, distractions, & greed detract a team from a uniform focus “on something bigger than yourself.”

I think about my friend Steve Carson nearly destined to 1 day be the captain on a submarine. I think of collective uniformity and the disappearance of greed & arrogance. I think of a tight family unit that has everyone’s back & whose only loyalty is teach other. I think of the expression “knowledge is power.” I think of how Deion Sanders and people of his egotistical ilk have no place in the “Patriot Way.” As my stepmother always says “Greatness needs no self promotion.”

All coaches pay a heavy burden though. Quiet solitude, venomous fan backlash in the event of failure, and dissolved marriages because even when you are home you are never really there mentally preoccupied with new plays to neutralize and outwit your chief rival & adversary…The planning & the process of coaching never ever dies…

A Great Book & A man named Bill Belicheck who reconfigured this glorious called NFL Football…Thank you Bill…

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"Invincibility lies in the defense; the possibility of victory in the attack." Sun Tzu

#89 -JJ-

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 09:11 PM

You hit it spot on. Most of which Pats fans already knew but to see it in prose was beautiful. Many thanks.

Re Brady knew when to throw the ball away. I will never forget that full rookie season when on the last drive to win the 2001 SB he smartly threw it away on 2nd down. I envisioned Drew or other QBs trying to make a desparate play and lose it. He lived for the 3rd down and the rest is history.

Nicely put about his stint in Cleveland too.So many think he failed. The only fail was the media & owner:)

Re building the team in 2000: he also recognized the cap that would become law in 2001.
Most teams ignored it thinking they could borrow on it and thus cap H was born for many teams. The Titans fell the deepest being in debt for years.

Bill imposed a cap salary on himself before it was law. Thus NE was way ahead in the Cap game. A vital strategy now added to football.

I will also add that you might not know but will make sense to you..Bill's dream was to build a plug and play team. He knew injuries were part of the game and he wanted to plug anyone in for anyone else and in different positions. (see WR playing DB)
He reached that dream about 3 years ago for the most part but it is now perfected in this 2012 team.

Though one can't plug Brady;-)

#90 IcEWoLF

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 12:08 AM

Thank you southwest1, amazing thread and great read sir!

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#91 cmgww

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 01:27 AM

You know I actually pulled for the Pats in 2001 when it was clear the Colts were not making the postseason. Just after 9-11, the snow game v. the Raiders, I was actually happy to see them win the SB. Maybe it was the David v. Goliath mentality of them given no shot against the Rams...wow how things have changed. I respect the organization for sure...but will never EVER cheer for them. Part of the rivalry I guess. But it was cool seeing them take down the vaunted Greatest Show On Turf that season. Who would have thought a decade later they would still be on top?
In it to win it since 1992....COLTS fan first, Manning fan 2nd

#92 -JJ-

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 10:54 AM

It is ironic they are on top now. But when BB came here he had a 3 year plan. They went to and won the SB early much to the surprise of BB.
They did miss the playoffs 2002 when they couldn't stop the run. They got Ted Washington 2003 and the rest is history.

#93 GoPats

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 12:05 PM

Nice job, SW! It's a great book isn't it? Belichick truly grew up with football in his blood. I love the "my son has thick ankles" story from his dad too, lol... so you're saying Bill's got cankles? haha...

#94 PrincetonTiger

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 12:10 PM

Nice post SW
Onward Princeton Forward Princeton

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