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chad72

Awesome Article On Manning's Audible System

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tell me something we dont already know.Weve known how this works for the last 10 years.

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Umm.. wow, smoke is coming from my ears from information overload. That's why they call Peyton Manning the most cerebral QB ever.

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That's an interesting piece. Did you write it? The tone and phrasing seem very similar to when you have long responses to threads.

Very good.

One thing in the article that was not portrayed was Manning calling the blocking schemes. That is not what happens. Manning, as stated in the article, does indicate where he thinks pressure is coming from or where he thinks stunts will be going to, but it's up to Saturday to process that information and then make the line calls.

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That's an interesting piece. Did you write it? The tone and phrasing seem very similar to when you have long responses to threads.

Very good.

One thing in the article that was not portrayed was Manning calling the blocking schemes. That is not what happens. Manning, as stated in the article, does indicate where he thinks pressure is coming from or where he thinks stunts will be going to, but it's up to Saturday to process that information and then make the line calls.

No, I wish I had the time to blog and maintain it.

It is a blogger from Cincinnati, I think, that manages this blue colts sunday blog. He had registered on another colts message board that I frequent with a location of Cincinnati giving a plug for his blog (before he took it down), that is the basis of my guess :).

The Wayne route, explaining why Wayne stopped, and how Manning normally goes to the guy going across the field (Collie was open for the pass on that fatal Tracy Porter SB INT TD) - it is really hard to tell if that is the true reason Wayne stopped and expected Manning to go elsewhere. If Wayne said that, he would be accused of throwing Manning under the bus, and if Manning said he expected Wayne to continue with a few steps back on that route, Manning will be accused of throwing Wayne under the bus. Everyone will then be up in arms that the Colts are giving excuses. I guess we will never know until their careers are over.

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...

The Wayne route, explaining why Wayne stopped, and how Manning normally goes to the guy going across the field (Collie was open for the pass on that fatal Tracy Porter SB INT TD) - it is really hard to tell if that is the true reason Wayne stopped and expected Manning to go elsewhere. If Wayne said that, he would be accused of throwing Manning under the bus, and if Manning said he expected Wayne to continue with a few steps back on that route, Manning will be accused of throwing Wayne under the bus. Everyone will then be up in arms that the Colts are giving excuses. I guess we will never know until their careers are over.

And, except for pure curiosity, does it really matter? They're both treating it just like they should.

That was a great read, thanks for posting it.

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I don't want to let my Colts bias get in the way, but Peyton Manning is very short of perfect (his passes are not always tight spirals and sail from time-to-time, but his timing and preparation make up for it). The other day, I was having a barbeque with friends, and an astute Rams fan said, "If Peyton Manning were on the Patriots, they would win the Superbowl every single year". After reading this article, I could really see that. He is once-in-a-lifetime QB.

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I have also noticed a tendency that Peyton won't signal a play-action play if he sees a creep from a defender. This makes sense because if he detects that the LBs or safeties are in coverage, he wants them to bite on the run to open up the field. If I was a defender, I would try and disguise my coverage by showing blitz. That would eliminate the possibility of more play-action plays and allows defenders to focus on their individual match-ups.

Other than that, I really enjoyed the article. I wish it would have touched on code-words. I remember Chris Collinsworth was doing commentary on a Colts game (can't remember which one) and he kept calling out Peyton's use of the word "Omaha." I know that means audible or hot route. I haven't paid much attention to what his other code words at the LOS are.

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I have also noticed a tendency that Peyton won't signal a play-action play if he sees a creep from a defender. This makes sense because if he detects that the LBs or safeties are in coverage, he wants them to bite on the run to open up the field. If I was a defender, I would try and disguise my coverage by showing blitz. That would eliminate the possibility of more play-action plays and allows defenders to focus on their individual match-ups.

Other than that, I really enjoyed the article. I wish it would have touched on code-words. I remember Chris Collinsworth was doing commentary on a Colts game (can't remember which one) and he kept calling out Peyton's use of the word "Omaha." I know that means audible or hot route. I haven't paid much attention to what his other code words at the LOS are.

Collinsworthless doesn't know Peytons code words. And besides they change every game. He might use the same words but I guarantee they won't have the same meaning. Btw please refrain from mentioning that Colt haters name in here. Makes me wanna vomit!!

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I think when he says Louisiana that means block Left or shift over to the left side. Or i could be entirely wrong, alls I know is Louisiana is a blocking signal or term or whatever. I could be wrong about that too. His language is complex.

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Good read, thanks for posting. I remember seeing an interview with Jon Gruden where he said when he was coaching against Manning, he couldn't stop him, so Gruden just decided to send nearly everyone in on a blitz to see how it would go. Peyton quickly saw the blitz, got rid of the ball and the Colts scored a TD. Peyton then walked over to Gruden on the sidelines and said "Are you *** kidding me?" and Gruden was too mad/stunned to answer. Peyton does so much for this team, I've never seen any one player do this much and have this much control. All the more reason why, in my opinion, he is the best QB (and possibly player) ever.

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This was really enjoyable. thanks. I dont think a super computer could proccess that much, that fast! :huthut:

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This was really enjoyable. thanks. I dont think a super computer could proccess that much, that fast! :huthut:

It's really insane how precise each action is. Half a second of hesitating could mean the difference between making a tackle and having the runner get by you. Half an inch could be the difference between an interception and a touchdown.

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Very good article aside from some grammatical errors. :P Only part I disagree with is in this paragraph:

What Manning does 45 times a game every Sunday would have been thought to be impossible by the leading minds in the game as recently as 2004. Yes, there is overlap there. The Colts were doing most of this since 2002, but it probably was not until 2004 that the most brilliant guys in the league understood and believed that what they were seeing was more than a QB changing from one set play to another (like what Jim Kelly was doing in Buffalo). Most of the time nowadays when you hear the commentators mention during a game that the QB is changing the play, they will either infer or plainly state that they are doing it like Manning. This is simply not the case.

"Changing from one set play to another" is what I would say is the definition of calling an audible. Jim Kelly did much more than just call audibles, he ran the no-huddle offense and he called the plays, not the offensive coordinator. He was the last QB prior to Manning who called his own plays the majority of the time. This is a very minor squabble with an otherwise very well written and well thought out article and may be simply a misunderstanding on my part in what the author was trying to say there. :)

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Very good article aside from some grammatical errors. :P Only part I disagree with is in this paragraph:

"Changing from one set play to another" is what I would say is the definition of calling an audible. Jim Kelly did much more than just call audibles, he ran the no-huddle offense and he called the plays, not the offensive coordinator. He was the last QB prior to Manning who called his own plays the majority of the time. This is a very minor squabble with an otherwise very well written and well thought out article and may be simply a misunderstanding on my part in what the author was trying to say there. :)

I am the author of the article. The difference between what Jim Kelly did in Buffalo is that he was calling plays. Manning *creates* plays at the LOS. The difference is huge.

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