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ColtsBlueFL last won the day on April 6 2016

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  1. He's doing fine- Teams are reviewing medical info: On #OSU S Malik Hooker: Combine recheck went as well as it could. Healing is good. No questions there. — Ian Rapoport (@RapSheet) April 21, 2017
  2. STRENGTHS: Gifted athlete with impressive blend of burst, body control and reflexes…outstanding play speed, covering a lot of green…magnet to the ball due to his cover awareness, field vision and range…transfers weight to smoothly open his hips, turn and run without gearing down…impressive lower body explosion and leaping skills…unique timing/anticipation to break on the ball and make plays most defensive backs don’t…elite ball skills with the innate ability to find, judge and disrupt the catch point…long arms and strong hands to finish interceptions – finished second in the FBS with seven pick-offs in 2016…playmaker with the ball in his hands with 181 yards (25.9 average) and three touchdowns on interception returns in 2016 (had another return for a score that was called back due to a phantom penalty)…explosive tackler and doesn’t need a runway to create momentum…fast angles working downhill with range to clean up plays his teammates miss…uses his length to lasso ballcarriers out of his reach…experienced on special team coverages…soft spoken personality and motivated by his family.
  3. He is starter material, at FS. Don't be fooled. /in yours, not Ballard's and the Colts scouting team. They went BPA a Hooker fell in their lap. Teams are reviewing medical info: On #OSU S Malik Hooker: Combine recheck went as well as it could. Healing is good. No questions there. — Ian Rapoport (@RapSheet) April 21, 2017 Ballard said he doesn't draft by need, he stocks the best players... BPA. He saiys Hooker was High, very high on his list.
  4. Chucky thought D'Joun Smith was the next best thing to sliced bread too..
  5. Chris Landry had Malik Hooker #4 overall in the players rankings...Ahead of Foster, Lattimore, Jones, Barnett, Fournette... etc...
  6. 6.9 – 6.5 = Immediate Starter (4) 6.9 = Early 1st Round 6.5 = Mid to Late 1st Round Value 1. (rsSO) MALIK HOOKER–OHIO STATE–FS (M) 6010|206 lbs|3SO New Castle, Pa. (New Castle) 4/2/1996 (age 21) #24 YEAR (GP/GS) TKLS TFL SACK FF PD INT GRADE 1st Round 2014: Redshirted MEASUREABLES Arm: 32 1/4 | Hand: 10 3/4 | Wingspan: 77 3/4 2015: (13/0) 10 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 COMBINE N/A (injured) 2016: (13/13) 74 5.5 0.5 0 11 7 PRO DAY N/A (injured) Total: (26/13) 84 5.5 0.5 0 11 7 Recent procedures to repair his labrum and hernia will prevent Hooker from participating in testing drills. The 6-foot-2, 205-pounder has tremendous ability to track the ball and outplay receivers in the air. He is prone to over-aggression as an open-field tackler but has so much upside potential. He played with the injuries down the stretch, including the Michigan game which is arguably one of Hooker’s best…………True single high safety who could thrive in cover one or cover three, roaming sideline to sideline and creating plays via takeaways. Pure centerfielder with speed, athleticism, ball skills and tackling ability. Ed Reed-like upside safety with a penchant for delivering big plays between the hashes. He finished the regular season with seven interceptions, including three pick-sixes, while exhibiting terrific range and anticipation as a deep middle defender. Has the best ball skills of any defensive back in the country I have seen in quite sometime. BACKGROUND: A three-star safety recruit out of high school, Hooker focused on basketball most of his life before trying out for the football team as a junior at New Castle High School – could have played basketball collegiately. He was better known for his abilities on the basketball court, leading his team to a perfect 31-0 record as a senior and the leading scorer, but once programs like Ohio State started showing interest in his football abilities, Hooker decided football was best for him long-term, committing to the Buckeyes. He redshirted in 2014 and struggled to adapt to the demands of major college football, almost quitting and transferring to a smaller college closer to home to play basketball – Urban Meyer credits Hooker’s mother (Angela Dennis) for not allowing him to quit. Hooker stayed in Columbus and trusted the coaches, playing in all 13 games as a special teamer in 2015 with plenty of hype coming from his performance in practice. With Tyvis Powell and Vonn Bell leaving for the NFL, Hooker became a starting safety in 2016 as a sophomore and emerged as an All-American, leading the Big Ten with seven interceptions. He finished third on the team with 74 tackles and 11 passes defended to earn First Team All-American and All-Big Ten honors. Capitalizing on his breakout 2016 season, Hooker elected to skip his final two seasons and enter the 2017 NFL Draft. STRENGTHS: Gifted athlete with impressive blend of burst, body control and reflexes…outstanding play speed, covering a lot of green…magnet to the ball due to his cover awareness, field vision and range…transfers weight to smoothly open his hips, turn and run without gearing down…impressive lower body explosion and leaping skills…unique timing/anticipation to break on the ball and make plays most defensive backs don’t…elite ball skills with the innate ability to find, judge and disrupt the catch point…long arms and strong hands to finish interceptions – finished second in the FBS with seven pick-offs in 2016…playmaker with the ball in his hands with 181 yards (25.9 average) and three touchdowns on interception returns in 2016 (had another return for a score that was called back due to a phantom penalty)…explosive tackler and doesn’t need a runway to create momentum…fast angles working downhill with range to clean up plays his teammates miss…uses his length to lasso ballcarriers out of his reach…experienced on special team coverages…soft spoken personality and motivated by his family. WEAKNESSES: Wild pursuit angles dent his batting average as a tackler…lowers his pads with an accurate strike zone, but needs to clean up his mechanics when breaking down to be a better finisher…trusts his eyes and follows the ball, but vulnerable to misdirection and play fakes…aggressive style in the secondary can lead to incorrect guesses…limited experience as a blitzer…room to get stronger and improve his functional strength…inconsistent physicality and leverage taking on blocks near the line of scrimmage…basketball was his first love and still young in football years – only one season as a collegiate starter…medicals require vetting after surgeries (Jan. 2017) to repair a torn labrum in his left hip and sports hernia “on both sides” – missed the entire pre-draft process. SUMMARY: A one-year starter at safety, Hooker had a breakout sophomore season for the Buckeyes and quickly created NFL buzz, finishing with seven interceptions and three defensive touchdowns in 2016. When evaluating the safety position, scouts are looking for three main traits: range, instincts and tackling skills. And Hooker has the ability to be above average in all three areas. His change of direction skills, play speed and overall range jump off the film, both as a centerfielder in the deep half of the field and downhill in run support. His ball skills and ballhawking instincts to anticipate, read and break on the ball separate him from most college safety prospects. He needs to clean up his tackling mechanics and pursuit angles to be a better finisher, but he has the skill-set to develop into a reliable NFL tackler. Overall, Hooker has special traits to be a disruptive NFL playmaker in the secondary – one of the most talented prospects in the 2017 class and will be drafted top-10.
  7. Free article #4 from Chris Landry- The Great Ones that Never were... Every sport has it’s could-have-been-if-not-for-injury stories. I have compiled a list of some of the best pro football players whose careers were cut short due to injuries or other circumstances. I have based it on film grade viewing either when I was actively scouting in the league or looking at old game footage as I do every offseason. I also use scouting notes that I have compiled from older scouts that were around in pre-dated by work in the league. In the football world, the name that always come to the forefront for me is ex-Bengals quarterback Greg Cook. The late Bill Walsh worked with many great quarterbacks, including Joe Montana and Dan Fouts. However, he told me on several occasions that the Cook was the finest natural athlete of any quarterback he had ever seen. He was big, athletic, and with a quick arm and release. QB GREG COOK–U.CINCINNATI–BENGALS Cook was the 5th pick in the 1969 draft and if it was more of a passing league like today, he would have gone #1 ahead of USC RB O.J. Simpson. Imagine the best qualities of Dan Marino and Joe Montana and you had Greg Cook. He threw the ball a lot like ... {snipped, see URL} RB BO JACKSON–AUBURN–RAIDERS {see article} RB CURT WARNER–PENN STATE–SEAHAWKS {see article} DT WALLY CHAMBERS–EASTERN KENTUCKY–BEARS DT MIKE REID–PENN ST.—BENGALS OT/OG DEAN STEINKUHLER–NEBRASKA—OILERS RB EDDIE LEE IVERY—GEORGIA TECH—PACKERS FB ALONZO HIGHSMITH—MIAMI-FL—–OILERS RB DON WOODS—NEW MEXICO—PACKERS DT STEVE NIEHAUS–NOTRE DAME—SEAHAWKS {all details for the above are contained in the article} See more here- https://landryfootball.com/great-ones-never/
  8. Chris Landry Free article #3 Life on the road as a scout In the high glamour world of pro football, it is the players and coaches who get the lions share of the credit and the huge salaries. Not much attention is given to the gentlemen who find the players out on the road. Such is the life of an NFL scout. Long car rides, hurried flight connections, cheap motel rooms and fast meals are the norm as is lonely nights writing reports to the wee hours of the morning. Much like many other NFL personnel, a scout’s season begins with training camp. At camp, a scout’s responsibility is to evaluate his own team’s personnel as well as other NFL team’s personnel during the preseason. Teams are always scouring other team’s rosters for guys that might be let go that would be nice fits for bottom of the roster spots on their own team. During Training camp personnel meetings, coaches and scouts can learn to be on the same page as to what type of player is needed at each position. Teams that win are ones that find role players that fit your scheme but may not be a fit for another team. Frank Wycheck was a player that did not fit the Redskins scheme as an on line tight end but I felt comfortable that he would fit well in our scheme as a H-back with the team I was scouting for at the time (Oilers). In addition to scouting duties during camp, scouts finalize their fall college scouting schedule. Each team breaks down the country in regional areas and a scout is responsible for all schools in his assigned region. Scouts stay in that area year after year as they become more and more familiar with the programs and coaches in that area. It’s important that there are no gaps and that all prospects are looked at. .... {snipped} See the whole article here- https://landryfootball.com/life-on-the-road-as-an-nfl-scout/ P.S. I need an editor making titles!! LOL
  9. Free Article #2, Evaluating the best evaluators- Those of us inside the football business who really know the game and who’s responsible for driving personnel decisions for various teams believe that figuring out which players to draft and where to draft them is one of the most difficult tasks in sports. Based on over 25 plus years as an NFL Scout and knowing the inside of how decisions are made, here are the best evaluators and drafters in the history of Pro Football. 1. Bobby Beathard—Chiefs, Dolphins, Redskins, Chargers {snipped content: see article} 2. Art Rooney Jr.—Steelers {snipped} ...... 5. Bill Polian–Chicago (USFL), Bills, Panthers, Colts Cut his teeth in the USFL with Marv Levy and they both moved on to the Buffalo Bills where he built them into 4 AFC Championships. Polian then moved to Carolina where he quickly got them into the NFC title game. Then on to Indianapolis where he ran the Colts with Jim Mora and then Tony Dungy, finally earning a Super Bowl title. He was more of a pro personnel evaluator (NFL talent) than a college scout, relying on his field scouts and organizing their evaluations. Guys like John Butler and Dom Anile really helped to make his drafts. ... 13. Bill Belichick–Browns, Patriots {snipped} See more here- https://landryfootball.com/scouting-scouts-evaluating-best-evaluators-pro-football-history/
  10. On draft day, I'll relay some teasers and their free articles web site URL from Chris Landry concerning the NFL draft and / or scouting. Here is the first of these: History of the NFL draft. Some teasers: 1974 PITTSBURGH STEELERS: Following the previous years drafts where they acquired Joe Greene, LC Greenwood, Terry Bradshaw, Mel Blount, Jack Ham, Greg Mullins, Dwight White, Ernie Holmes, Larry Brown, Mike Wagner, JT Thomas and Franco Harris, Pittsburgh may well have had the best draft ever to add to that group- Art Rooney Jr., Dick Haley and Chuck Noll. Scouts Bill Nunn and Tim Rooney 1st round= USC WR Lynn Swann 2nd round= Kent St LB Jack Lambert didn’t have 3rd round pick—was traded to Raiders 4th round= Alabama A&M WR John Stallworth 5th rd= Wisconsin OC Mike Webster (thought to be too light) (many in the league thought Lambert was a reach, Stallworth had previously ran a bad time but the Steelers re-timed him again at later date, and while others thought Webster was too light, the Steelers thought he played stronger on film) Next, All Pro QB's do not necessarily make good GM's / HC (and a story of why you stay true to your board!)- 1981—Missing out on Joe Montana, Packers HC/GM Bart Starr had to get a QB to try and save his job and took CAL QB Rich Campbell overruling the scouts who wanted to take USC Safety Ronnie Lott. ---------------------- Read much more here- https://landryfootball.com/nfl-draft-history-free/
  11. Good post. And You're right, we never found out which teams were going to pull the trigger. And for those that don't remember, here's how it went down from there- "We can put it on the record now: We were never going back in the draft," his agency's general counsel, Rick Smith, told Klemko. "If someone had drafted him, we would’ve had a long, long discussion about it, but at the end of the day you can’t go back in the draft. He could get injured, gain weight, or 10 great tackles could come out. Too many risks." The bluff worked.
  12. You trust rumors this time of year? This is lying season, you know...
  13. I've seen it often in some of his articles. It appears he does not have (or at least use) an editor. But he is/was a scout and writes in scout speak. ;-)
  14. Here is the last vertical chart on OLB / DE from Chris Landry. Only Mckinley's report (per topic) included. COLLEGE DRAFT GRADING SCALE 7.4 – 7.0 = Superstar Ability (0) 7.4 = 1st Pick Value 7.0 = Definite Top 5 Pick 6.9 – 6.5 = Immediate Starter (4) 6.9 = Early 1st Round 1. (JR) MYLES GARRETT–TEXAS A&M 6.5 = Mid to Late 1st Round Value 2. (rsS0) SOLOMON THOMAS–STANFORD 3. (JR) DEREK BARNETT–TENNESSEE 4. TACO CHARLETON–MICHIGAN 6.4 – 6.0 = Potential Starter (7) 6.4 = Early 2nd Round Value 5. (JR) CHARLES HARRIS–MISSOURI 6. TIM WILLIAMS–ALABAMA–OLB (C) 7. TAKKARIST MCKINLEY–UCLA—OLB 6020|250 lbs|4SR Richmond, Calif. (Kennedy) 11/2/1995 (age 21) #98 YEAR (GP/GS) TKLS TFL SACK FF GRADE 1st Round 2013: Contra Costa College MEASUREABLES Arm: 33 3/8 | Hand: 10 1/4 | Wingspan: 79 3/4 2014: (10/1) 6 3.5 2.5 1 (UCLA) COMBINE 40-YD: 4.59 | 10-YD: 1.60 | 20-YD: 2.67 | BP: 24 | VJ: 33 | BJ: 10’02” | SS: 4.62 | 3C: 7.48 2015: (13/12) 35 7.5 4.5 2 (UCLA) PRO DAY N/A (shoulder surgery) 2016: (11/10) 61 18.0 10.0 3 (UCLA) PRONUNCIATION tuh-CAR-ist Total: (34/23) 102 29.0 17.0 6 McKinley possesses the burst, bend, long arms, motor and experience rushing out of two and three point stance. He must learn how to better transfer speed to power and could prove a liability against the run when opponents are able to latch onto him. Terrific speed off the edge. Could be 3-4 linebacker in the NFL. Ran a 10.58 in the 100-meter in high school. McKinley (6-foot-2, 265 pounds) has recorded four sacks and has a team-high nine tackles for loss this year. He is built like DeMarcus Ware when he came out of Troy. He can be a Whitney Mercilus type impact edge rusher ability due to his initial burst, bend and tenacity. Has a torn labrum and broken glenoid in his shoulder that was recently repaired. McKinley pulled out of the Senior Bowl because of the injury. I think he needs time to develop as his hand usage and pass-rush skills needs lots of technique work. However, he is very athletic, has great burst and is relentless rusher who can slip blocks and finish. He’ll be a solid starter in time as he develops. BACKGROUND: A three-star defensive end recruit out of high school, Takkarist “Takk” McKinley originally signed with California, but was ruled an academic non-qualifier and enrolled at Contra Costa College for the 2013 season. He left the team multiple times due to frustration with his failure to reach the FBS-level, but always returned and switched his allegiance to UCLA. After a Bruins’ assistant coach discovered two uncredited classes, McKinley was able to petition the NCAA to gain his eligibility after a lengthy process, joining his UCLA teammates in the fourth game of the 2014 season. He started one game that first year and finished with six tackles and 2.5 sacks. McKinley became a starter as a junior in 2015 (12 starts) and posted 35 tackles, 7.5 tackles for loss and 4.5 sacks. As a senior, he started 10 games and led the Pac-12 with 18.0 tackles for loss, adding 61 tackles, 10.0 sacks and three forced fumbles to earn First Team All-Pac 12 honors. McKinley accepted his invitation to the 2017 Senior Bowl, but pulled out due to injury. STRENGTHS: Explosive athlete with edge speed to capture the corner…flexibility to make sharp 90-degree turns and work tight spaces, altering his pursuit route to close without gearing down…quick to read the pass-set of tackles and set up his move…understands angles to get blockers off balance before crossing their face…active rip, swat and hand maneuvers to keep himself clean from blocks…gifted reflexes to find the ball and react…works hard to hold contain and filter runs inside…lateral quickness to cover multiple gaps vs. the run…knack for knocking passes down at the line of scrimmage (10 combined pass break-ups the past two seasons)…unquestioned effort, working through the whistle and cleaning up plays – sprinter in high school track and field with a personal-best 10.58 in the 100-meters…challenging upbringing and raised by his extended family and grandmother, who died in 2011 – birth parents remain out of his life to this day…mentally and physically tough, routinely playing through pain…driven with a great personality…finished among the conference-leaders in tackles for loss and sacks in 2016 despite battling several injuries. WEAKNESSES: Undersized by NFL standards with only average arm length…struggles to consistently convert his speed to power and too easily slowed in gaps…can be washed from the hole and not a consistent edge-setter due to his narrow base, tall pad-level and lack of core strength…gets too wide of the pocket and forced to take the long way to the quarterback…active, but wild hands and needs to be more thoughtful with his pass rush sequence…too many “almost” tackles on his film and needs to better come to balance and finish…doesn’t have an indestructible body type and has battled numerous nagging injuries, including a groin issue (Sept. 2016) that plagued him throughout his senior year – also missed part of the draft process due to a torn right labrum. SUMMARY: A two-year starter at UCLA, McKinley lined up at left and right defensive end in the Bruins four-man front, standing up and putting his hand on the ground – legitimate candidate for Pac-12 Defensive Player of the Year in 2016, averaging 1.8 tackles for loss and 1.0 sack per game. His athleticism pops off the screens, screaming off the edge with initial burst and natural bend to beat blocks and flatten to the quarterback. McKinley flashes violence in his hands, but his pass rush sequence lack sophistication and he can be engulfed by blockers in the run game. Although he isn’t yet the sum of his parts, McKinley has the explosive pass rush potential to terrorize NFL quarterbacks, projecting in both 3-4 and 4-3 schemes. 8. CARL LAWSON—AUBURN
  15. I believe this to be the case for real teams, not as much mocks form media and fans. The reason I believe is this. Teams making draft day trades don't disclose players. What happens is team A wants to trade up. they find Team B that has an interest in trading down. But team B wont trade down unless their player(s) targeted goes off the board before their pick. Thus, they have determined plan B guys targeted later in the round and (at least one of them) will be there even dropping down a few slots to team A's round 1 slot. Team A says ok, if your round 1 guy is gone, and our round 1 guy is still on the board at your pick, we'll trade you our round 1 for your round one, and also give you _______. This is where the depth of the draft of similar graded players comes in. If the draft contains , say 51 round 2 graded players, and another 38 players grouped tight with high to low round 3 graded players, then an early round 4 pick would very likely get one of them, and thus a round 4 pick might satisfy the extra compensation. With less talent per round, it takes a higher extra draft pick to satisfy the trade. maybe a round 3 pick. But names aren't divulged, just terms. then see how it plays out from there whether a trade is on, or fails. So it may or may not follow the value chart, but because team know the grade and value of players where they'll likely land, not necessarily the value of draft slots.

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